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does fruit replenish muscle glycogen?

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  • does fruit replenish muscle glycogen?

    I heard that it goes straight to the liver, but it sure feels like it replenishes the muscles.

    I'm thinking fruit/simple carbs for during the day, getting you up and running and refueled quickly.

    Rice, potatoes, and other slow burning carbs for around bedtime and for long, extended periods of hard activity.

    This is asuming fruit does refuel the muscles...again it feels like it does IME but i've heard otherwise.

  • #2
    My understanding is that fructose is converted to liver glycogen and stored for later use in the form of glucose derivatives while glucose is converted directly to muscle glycogen for immediate use.

    I think the problem most people are concerned with is related to excess fructose and an already topped-off level of liver glycogen. In this case the fructose would be stored as body fat I believe. Someone correct me if I'm wrong
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    • #3
      Thanks, my question was answered in the duplicate topic I made on the other board. Figured I'd post it twice just to be sure...I was getting mized results with google. It's hard seperating bro-science from fact sometimes.

      But how does one deplete lver glycogen in the first place? Is it used up during excercise too?

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      • #4
        Wikipedia has a diagram even:


        Also, most fruit isn't pure fructose. There's a significant amount of glucose, either free or in the form of sucrose (or, in the case of bananas, starch). And glucose most surely does replenish muscle glycogen stores.

        Liver glycogen is depleted by not eating. Any time when you're not digesting a meal, up until about 12 hours of fasting, you're fueled by liver glycogen. As the muscles start to take up blood glucose to replenish themselves, liver glycogen will be providing whatever glucose isn't coming in from food.
        Last edited by Doddibot; 05-05-2011, 08:59 PM.
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        • #5
          Fructose isn't readily converted into glucose and excess fructose that tops off liver fructose messes with leptin signaling and other health problems. That being said some fruit is fine, obviously. I really don't know how much will top off your liver stores but Robb Wolf did a damn fine job explaining that starchy tubers just do so much better for people than fruit, even if its not a workout thing.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NeoBerserker View Post
            Fructose isn't readily converted into glucose and excess fructose that tops off liver fructose messes with leptin signaling and other health problems. That being said some fruit is fine, obviously. I really don't know how much will top off your liver stores but Robb Wolf did a damn fine job explaining that starchy tubers just do so much better for people than fruit, even if its not a workout thing.
            where can i find said info:?
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            • #7
              Don't know any links on studies sorry. I heard it in several of Robb Wolf's podcast, one epside was 9. But he explains this stuff several times, perhaps you can try searching his site. Also, Matt Lalonde is big on the dangers of too much fructose, maybe search for his stuff too. But basically the way Robb Wolf laid it out it (he explained it using science!) became clear that starchy tubers were superior... er i just tried searching myself and its hard to pull up other episodes besides that one which i previously wrote down. I can't remember every episode where he talks about this stuff.... its not like i write it down..... OK, maybe i am a geek and i do write some of it down, but i'm obviously not very good at it. lol.
              This may help too:
              Fructose

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              • #8
                Are potatoes starchy tubers?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by otzi View Post
                  Are potatoes starchy tubers?
                  No, but potatoes are.
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                  • #10
                    Yes potatoes are, but they are not the best choice and can cause other problems. Yams/ sweet potatoes are best.

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                    • #11
                      Potatoes are stem tubers, whereas sweet potato, cassava and true yams are root tubers. So yes, they're starchy tubers. Some people find potato is better than yams, others find they have problems with nightshades like potato.
                      "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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