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Why are extremely hard work outs necessary on primal blueprint diet?

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  • Why are extremely hard work outs necessary on primal blueprint diet?

    Why are are very hard work outs necessary if a primal blueprint diet is so successful?

    I understand the reasoning behind the diet is to emulate the diet of our paleolithic ancestors, which we are supposedly best adapted to (a matter of speculation, actually, but still a very interesting proposition).

    But why then must we engage in very difficult, heavy compound exercises almost every day of the week if said diet is so successful at stemming body fat formation?

    If it is heavy compound movement that is burning body fat, couldn't we theoretically be on ANY diet and see similar results?

    As a matter of fact I know more people than I can count on extremely high carb diets who gain muscle and lose fat, and these people are all age groups, not just younger people.

    I am not against Marks message, I just think it gets lost in the translation when people claim a primal blueprint diet makes it easier to burn fat when doing heavy resistance exercises than any other diet would. I don't see this as true. Help me realize why I might be wrong?

  • #2
    There is no single word anywhere here or in the book that claims you cant lose weight without hard workouts. I have no idea where you get your facts but its actually the exact opposite thats true.

    Though if one wants to build muscle as well as losing weight one would actually have to work out and heavy compound moves are best for that.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Nekron View Post
      There is no single word anywhere here or in the book that claims you cant lose weight without hard workouts. I have no idea where you get your facts but its actually the exact opposite thats true.

      Though if one wants to build muscle as well as losing weight one would actually have to work out and heavy compound moves are best for that.
      Yes but I have heard this myth that a primal blueprint diet makes both muscle gain and subsequent fat loss easier. My current view is that irrespective of diet (save for plain junk food diets) you will gain significant muscle if you work out very hard several days a week. I don't know why some people make it seem like primal blueprint or paleo is necessary for that.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sample size of one here... but for me, just working out hard on a poor diet got my muscles to grow, and I got stronger, but I never saw much definition in the muscles until I started to eat right, b/c when I started eating right, the muscles were getting bigger as the fat stores were getting smaller. When it was just working out with poor diet, all those gains in muscles and definition was still obscured by a fat layer.
        Standard American Diet + working out = muscles getting bigger, no fat loss.
        Paleo Diet = fat stores reduced steadily over time
        Paleo Diet + Workout = fat stores reducing + muscles getting bigger.
        Maybe it's the illusion of faster gains? I don't know, but it's worked pretty well for me, and it's been doing both fat loss and muscle gain at the same time. And with both things taking place at once, I've gotten a lot more comments about my improved appearance, which is always nice...
        Try it for 30 days; what do you have to lose?

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        • #5
          I think you ought to read the book and respond to that, instead of asking questions about myths you've heard. Mark never claims hard workouts are needed for weight loss, recommends that you DONT work out every day, etc. Basically, every word of your post is wrong, start again, read the book.
          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by darthgall View Post
            Sample size of one here... but for me, just working out hard on a poor diet got my muscles to grow, and I got stronger, but I never saw much definition in the muscles until I started to eat right, b/c when I started eating right, the muscles were getting bigger as the fat stores were getting smaller. When it was just working out with poor diet, all those gains in muscles and definition was still obscured by a fat layer.
            Standard American Diet + working out = muscles getting bigger, no fat loss.
            Paleo Diet = fat stores reduced steadily over time
            Paleo Diet + Workout = fat stores reducing + muscles getting bigger.
            Maybe it's the illusion of faster gains? I don't know, but it's worked pretty well for me, and it's been doing both fat loss and muscle gain at the same time. And with both things taking place at once, I've gotten a lot more comments about my improved appearance, which is always nice...
            Try it for 30 days; what do you have to lose?
            Cool, except that for plenty of people work out+extremely high carb diet=Muscle growth and fat loss also.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tfarny View Post
              I think you ought to read the book and respond to that, instead of asking questions about myths you've heard. Mark never claims hard workouts are needed for weight loss, recommends that you DONT work out every day, etc. Basically, every word of your post is wrong, start again, read the book.
              Say something more convincing to get me to read the book.

              Comment


              • #8
                No where does Mark say - work out obsessively/very hard.

                He advocates slow movement and lifting heavy things - if you feel like it.

                SOme folk do, some folk don't - same with everything primal - its all down to YOU and want YOU want to achieve.

                I like feeling strong so I do a few reps of body weight exercises a few times a week and I walk my dogs every day - body fat (female 5ft 6&1/2 inches) is at 20% heading towards 19% fat.

                I used to run 36+ miles a week, hard core boot camp 4 x a week, and lived on 1500 cals or below - body fat was 22%.

                I'm now on around 1500-2000 a day and body fat has dropped.

                Proof is in the pudding for me.

                Make a choice, read the Blueprint, decide whether you want to lift heavy things or not - no one will make you.

                Its about your goals, your choices.

                I wanted to stop dieting and exercising excessively and I have.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Primal_alien View Post
                  Say something more convincing to get me to read the book.
                  The focus of the Primal Blueprint is NOT weight loss; it's good health. The healthy weight loss (OR maintenance, OR weight gain, in some cases) is a side-effect.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Primal_alien View Post
                    Say something more convincing to get me to read the book.
                    ...what??

                    even most body-building fat loss/muscle-building routines advocate 30% calories from protein, easy on the carbs.

                    no one advocates doing heavy workouts every day. they do advocate being physically active (which is not equivalent to 'working out') every day. there is no such 'myth.'

                    also, personally, i worked out with silly machine weights at the gym before going primal but could never actually build muscle or strength. then when i started eating primally (meaning i was eating a lot more protein, much fewer carbs), i built muscle and strength just from doing yoga.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Uhm, the PB excersise program is easier than a CW excersise program and 3x less time consumming. It emphasises fun, intensive approach + pleasure activities over pointless torture of regimented cardio and endurance training.

                      I was forcing myself to workout 3x a day aiming for 3 hours a day on CW, and now I am down to ~ 1 hour a day 3x a week lifting heavy weights, and the rest is just strolling, playing with my kid and if I feel like it an intense short 30 min or under swim, run, KB, bike, climb, whatever.... I even count running a city block to catch my bus as a Fight or Flight sprint!

                      PB approach to excersise is the easiest and most pleasurable approach!!!
                      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The reason to read the book is to get your facts straight about what Mark says.

                        You obviously do not have to agree with it, but if you are going to start your argument by saying something that is the polar opposite of what the book/Mark advocates then you don't really have an argument at all.

                        Mark's book advocates to stop excessive workouts and to start smart workouts. His basis is to think of what our very early ancestors likely did and try to emulate it. While it can be argued that Mark may not be 100% correct in his assumptions I think we can see that it is more likely that "Grok" spotted, chased, and killed dinner then carried it home than that he picked up a big rock and did bicep exercises with it.

                        Mark never says his way is the only way to do it.
                        Chris
                        "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass. It is about learning to dance in the rain."
                        Unknown

                        My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread36279.html

                        My "Program": doing my version of a 4:3 - 3 day fast diet with real food every day, with a little twist of anti-inflammatory mixed in.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Primal_alien View Post
                          Why are are very hard work outs necessary if a primal blueprint diet is so successful?

                          I understand the reasoning behind the diet is to emulate the diet of our paleolithic ancestors, which we are supposedly best adapted to (a matter of speculation, actually, but still a very interesting proposition).

                          But why then must we engage in very difficult, heavy compound exercises almost every day of the week if said diet is so successful at stemming body fat formation?

                          If it is heavy compound movement that is burning body fat, couldn't we theoretically be on ANY diet and see similar results?

                          As a matter of fact I know more people than I can count on extremely high carb diets who gain muscle and lose fat, and these people are all age groups, not just younger people.

                          I am not against Marks message, I just think it gets lost in the translation when people claim a primal blueprint diet makes it easier to burn fat when doing heavy resistance exercises than any other diet would. I don't see this as true. Help me realize why I might be wrong?
                          I think you don't really have a good conception of what most people on these boards do, or what the book advocates. Sure, there are some paleos/primals out there who are really into Crossfit 5 days a week and what have you, but they are by no means in the majority. The appeal of the Primal Blueprint is that you can get results with not all that much effort. For the past few months I've been following the diet, going on long walks (45 min - 2 hrs a session, depending on what I want to do), doing body weight training 2-3 times a week (about 20 min a session), sprinting once a week (about 30 min a session, depending on the protocol), and finding some new, fun, and physical to do once a week. If I'm feeling tired, I rest. Sometimes I'll take the better part of a week off. And I'm seeing steady gains and improvements. Does any of that, all of which conforms to PB principles, sound "extremely hard"?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by demuralist View Post
                            The reason to read the book is to get your facts straight about what Mark says.

                            You obviously do not have to agree with it, but if you are going to start your argument by saying something that is the polar opposite of what the book/Mark advocates then you don't really have an argument at all.

                            Mark's book advocates to stop excessive workouts and to start smart workouts. His basis is to think of what our very early ancestors likely did and try to emulate it. While it can be argued that Mark may not be 100% correct in his assumptions I think we can see that it is more likely that "Grok" spotted, chased, and killed dinner then carried it home than that he picked up a big rock and did bicep exercises with it.

                            Mark never says his way is the only way to do it.
                            ^This^ The PB is about smart, efficient exercise, NOT working out hard every day. Where did you get that OP? That's the whole point - if you eat well and work out smart, you don't have to spend a lot of time working out.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Personally, I work out very sporadically, but the impact of primal eating means I've gained muscle with ease (a few kettlebell swings, a few pushups, etc) whenever I feel like it. I don't know where you're getting the impression that you have to work out so much.

                              Maybe you're just looking at the people that are really trying to see how far they can push their fitness?

                              In any case, I am way too busy between work and home life to work out with any rigorous program, but I'm fit, trim and continuing to gain muscle. Dumping grains has been 90% of everything for me. I'd suggest reading the book.
                              Life is short: Void the warranty.

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