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[sensations] you're looking for when working out

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  • [sensations] you're looking for when working out

    Hi everyone,

    I have no idea whether there has already been a dedicated thread to sensations, but I'd like to ask the question to everybody here, including Mark.

    What are the sensations that you're looking for when you're working out ?

    I ask this question from a technical standpoint. I mean, whatever the exercise you're doing, what kind of ability are you seeking to achieve ? brutal strength ? fullest coordination with as little effort as possible (just like dancing) ?

    For instance, let's stick to isometrics : how do you do your planks (no matter the difficulty) ?
    once you're in position, do you try to squeeze each and every muscle that might get involved in the process of holding it ? or do you feel better if you're trying to relax everything that you can, as long as the form remains perfect (which means you use minimal amounts of strength to get what you need) ?
    I've heard/read so many different things about the way to breathe, the way to "focus" on the core, but in the end, it seems that people tend to emphasize form over sensation. And I've been through different types of training myself (racket sports, gymnastics, weight-lifting, dancing, martial arts, boxing), all of which appear to have different approaches towards "fitness".

    Now, I am a bit confused but I know I seek efficiency and coordination of the whole body.

    I would very much like to hear and discuss what you folks think about it, how you experience whatever training you do.

    -- BTW, do not hesitate to redirect me to a blog post or anything pertaining to that matter

    Thanks.
    ======== ==== == =
    Be hardcore, drink water

  • #2
    Doms?
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    • #3
      It really depends on the individual and the particular exercises being performed. Personally, I aim for efficient movement in most things I do but that can change when I'm doing some 1RM work. Furthermore, if you forego "sensation" and focus on performance this can become a slightly less important concept - at least from a physiological standpoint.
      Sandbag Training For MMA & Combat Sports
      Sandbag Training Guide on Kindle
      The Complete Guide To Sandbag Training
      Brute Force Sandbags
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      • #4
        @Coach Palfrey,
        thanks for your response. I understand your point about performance. Actually, I had been focusing on performance for a couple of years before relaxing and trying to feel everything that I am doing. Then, I discovered that - let's stick to the basic plank example - I could hold the position with a given "quality" in form but I could do it in two different ways : once in position, just hold it, don't think too much about it ; or once in position, try to squeeze the involved muscles even more, get as rigid/stable as possible.

        Do you believe, from your experience, that these are two distinct paths, in terms of results ?
        ======== ==== == =
        Be hardcore, drink water

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        • #5
          If I have time to focus on trying to feel various sensations, then it is time to put more weight on the bar or run faster, in my opinion. My main sensations when exercising are a bit of anticipatory fear (ie damn that bar is going to be heavy, oh this is gonna hurt), then pain, then extreme fatigue.
          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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          • #6
            A focus on proper form should be paramount in any case. It varies from exercise to exercise, but you should always go back to basics. This will prevent injury, and increase performance in the long run. People get into trouble when they go too hard or too heavy too fast.
            Every Day is a New Adventure

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Furan View Post
              @Coach Palfrey,
              thanks for your response. I understand your point about performance. Actually, I had been focusing on performance for a couple of years before relaxing and trying to feel everything that I am doing. Then, I discovered that - let's stick to the basic plank example - I could hold the position with a given "quality" in form but I could do it in two different ways : once in position, just hold it, don't think too much about it ; or once in position, try to squeeze the involved muscles even more, get as rigid/stable as possible.

              Do you believe, from your experience, that these are two distinct paths, in terms of results ?
              Well that would depend on what you class as "results".

              You should take a look into Mihalyi Csiksentmihalyi (pardon the spelling) and the Theory of Flow. He talks about the balance between the demands of a task and the ability of the individual - I think you'll find some interesting relevance to your questions there.

              My personal opinion is that maximum performance comes from "losing" yourself in the technique.
              Sandbag Training For MMA & Combat Sports
              Sandbag Training Guide on Kindle
              The Complete Guide To Sandbag Training
              Brute Force Sandbags
              www.facebook.com/sandbagfitness
              http://fitedia.com/ - Health and Fitness eBooks, video, audio and workshops

              Comment


              • #8
                @tfarny @New Renaissance, thank you for sharing your thoughts.
                @New Renaissance : actually, I went back to basics noticing that I was not making much "global" progress so I believe I got your point.

                @Coach Palfrey : I shall look into it thanks for the reference.

                @ all the others :
                all those in the martial arts, dancing, juggling, or whatever activity involves many many repetitions to learn, what do you think of this discussion ?
                ======== ==== == =
                Be hardcore, drink water

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                • #9
                  I have a Catholic approach to exercise. I don't feel I've done it properly unless I experience some kind of discomfort afterwards.
                  You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Grumpy Caveman View Post
                    I have a Catholic approach to exercise. I don't feel I've done it properly unless I experience some kind of discomfort afterwards.
                    hahahaha +1

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                    • #11
                      LOL @ Grumpy..

                      I just got finished mine. So its fresh.

                      For me, I ensure that my form and pace is correct while doing reps. I work with a personal trainer who also lives in my head for my other 3 workouts per week yelling at me when I go too fast. LOL!

                      I honestly do not think that the majority of people really know how hard to push themselves unless they do work with a personal trainer who can push them to their limits. I've been working with her for 6 months and its only been within the last month or so that I push myself as hard or harder than she pushes me. I see a lot of people at the gym who do not have the proper form when working various machines, I see them going so fast and "short" that I wonder if its a specific technique and wonder how it can be actually working the muscle completely, and I can only imagine that their performance suffers. But I'm the fat lady at the gym, so I'm not about to make any helpful suggestions.

                      During my workout, I push on the reps until I the last 2-3 cause me to feel like I'm going to drop the weight, or I don't feel like I can finish, or if I'm with my trainer I curse her out. I feel the burn in the muscle, during the last set, I'm usually shaking and really pushing it out.

                      I expect pain and soreness for 1-2 days afterwards. I also expect progression and get it!
                      SW: 235
                      CW:220
                      Rough start due to major carb WD.

                      MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
                      Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
                      Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
                      Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
                        Well that would depend on what you class as "results".

                        You should take a look into Mihalyi Csiksentmihalyi (pardon the spelling) and the Theory of Flow. He talks about the balance between the demands of a task and the ability of the individual - I think you'll find some interesting relevance to your questions there.

                        My personal opinion is that maximum performance comes from "losing" yourself in the technique.
                        I second the recommendation to look at Flow Theory. Flow states tend to occur when people are performing to their top level, whether that's for athletes or artists. Interestingly, I first encountered Csikszentmihalyi in a Psychology of Creativity course and recognized it as something that sometimes came out in my writing practice, but the same theory applies to athletics. In my time in martial arts, the most amazing moments came when I reached a flow state, either sparring or working on poomse (forms). I'm now starting to experience them while lifting sometimes too.

                        For me, there's this moment where form clicks perfectly and effortlessly, but effort still exists. The hard work doesn't stop, but it feels like I'm in a perfectly natural and absolutely clear state where the work is welcome and somehow joyful (even if it also hurts).
                        “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                        Owly's Journal

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                        • #13
                          @Owly, @Coach Palfrey,
                          do you have special link recommendations ? videos / talks / good reads ?
                          I guess I could have a look soon, since you're urging me to do so =P I can't wait to see exactly what you mean by flow in sparring and forms. Is it something close to what Miyamoto Musashi describes in the water chapter of the Book of Five Rings ?

                          @elorajade : thanks for sharing your experience. For my part, when I was doing gymnastics, I would have a HUUUGE session on Sundays (5hrs) and then, I'd be like dead for the rest of the week. That lasted three months and then it got better and I would be sore for only four days after sessions
                          ======== ==== == =
                          Be hardcore, drink water

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tfarny View Post
                            My main sensations when exercising are a bit of anticipatory fear (ie damn that bar is going to be heavy, oh this is gonna hurt), then pain, then extreme fatigue.
                            This.
                            In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

                            Comment

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