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Bulking a boy . . .

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  • #46
    I haven't really read the whole thread, but wanted to add my two cents.

    I was always big growing up, and I liked it. I started late in football because I was so big (mom didn't want me playing with kids 4 years older than me because of weight limits) so as soon as I got into high-school I hit the gym hard trying to bulk up even more. I was benching 300 and squatting 500 as a sophomore in HS. Guess what? I haven't grown an inch since I was a sophomore in HS. Stopped right at 6'1". Everyone thought I was going to be at least 6'4"- 6'5". I can't say for sure doing all that training and lifting stunted my growth, but it sure seems a likely suspect. I would have much rather put on a few more inches and waited to worry about the muscle later.

    Basically what I'm saying is: don't mess with a good thing.

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    • #47
      Lifting weight doesn't stunt growth. Full stop.

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      • #48
        Organic whole milk and lots of it (3+ gallons a week) would do the trick. Beyond the calories and fat milk has amazing (and somewhat scary in some regards) growth promotion effects. Studies apparently liken increased testosterone levels to milk intake which lends itself to more muscle gain.

        for a growing boy milk does a body good.
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        • #49
          Originally posted by TheFastCat View Post
          Organic whole milk and lots of it (3+ gallons a week) would do the trick. Beyond the calories and fat milk has amazing (and somewhat scary in some regards) growth promotion effects. Studies apparently liken increased testosterone levels to milk intake which lends itself to more muscle gain.

          for a growing boy milk does a body good.
          I've read it was the increase in insulin, not testosterone, which is related to the resulting weight from consuming milk? Because of the sugars in milk, which are designed to help a calf grow rapidly, there are corresponding rises in insulin which helps those baby cows pack on several hundred pounds in a year's time. As for humans, cow's milk doesn't work quite as efficiently (raw or pasteurized) and helps pack on bodyfat moreso than LBM. One advocate of the raw milk + protein powder diet in the 50s, 60s, Vince Gironda, died of a massive heart attack.

          And the proteins in milk have been linked to Type 1 diabetes...in children and even teens, the body "sees" the proteins in milk as 'foreign' and attacks those but also ends up destroying the pancreas as well.

          Just my $.02, but, I'd think eggs, meats and a very limited amount of dairy along with vegetables, etc., along with a productive training program is the best bet.

          Again, one person's opinion... )

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          • #50
            The growth promotion effects of milk aren't solely tied to the macro nutrient content/ratio. Many people assume this. Cow milk, more than other protein sources, is a growth (and cancer some reports suggest) promoter owing to the other stuff in it. Robb Wolf talks about this pretty at length in his pod casts.

            I would argue (and I think Mark Rippetoe) that there isn't a better post-workout meal for growth (read:strength) promotion than whole milk. Your body needs an insulin spike here - the sugars are used for muscle glycogen, the protein for rebuilding.

            HOWEVER It is important to understand that milk is more than the sugars, fat and protein within it. The real draw is the growth promotion effects stemming from the nutrients within it designed to grow huge, strong cows. Yes not humans - but if the goal is to increase mass (and muscle mass) it's a terrific choice while avoiding frankenfood.

            if you are exercising fasted, regularly and intensely and consuming milk post workout I don't think you need to worry about getting fat. Leaning out is a different matter but this thread is for adding (muscle) mass.

            " the body "sees" the proteins in milk as 'foreign' and attacks those but also ends up destroying the pancreas as well."
            Not everyone has this reaction to dairy (just as with grains). Is it an ideal nutrition source for optimum longevity? No - it is an ideal nutritional source for adding muscle mass in combination with strength training. Let's not forget cruciferous vegetables like broccoli are harmful if consumed "too much" (and probably just about everything else that can be eaten).

            As for humans, cow's milk doesn't work quite as efficiently (raw or pasteurized) and helps pack on bodyfat moreso than LBM
            not my experience at all! Though I would never match dairy consumption with a sedentary lifestyle or without specific strength gain goals.
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            • #51
              Originally posted by celticman View Post
              No one honestly knows what Walker does. To have a lean, extremely muscular physique like his in his late 40s yet he's clean and only does BW exercises?
              He did team sports for most of his young life, and AFAIK, none of his ex-teammates has disputed his account, which I believe he has given multiple times.
              Lifting Journal

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              • #52
                He also claims to have used bread, french fries and M&Ms as fuel during his stint on an olympic bobsled team

                M&M's power Walker's push Fueled by junk food, Viking's sled is 9th - Baltimore Sun
                Currently dabbling in: IF, leangains, Starting Strength, 5/3/1

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                • #53
                  My brother is about the same age as your stepson and is also trying to bulk. My brother isn't huge, but he managed to put on some mass. My brother and I are both naturally skinny and we found that the solution is simple. Eat more. I have to eat at least 5,000 calories a day to gain. I've read about men that have to eat far more than I do. Count his calories and keep adding more until he starts gaining.

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                  • #54
                    Check out this thread about what one year of Starting Strenth did for a 12 year old. A 14 year old would do even better!

                    12-year-old's progress after 1 year on SS

                    "Lift heavy things." Starting Strength was designed for training young football players. Get a barbell and a power rack and the SS book and he can go to town.

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                    • #55
                      Don't get him lifting too much until he finishes most of his growth spurts. I have friends (all over 6 feet) who had their little brother lifting weights by age 10 and he was enormous by age 12. He also ended up being the shortest male in his extended family by six inches.

                      Don't think it was coincidence, either.
                      ----------
                      Primal since August 2012. CW: 317.

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                      • #56
                        I know it's been said already but the key is to work out consistently and eat. When I say eat, I don't mean eat when he's hungry, I mean eat like it's his job. He is growing and very active which requires lots of calories, he has to figure out how to have a calorie surplus despite his growth and activity level. This will likely require him to feel like he's over eating.

                        Starting Strength would be a great program to start with. If he starts now and doesn't see results in the coming months its because he isn't eating enough.

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