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This is a test to see what's wrong with my legs

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  • This is a test to see what's wrong with my legs

    Lie down on your back. Lift one leg up while keeping the leg straight. Do the quads flex much?

  • #2
    Mine do.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Alex Good View Post
      Mine do.
      I wasn't perfectly clear in the first post.

      I'm really referring to the two muscles near the kneecap. The vastus lateralis and the vastus medialis.

      Do they contract even if your leg isn't completely straight? If you life your leg and it's bent say 15 degrees off straight, are the quads near the kneecap still contracting? Are they contracting hard?

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      • #4
        Not hard but there is still a slight contraction.
        In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Alex Good View Post
          Not hard but there is still a slight contraction.
          Thanks. This is one of the few straight answers I've gotten. My lower quads are complete mush unless I fully extend my leg. And they're fairly well defined so it's pretty easy to tell.

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          • #6
            No problem.
            In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

            Comment


            • #7
              There is nothing unusual about what you are describing. The bottom parts of the quads don't cross the hip joint and therefore shouldn't be too active for this movement.
              "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

              "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

              My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com

              sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
                There is nothing unusual about what you are describing. The bottom parts of the quads don't cross the hip joint and therefore shouldn't be too active for this movement.
                But it shouldn't be totally soft should it?

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                • #9
                  I'd really like for more input from people on this. It only takes a second.

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                  • #10
                    It will depend on how tight your hamstrings are. Lifting your leg like that stretches the hamstring (it crosses both the hip and the knee) which exerts a backward pressure on the tibia which needs to be counteracted by the quads. If I don't support my leg the quads tighten to keep the leg straight, but if I hold my ankle and pull it up that way the quad stays soft.

                    EDIT: and yeah, as long as your legs do what you want them to do it's hard to say that you having an atypical morphology means you have something "wrong" with your legs. Worry about doing a movement, getting into a position you want, and let the mind worry about which muscles to fire.
                    Last edited by AndreaReina; 07-28-2011, 04:03 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HelloMeteor View Post
                      But it shouldn't be totally soft should it?
                      It is what is it. There is nothing wrong with you.

                      Originally posted by AndreaReina View Post
                      Worry about doing a movement, getting into a position you want, and let the mind worry about which muscles to fire.
                      +1
                      "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

                      "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

                      My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com

                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I concur that this tests/stretches your hamstrings (called a straight leg raise or leasegue's test/sign). You should be more interested in any differences between the hip joint angle between right and left when keeping your knee totally straight. Any difference suggests some sort of imbalance. This can also test for a herniated disc and is a positive test if you get significant burning through the back of your leg between 30-70 degrees of hip flexion (while maintaining 0 degrees of knee extension/straight knee).

                        The straight leg raise is also used as an open chain strengthening exercise for the quads in rehabing patients who have had some sort of knee surgery (knee replacement, ACL reconstruction, meniscectomies). Being unable to maintain full knee extension suggests quad weakness (called quad lag), however, this exercise is performed well within the limits of hamstring extensibility so they do not effect quadricep activation.

                        Edit: also used for patients who have had hip surgery/deficits in hip flexion strength

                        I'd only be concerned if you have noticeable functional strength loss, or atrophy in your quads between the right and left. This would suggest the presences of some sort of pathological process.
                        Last edited by jswanz1; 07-28-2011, 07:02 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Al_Kavadlo View Post
                          It is what is it. There is nothing wrong with you.



                          +1
                          The problem is that it feels wrong and different than it used to. Squatting feels doesn't feel right, and it feels like my knees are bent inward, or like there is a similar out of alignment between the upper and lower legs.

                          It's not that something looks wrong and that's what worries me. It's that something feels wrong and ALSO looks wrong.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by AndreaReina View Post
                            It will depend on how tight your hamstrings are. Lifting your leg like that stretches the hamstring (it crosses both the hip and the knee) which exerts a backward pressure on the tibia which needs to be counteracted by the quads. If I don't support my leg the quads tighten to keep the leg straight, but if I hold my ankle and pull it up that way the quad stays soft.

                            EDIT: and yeah, as long as your legs do what you want them to do it's hard to say that you having an atypical morphology means you have something "wrong" with your legs. Worry about doing a movement, getting into a position you want, and let the mind worry about which muscles to fire.
                            My quads are super soft unless my leg is completely straight. This seems abnormal.

                            I'm not looking for something to be wrong. I know there is something wrong, and I'm looking at this feeling and appearance of abnormality in the quads as a possible indication of what's really wrong elsewhere.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jswanz1 View Post
                              I concur that this tests/stretches your hamstrings (called a straight leg raise or leasegue's test/sign). You should be more interested in any differences between the hip joint angle between right and left when keeping your knee totally straight. Any difference suggests some sort of imbalance. This can also test for a herniated disc and is a positive test if you get significant burning through the back of your leg between 30-70 degrees of hip flexion (while maintaining 0 degrees of knee extension/straight knee).

                              The straight leg raise is also used as an open chain strengthening exercise for the quads in rehabing patients who have had some sort of knee surgery (knee replacement, ACL reconstruction, meniscectomies). Being unable to maintain full knee extension suggests quad weakness (called quad lag), however, this exercise is performed well within the limits of hamstring extensibility so they do not effect quadricep activation.

                              Edit: also used for patients who have had hip surgery/deficits in hip flexion strength

                              I'd only be concerned if you have noticeable functional strength loss, or atrophy in your quads between the right and left. This would suggest the presences of some sort of pathological process.
                              Well there is SOMETHING wrong, because they feel totally out of whack.

                              Whatever is happening, is happening to both legs.

                              I can maintain full leg extension, but not with my quads. It feels like it's my IT band that's holding my lower leg up.

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