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  • The "cambered hand" push-up

    Tim Bathurst of Beast Skills linked to this: The Cambered Hand Push Up on his facebook page. I read about that hand position from Tim first when he recounted his trip to a Circus school where an older hand balancer told him to try his handstands that way. I played around with it and it does feel more stable for a handstand (though I don't have one yet) but never though of doing push-ups the same way. I'll try it when I get home tonight, figured I'd share.
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  • #2
    I've used this technique in handstands a few times (I also saw it on beastskills!) but didn't feel any significant difference. I really haven't played around with it enough to say for sure though.
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    • #3
      I felt that you can use your fingers more to counter-balance but I don't really have a proper handstand yet so I can't say if one position is better than the other. I think in his beastskills post he said the older hand balancer guy said it was a stronger position for the one-arm handstand and that most Chinese gymnasts practice that way.
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      • #4
        i just banged out a quick set of push ups using the cambered hand to try it out. i can definitely see how it would reduce tricep fatigue like he mentioned in the article. i definitely felt it more in my hands and forearms than i usually do. i'll give it more of a try later when i'm not in the middle of an office, but i like what i read. i'm hoping it can help with my handstand because that is piss poor right now.
        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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        • #5
          I naturally do the cambered hand when practicing planches because I feel like it gives me the best stability. I just tried a handstand with it though and actually felt less in control. Not sure why the difference...

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          • #6
            so i tried these with my workout today...much less fatigue in my in my arms until i started reaching the end of my second round (ladders up to 10 and down for 100 each round). i could feel a difference in my shoulders and and chest, and did feel like i could focus more on keeping my torso as rigid as possible...so just about everything in the article worked the way it should for me, even if they were minor differences. one major change was in my hands and forearms; they were on fire.
            i tried the cambered hand doing hspu's, but didn't really like it. i'm still up against a wall for those, but usually i only need it as a guide or to keep me from falling. today, i felt like i was leaning against it more. i'm not sure, but i think it might have something to do with my fingers being closer together, and thus covering less ground area. usually i spread my fingers wide and get a solid push off my fingertips and palms...not to much today.

            i think i'll keep playing around with this. thanks for posting it, iniquity.
            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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            • #7
              n/m.
              Last edited by jhc; 08-17-2011, 09:49 PM.

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              • #8
                Interesting. I have always naturally gravitated towards this position, possible due to a previous wrist injury, so that would make sense.
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                • #9
                  Hmmm. This is the hand position I fall back into when doing fingertip pushups after I max out and want to finish the set. It didn't feel any better than a standard pushup, but my joints are conditioned from martial arts.

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                  • #10
                    When I was in AIT (Army school after basic traning) one of my drill sergeants taught us this. He was a body builder and took a small set of us (I think 10 out of the whole company) and had us do different PT than the rest of the company. We all maxed out our PT tests after 3 weeks. The easiest one was the pushup due to this hand position, IMO. It does help a lot.
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                    • #11
                      In yoga that's called hasta banda, or "hand lock" and it's properly used in just about any situation where the hands are on the ground and there's weight on them. I do find that the activation provides a better-feeling base, especially as you move the weight forward.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AndreaReina View Post
                        In yoga that's called hasta banda, or "hand lock" and it's properly used in just about any situation where the hands are on the ground and there's weight on them. I do find that the activation provides a better-feeling base, especially as you move the weight forward.
                        Interesting, is it something that's been a part of yoga for a long while? Because I'm always curious about "ancient" practices that get forgotten or whatever. I would also assume that if it's been a part of it historically, then they knew of its benefits and it's been tested, etc.

                        I tried it again while practicing handstands against a wall. I feel stronger in the position and able to use my fingers more to find a balance, my problem is still holding on the it without falling back to my feet, which this position doesn't help with at all, but mind you neither does the open palm because it's the heel of the hand that you're supposed to try to dig into the ground to save you. Unless you do something more instinctive such as bucking your arms a bit, but for some reason that never works with me. I'm not sure where my handstand goes wrong, but I'm still trying. I just feel like a noodle every time, and the issue is not my upper body strength but my lack of control over my lower body, at least it feels that way.

                        Anyway, glad you guys tried it out!
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                        • #13
                          im not really understanding what he is doing in the pictures, it looks like he is just curling his fingers so only the tip is touching the ground is that right?
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Gager View Post
                            im not really understanding what he is doing in the pictures, it looks like he is just curling his fingers so only the tip is touching the ground is that right?
                            Sort of. I tried doing it his way, but the way I was doing it before was just trying to curl my fingers up while keeping as much of my palm flat on the floor.

                            Beastskils guide to handstand says the 'sweet spot' or where you should feel or try to place your weight is on top of your knuckles basically. I understand that could be his personal preference, but it also makes the most sense to me as too far into the fingers would be too much pressure/weight to counter-balance while too far back on the heel and it's very tough (for me) to prevent falling back down. So, with that in mind, curling up my fingers allows me to try to place the weight there as I feel stronger if and when I need to push into the ground to prevent over-balancing and having to duck and forward roll, or side-roll.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by iniQuity View Post
                              Interesting, is it something that's been a part of yoga for a long while? Because I'm always curious about "ancient" practices that get forgotten or whatever. I would also assume that if it's been a part of it historically, then they knew of its benefits and it's been tested, etc.

                              I tried it again while practicing handstands against a wall. I feel stronger in the position and able to use my fingers more to find a balance, my problem is still holding on the it without falling back to my feet, which this position doesn't help with at all, but mind you neither does the open palm because it's the heel of the hand that you're supposed to try to dig into the ground to save you. Unless you do something more instinctive such as bucking your arms a bit, but for some reason that never works with me. I'm not sure where my handstand goes wrong, but I'm still trying. I just feel like a noodle every time, and the issue is not my upper body strength but my lack of control over my lower body, at least it feels that way.

                              Anyway, glad you guys tried it out!
                              I don't know how old it is exactly but it's observed in several different traditions which does suggest that it's fairly old. Unfortunately I'm pretty spotty on the history of the whole thing.

                              Originally posted by Mike Gager View Post
                              im not really understanding what he is doing in the pictures, it looks like he is just curling his fingers so only the tip is touching the ground is that right?
                              Get your hands flat on the ground, then try to "grab" the ground. It's an awkward explanation but that's the best I can do.

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