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  • build muscle lose fat

    so i am trying to preserve/build more muscle mass while eliminate body fat (goal to get a six pack eventually) what should i keep my macros at. i am pretty active i do some sort of cardio in the am and weight lift in the pm. what do you guys think? i weigh in at about 164 if that helps for a 5' 10 guy

  • #2
    I think you should read the book.
    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

    Comment


    • #3
      which book?

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      • #4
        I love you.
        You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

        Comment


        • #5
          im confused

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          • #6
            I think Grumpy's referring to The Primal Blueprint.
            Just a guess =)
            "You can always do more than you think you can !" Sensei Scash

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            • #7
              Read the book, read the site. Read Primal Blueprint Fitness. Then you'll understand.
              It's not about the macros or a specifically designed exercise.

              You clearly aim to get a six-pack, a nice goal, but not easy to get to. First you have to balance your fitness level, and fitness is not a destination that you pack up some things and go there, it's more like a journey where you have to keep digging up and learning more.

              But to summarize and save you some work. Go low-carb/high-fat/high-protein/no processed foods and go for compound exercises like chin-ups, squats, deadlifts. No need for abwork. Keep doing it and eventually you will get your six-pack.

              Hope it helps.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BBam View Post
                Read the book, read the site. Read Primal Blueprint Fitness. Then you'll understand.
                It's not about the macros or a specifically designed exercise.

                You clearly aim to get a six-pack, a nice goal, but not easy to get to. First you have to balance your fitness level, and fitness is not a destination that you pack up some things and go there, it's more like a journey where you have to keep digging up and learning more.

                But to summarize and save you some work. Go low-carb/high-fat/high-protein/no processed foods and go for compound exercises like chin-ups, squats, deadlifts. No need for abwork. Keep doing it and eventually you will get your six-pack.

                Hope it helps.
                Well said.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I was 164 at 5'11 seven weeks ago at 11% BF. Now I am below 9%, with the six-pack getting sharper by the week. Leangains, do the research. I don't even follow it to the letter macro-wise, because of Paleo (high fat). I think it's mostly the 16/8 fasting that does it. Lift hard, cut the cardio except for walking, and up your carbs postworkout.
                  Last edited by RezH; 05-09-2011, 08:41 AM.

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                  • #10
                    As someone else said ...

                    Abs are made in the kitchen.
                    It is generally fairly difficult to build muscle while losing fat, mostly because building muscle requires a surplus of protein, and surplus protein has several pathways for disposal including increased protein synthesis, increased thermogenesis, and increased gluconeogenesis. Ideally, all the protein you ingest would go towards increased synthesis, but you cannot control that. Increased thermogenesis is ok, because you will only find your body temperature rising, which is neither here nor there, unless your increased temperature interferes with other things, such as sleep, for example. Increased gluconeogenesis is not so great, because one way glucose is stored is as adipose tissue. Depending on your specific metabolism, meal composition, and a host of other factors, your body will apportion its protein intake to one of the disposal pathways, and it's pretty much a crap shoot as to how it will ultimately go. I certainly cannot predict this for you, and I doubt that you can either.

                    If, on the other hand, you are interested in maintaining muscle while losing fat, that is a far more achievable goal, and it primarily has to do with meal timing and the hormonal effects of intermittent fasting. In a nutshell, every time you have a meal, you raise insulin levels which shuts off the release of fat from your adipose tissue. This effect lasts on the order of six hours, at which point, you are back to subsisting on your adipose energy store ... unless you eat again, at which point, you go back to storing fat rather than consuming it. The name of the game, therefore is to not do this. Take a look at the links in my signature for the full details.

                    -PK
                    My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

                    Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Here's my summary

                      Please correct if I am in error on any of these points or have forgotten something important:

                      Primal Blueprint 101 | Mark's Daily Apple

                      Definitive Guide: The Primal Blueprint | Mark's Daily Apple

                      How to Eat According to the Primal Blueprint | Mark's Daily Apple

                      Some people say that with regard to grains and sugars, easing into PB is a lot easier than shock therapy, in other words, that it is easier to gradually ease off on the grains and sugars than to eliminate them at once. That's what I did. I eliminated bread and so on, but I ate rice. Then I eliminated the rice. I eliminated the sugar (all of it coming with grains) right away.

                      A quick summary would be:
                      1. Eliminate grains. No more bread, cookies, chips, crackers, cereal. Grain = sugar.
                      2. Eat sufficient protein to keep up your lean body mass. Get it as animal protein, in particular high-fat red meat. All the fat, all the time. Bacon-wrapped porterhouses fried in coconut oil are a good idea.
                      3. Eat plenty of saturated fat -- get most of your calories from them. Coconut oil and animal fat are often recommended.
                      4. Eat fresh vegetables and some fruit to get a small amount of carbs (not actually that small at 50-100 g./day, though -- it's just not the 60% from carbs that mainstream "nutritionists" often recommend). Don't eat great amounts of sweet fruit. Eat berries.
                      5. Avoid starchy foods such as potatoes, too, or greatly reduce them.
                      6. Eliminate or greatly reduce dairy. If you do eat it, it's probably better to consume the high-fat varieties (e.g., a pat of butter on that porterhouse) or fermented dairy such as kefir. Permanently can low-fat or reduced-fat dairy.
                      7. Eliminate sugar, honey, etc. or greatly reduce.
                      8. Do fairly regular low-intensity exercise such as walking.
                      9. Avoid "chronic cardio" (frequent long exercise with elevated heart rate, aka "aerobics"). Don't run, bike, etc. at high speeds regularly. But do sprint every so often (see below).
                      11. Do occasional sprinting, like once a week or once every ten days or so. More, maybe, if you can tolerate it and like it, but don't overdo it.
                      12. Do some heavy lifting and whole body exercises such as push-ups and pull-ups to develop physical strength and fitness. Avoid exercises that make you feel sick or that stress your body in mechanical ways. No running on a timer or treadmill crap. Do sports, do things that are fun, do things that make your body feel good. Keep the intensity low unless it is very brief.
                      13. Get adequate sunlight and fresh air.
                      14. The beef and pork and chicken should be "natural" as much as possible -- think grass fed, well-treated animals, free-range, cage-free, etc.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pklopp View Post
                        As someone else said ...



                        It is generally fairly difficult to build muscle while losing fat, mostly because building muscle requires a surplus of protein, and surplus protein has several pathways for disposal including increased protein synthesis, increased thermogenesis, and increased gluconeogenesis. Ideally, all the protein you ingest would go towards increased synthesis, but you cannot control that. Increased thermogenesis is ok, because you will only find your body temperature rising, which is neither here nor there, unless your increased temperature interferes with other things, such as sleep, for example. Increased gluconeogenesis is not so great, because one way glucose is stored is as adipose tissue. Depending on your specific metabolism, meal composition, and a host of other factors, your body will apportion its protein intake to one of the disposal pathways, and it's pretty much a crap shoot as to how it will ultimately go. I certainly cannot predict this for you, and I doubt that you can either.

                        If, on the other hand, you are interested in maintaining muscle while losing fat, that is a far more achievable goal, and it primarily has to do with meal timing and the hormonal effects of intermittent fasting. In a nutshell, every time you have a meal, you raise insulin levels which shuts off the release of fat from your adipose tissue. This effect lasts on the order of six hours, at which point, you are back to subsisting on your adipose energy store ... unless you eat again, at which point, you go back to storing fat rather than consuming it. The name of the game, therefore is to not do this. Take a look at the links in my signature for the full details.

                        -PK
                        so you mean its not about what i eat its about how i space it out and when i eat and you sound like you know a lot, what do you think about macro situation, should i care about my macros or should i just continue to eat healthy with low carb high fat moderate protein?

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                        • #13
                          eliminating a lot of grains i understand but how can that help maintain muscle mass cause it will cause me to be at a caloric deficit unless i am supposed to really increase my fat intake

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                          • #14
                            I use white rice on workout days. Also sweet potatoes. Low carb is fine for rest days, but carbs postworkout are helpful.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RezH View Post
                              I use white rice on workout days. Also sweet potatoes. Low carb is fine for rest days, but carbs postworkout are helpful.
                              i work out mon-friday so i think i just need a good source of carbs postworkout? and lay low on carbs during the weekend?

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