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  • Off-season training

    Now that I'm officially finished with my sport that requires long periods of practice, I'm ready to dive straight into Primal workouts. I am a typical gym junkie and really love going to the gym. I was wondering if anybody could give me some feedback regarding my new exercise schedule, which is a huge cutdown from my two-trips-to-the-gym-per-day schedule:

    Mon: 45 minute boot camp
    Tues: lower body powerlifting (deadlifts, snatches, and squats), up to 45 minutes
    Wed: upper body weights (bench press, triceps dips, chest press), up to 45 minutes
    Thurs: 50 minutes step aerobics
    Fri: rest
    Sat: Sprints, upper body, up to 20 minutes including warmup
    Sun: Sprints, lower body, up to 20 minutes including warmup
    My chocolatey Primal journey

    Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

  • #2
    not sure what the monday boot camp is all about but you could probably get rid of that, and get rid of either saturday or sunday. get rid of thursday too...

    Focus on intensity, not how often you work out. Lift really heavy twice a week, spend yourself thoroughly doing sprints/HIIT once a week, focus on your food and your personal life every other day. You can do small workouts daily if you really wish to but it seems to me like you're going from doing wayyyyyyyyyyy too much to doing wayyyy too much. There's a difference.
    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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    • #3
      I guess I am too used to doing 60+ minutes of exercise every day XD

      Thank you for the feedback. I really love the bootcamp, which is pretty much circuit training with calisthenics and plyometrics in a group setting, which I love, so I'll just leave that. I'll also get rid of the Thursday and Saturday workouts, and move Tues/Wed to Wed/Thurs. I think it should be enough rest, right? =)

      Edited:

      Mon: 45 min boot camp
      Tues: rest
      Wed: lower body powerlifting
      Thurs: upper body lifting
      Fri: rest
      Sat: rest
      Sun: sprints

      Sound reasonable?
      My chocolatey Primal journey

      Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
        I guess I am too used to doing 60+ minutes of exercise every day XD

        Thank you for the feedback. I really love the bootcamp, which is pretty much circuit training with calisthenics and plyometrics in a group setting, which I love, so I'll just leave that. I'll also get rid of the Thursday and Saturday workouts, and move Tues/Wed to Wed/Thurs. I think it should be enough rest, right? =)

        Edited:

        Mon: 45 min boot camp
        Tues: rest
        Wed: lower body powerlifting
        Thurs: upper body lifting
        Fri: rest
        Sat: rest
        Sun: sprints

        Sound reasonable?
        Yep! Also don't be afraid to mix it up some, like if you find yourself utterly bored, with no plans, and you've already taken care of other shit, and you have a burning desire to go out and kill yourself exercising -- go ahead! Similarly, if you're scheduled to work out but it's not feasible for whatever reason just rest and do it the following day. It's called the off season for a reason, so dial back some.
        Last edited by iniQuity; 09-19-2011, 01:30 PM.
        I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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        • #5
          BODY BY SCIENCE (VIDEO 3): “CARDIO”
          Meet Staci: Your New Powerlifting Super Hero | Nerd Fitness

          Lift heavy ass weights and get as strong as you can. Keep a workout log to track your progress. Do the other things if they make you feel better; stress relief is as good of a reason as any to do a physical activity.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
            I guess I am too used to doing 60+ minutes of exercise every day XD

            Thank you for the feedback. I really love the bootcamp, which is pretty much circuit training with calisthenics and plyometrics in a group setting, which I love, so I'll just leave that. I'll also get rid of the Thursday and Saturday workouts, and move Tues/Wed to Wed/Thurs. I think it should be enough rest, right? =)

            Edited:

            Mon: 45 min boot camp
            Tues: rest
            Wed: lower body powerlifting
            Thurs: upper body lifting
            Fri: rest
            Sat: rest
            Sun: sprints

            Sound reasonable?

            You may want to consider a no structure format for a while. You just got through with a long "season" of training and racing. Let your hair down and relax. Reconnect with friends you don't see very often. Let your body tell you when it wants to work out for at least a month. I have seen too many folks burn out way too soon as a result of "endless season" training.

            Do something spontaneous and fun that's a little athletic. I like to join an indoor rock climbing gym in the off season for the challenge and fun of it.

            All intensity all the time will burn you out, I would slip a long hike or walk in there during the week. Two hours if you can spare the time.

            Dave

            Good luck.

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            • #7
              I enjoy my bootcamp and the powerlifting the most. I feel obligated to continue with the upper body strength to even things out, and my friend wants to do sprints with me on Sunday mornings since I usually come up with good workouts for the both of us that challenge us equally despite her being out of shape.

              Is it too much if I do powerlifting every other day so that I can practice my snatch form? XD
              My chocolatey Primal journey

              Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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              • #8
                When do you move slowly for long periods? Don't forget to walk. Really.

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                • #9
                  My moving slowly is biking really slowly to and from work, each way about 20 minutes. I don't count it as >75% max heart rate cardio because I hardly feel like I need to breathe harder when I'm biking.
                  My chocolatey Primal journey

                  Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                    Is it too much if I do powerlifting every other day so that I can practice my snatch form? XD
                    Evidence-Based Resistance Training Recommendations: Part 1 | Drew Baye's High Intensity Training
                    In the earlier half of the last century athletes avoided strength training because they believed it would make them slow and inflexible, a condition referred to as being “muscle-bound”. This perception started to change in the 1950′s, and having previously avoided strength training most athletes and coaches had little or no knowledge of how to train and turned to the Olympic lifters, wrongly assuming their expertise in competitive weight lifting would apply to the training of other athletes. This is where a lot of the misconceptions about lifting speed and explosiveness come from and the reason football players and other athletes are often told to perform power cleans and other quick lifts which are primarily skill based movements which have nothing to do with the skills of their sport and are relatively poor ways of building strength in the muscles involved.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by js290 View Post
                      This is where a lot of the misconceptions about lifting speed and explosiveness come from and the reason football players and other athletes are often told to perform power cleans and other quick lifts which are primarily skill based movements which have nothing to do with the skills of their sport and are relatively poor ways of building strength in the muscles involved.
                      Ever heard of the sport called dragon boat? It requires explosive power when paddling in such a small space using the core, while a typical sprinting race is hardly over 2 minutes. Would power lifts still be a poor way of building strength with those particular muscles for this sport?
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                      Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                        Ever heard of the sport called dragon boat? It requires explosive power when paddling in such a small space using the core, while a typical sprinting race is hardly over 2 minutes. Would power lifts still be a poor way of building strength with those particular muscles for this sport?
                        Start thinking about your skills and your conditioning separately. All the things you're talking about are skills specific to your sport. If you want to get good at your sport, practice the relevant and specific skills. The question becomes how best to condition yourself so you can be best prepared to train your skill? Once you understand the metabolic pathways, the answer becomes clear: you have to train the Cori Cycle. That is, your anaerobic metabolism because the byproducts of anaerobic metabolism drives aerobic metabolism. Your fast twitch muscle fibers are completely anaerobic due to the lack of mitochondria. The paper that Drew Baye references talks about muscle fiber recruitment. The famed Tabata paper talks about anaerobic pathway improvements. To avoid equivocation, it should be noted that high intensity refers to intensity of effort.

                        Something to keep in mind is our bodies are amazingly efficient. It will always use the least amount of energy possible to get something done; that's what it means to get good at a particular skill. The only way you're going to recruit all available muscle fibers is to load it in such a way where you have no choice but to use it all. Think fight-or-flight response.

                        Quoting Drew Baye again:
                        The focus during exercise should not be on lifting as much weight as possible, which requires moving in a way that makes the exercise easier, but on using the weight to challenge the muscles as effectively as possible, which requires moving in a way that makes the exercise harder. The only people who should perform one repetition maximums are competitive lifters. There is no good reason for anyone else to do so.
                        So, I'm not sure how useful snatches would be for your particular sport. Because as you get better and better at snatches, you're body is using just enough muscles to make that lift happen. And, are those the same muscles you need for rowing? I don't know. Now, if by "power lifts" you mean dead lift or squats, that's something else completely. If you can only do one exercise, make it dead lifts. My friend pointed out it's the only exercise where you're simultaneously working opposing muscle groups at the same time. But that's the difference... getting good at dead lifts means working as many muscle fibers as possible.

                        Learn how to do proper resistance training so that you increase your overall strength without injuring yourself. Use your new found strength and improved conditioning to get better at rowing.

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                        • #13
                          Well I do notice that the better I get at snatches, the stronger my legs and hips become in paddling with correct form and being able to exert more power into my strokes. But all the information you just gave me is really useful, and I'll give deadlifts a lot more consideration now that what you said makes a lot of sense to me. I'll go read that study more in detail and plan my workouts accordingly. Thank you for your insight!

                          edit: I read the article, and it was very informative. I personally love doing snatches, but seeing that they're not very beneficial except to Olympic lifters who are training specifically for it, it's kind of depressing for me. It shouldn't be too terrible if I continue doing them with proper form for fun, right?
                          Last edited by sakura_girl; 09-21-2011, 09:15 AM.
                          My chocolatey Primal journey

                          Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                            Well I do notice that the better I get at snatches, the stronger my legs and hips become in paddling with correct form and being able to exert more power into my strokes.
                            It is indeed the strength gains that transfer to your skills. So, yes, getting better at snatches means you're getting stronger. The question is whether it's the most optimal way to get stronger for the skill you are interested in.

                            Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                            It shouldn't be too terrible if I continue doing them with proper form for fun, right?
                            As long as you're not getting injured doing them. An activity that is "fun" is reason enough to do it.

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