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Purchasing first kettlebell!

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  • Purchasing first kettlebell!

    I'm going to Sports Authority tomorrow to purchase my first kettlebell. I've never used a kettlebell, so I figured that I would go somewhere where I could try one out. I've been using 10lbs dumbbells at home - for curling, squatting, lunging, etc, and it's starting to feel too easy. Will a 10lb. kettlebell be a different experience? Should I go for heavier?

    Thanks!
    Visit my blog Primal Homeskillet. And eat it too.

  • #2
    I started with a 15lb which was quickly too easy after I got comfortable with the moves. I got a 25lb instead. I think it was good to learn on a lighter bell, but they do get kinda expensive.

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    • #3
      Start with a 15 pound and get EFFICIENT at all the moves with Perfect form before advancing up in weight. You will eventually want heavier for the two handed swing which is the most fundamental move to master first, and is the foundation for every other move. It also is great for Fat loss. then you will use that 15lb bell for the one handed stuff like swings, cleans and snatches. I agree, they are pricey. I started with 15. Now I have 2 10lbs for double snatches, a 20lb, 25lb and 35lb. It took a year to build up my collection and get effieicent at swinging them. KB's have a totally different weight distribution and will feel much harder than dumbells, as well as give you your cardio all at the same time. a 15 minute KB workout will exhaust you, and build muscle and burn fat all at the same time.

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      • #4
        I bought a 25lb one for my first, to use for two handed swings (a la Tim Ferriss in The 4 Hour Body). It's a good weight for me (50 y.o., 140 lbs, not previously doing any serious lifting).

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        • #5
          I have 2 15-lbs that I use for one-handed or double stuff, a 20-lb that I also use for one-handed stuff, a 25, and a 35. A 10-pound kettlebell will quickly become useless. Do you have an Ocean State Job Lot discount store near you? They sell good KBs at very reasonable prices.
          My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
          On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

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          • #6
            I would also HIGHLY recommended a few sessions with an experienced trainer. Correct form is critical. I travelled an hour and a half to work with an RKC trainer, and it was totally worth it. Dragondoor.com has listings of trainers by state.
            My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
            On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

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            • #7
              Congratulations on making the move to Kettle Bells. If training with an RKC isn't a possibility for you, I'd recommend a few videos/websites for you:

              YouTube - kbellqueen's Channel Lauren Brooks is really inspiring and has text book form (she's an RKC)...my wife also loves the fact that you can see her kids in the background in so many of her videos.

              My Mad Methods - MyMadMethods.com | Kettlebell Exercises

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              • #8
                I'd go at least 15 to start. Ditto on the trainer - someone who is RKC certified if possible. Be careful, kettlebells are addictive. I started off with one and now have 12 of varying weights!
                "Suffer no guilt yee who wield this in the name of Crom"
                Quote on the Father's Sword

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                • #9
                  Thank you everyone for the great suggestions! I know someone who is RKC certified, so I'll go to her right away. I'm really looking forward to doing kettlebell workouts! Again, thanks everyone!
                  Visit my blog Primal Homeskillet. And eat it too.

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