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Weights program for most efficient fat loss

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  • Weights program for most efficient fat loss

    I'm doing a more mass gaining program that requires me to eat a lot. I've been told that it is not the best choice for fat loss. I'm not sure what else to do. Any suggestions?

  • #2
    Fatty Acid Oxidation

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    • #3
      How you work out controls how big your muscles are.
      How you eat controls how much fat you have, with a little bit of influence from how you work out.

      Weightlifting for size means you have to eat a lot to have enough building blocks to repair the damaged muscles. This can make you gain fat, depending on what you are eating and how your body responds to it.

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      • #4
        You need two main exercises:
        1. table push aways: When you start to get full, just push away from the table
        2. Head shakes: when someone offeres you food not on your diet, twist your head right and then left and repeat going 'No thank you'.

        Getting a 6 pack is mostly about losing fat.

        - Lyle McDonald

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        • #5
          Originally posted by reedol View Post
          I'm doing a more mass gaining program that requires me to eat a lot. I've been told that it is not the best choice for fat loss. I'm not sure what else to do. Any suggestions?
          Yes, mass gaining programs are bad for fat loss. lol

          Limit your carbs to 50-100g on non-training days and eat a high carb, high protein meal after lifting weights. And eat primal food .
          Ye shall know them by their fruits.

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          • #6
            Maximal muscle mass gain (in terms of speed of gains) will be accompanied by some fat gain, there isn't really a way around it. You have to eat excess calories (unless you have large fat reserves to burn as fuel) and some of it will inevitably be stored as fat.

            The greater the calorific excess the more likely fat gain there is likely to be. Bearing this in mind, if you are willing to accept slower muscle mass gains, reducing the calorific excess will lead to less fat gain (although some will still occur in most people).

            EDIT: As Laconphile points out, more advanced techniques such as carb/calorie cycling can also help limit fat gains whilst bulking.
            Last edited by maclrc; 08-03-2011, 08:00 AM. Reason: Partial response to further post

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            • #7
              You could do complexes (type of training - look on youtube and t-nation.com for info) for fat loss. I have done them in the past and I didn't see a difference after 8 weeks but that was because my diet was all hosed up.
              I have no idea if complexes will work better for fat loss or not, but it can't hurt to try. The only way I have found to consistently lose fat and keep it off is just to eat Primal. I still do olympic and powerlifting training when I do lift and those are "not for fat loss" either.
              People too weak to follow their own dreams will always try to discourage others.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jfreaksho View Post
                How you work out controls how big your muscles are.
                Actually, your genes determines how big your muscles will get. An average person training without steroids can realistically expect to gain about 1.5-2lbs of lean mass per year. One can increase strength without increasing size; any additional weight is likely just fat.

                Health Correlator: How much dietary protein can you store in muscle? About 15 g/d if you are a gifted bodybuilder

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by js290 View Post
                  1.5-2lbs of lean mass per year
                  At first I thought that number was a bunch of crap, but going back over the last 10 years, it's pretty accurate. Mine is closer to 2.2/year, but my testosterone levels are usually in the very high range (thank you testicles) so I am sorta "like" a steroid-ed gainer, just not as much.
                  People too weak to follow their own dreams will always try to discourage others.

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                  • #10
                    @js290: and yet, others (Lyle McDonald, Mark Rippetoe) show that novice lifters can make gains much in excess of that. What’s My Genetic Muscular Potential? | BodyRecomposition - The Home of Lyle McDonald Ned at healthcorrelator acknowledges that he is talking about protein usage not muscle mass in toto.

                    IME, I'm more in the 2lbs/month in the early stages. Yes, there's some fat gain there as well, but there's a lot of muscle.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Abu Reena View Post
                      @js290: and yet, others (Lyle McDonald, Mark Rippetoe) show that novice lifters can make gains much in excess of that.
                      Do they show trainees who don't make such fantastic gains? Ned talks about protein usage in another post: Health Correlator: How much protein does one need to be in nitrogen balance?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by js290 View Post
                        Actually, your genes determines how big your muscles will get. An average person training without steroids can realistically expect to gain about 1.5-2lbs of lean mass per year. One can increase strength without increasing size; any additional weight is likely just fat.

                        Health Correlator: How much dietary protein can you store in muscle? About 15 g/d if you are a gifted bodybuilder
                        Perhaps I was oversimplifying. Let me try again:

                        Assuming a healthy diet, how you exercise will determine your muscle size, within a range limited by your bone structure and other genetic factors.


                        Is that better?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by js290 View Post
                          Actually, your genes determines how big your muscles will get. An average person training without steroids can realistically expect to gain about [URL="http://skylertanner.com/2011/04/02/the-six-year-itch-or-was-it-all-a-waste-of-time/"]1.5-2lbs of lean mass per year[/URL]. One can increase strength without increasing size; any additional weight is likely just fat.

                          Health Correlator: How much dietary protein can you store in muscle? About 15 g/d if you are a gifted bodybuilder
                          That link is hilarious! Look how weak and scrawny he is! And notice none of his degrees are in anything related to science or health. And how he doesn't actually link to any studies. Or have any experience actually training people!
                          Lifting Journal

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                          • #14
                            And the first link talks about resistance training changing the gene expression to one more favorable to gaining mass!
                            Lifting Journal

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                            • #15
                              All I know is that the next time JS290 puts up that "Fatty Acid Oxidation" video for the 700th time, I'm going to go batshit crazy.

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