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Recovery Time after heavy lifting

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  • Recovery Time after heavy lifting

    How long does it take everyone to recover after a heavy lifting session? Not in terms of how many days do you rest, but immediately after your workout, how many minutes does it take you to recover? When I lift heavy, my HR gets up there, and I'm breathing heavy. It can take 20 minutes after the workout to really catch my breath. Anyone else the same?

  • #2
    Recovery time post lifting is directly affected by the intensity of the exercise as well as the physical conditioning of your body.
    So, comparing your lifting regimen to mine is not fair and recovery wont be the same between us. Make sense?

    Now, if you and I did the exact same workout for the same length of time....then our recoveries would directly reflect the physical conditioning of our bodies only. And then you could properly compare recovery time vs each individual


    Anyway, all that aside, I work out at work and drive 50 minutes to my home after working out. This 50 minutes is a great time to recover from my workout. I usually am quite tired physically following a workout with the specific muscle groups I have worked feeling "drained". Especially if its legs day. I sometimes having trouble walking up the steps into my house following a leg workout. So, 50 minutes or so would be what it takes to "revive" me. But Im not in any physical shape to workout again for at least 24 hours...
    If you can just get your....mind together....then come on across to me.....
    James Marshall (Jimi)Hendrix

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    • #3
      I am definitely feeling it for the whole day. It just takes 20 minutes or more to even calm my breathing and, particularly after an upper-body lift, to stop the shaking!

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      • #4
        It's very different for different people, different styles of working out, and especially different intensities. Depending on the workout, I could be recovered in a few minutes, or if I screw up and overtrain, I'm not right for days...
        Lifting Journal

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JenCat View Post
          I am definitely feeling it for the whole day. It just takes 20 minutes or more to even calm my breathing and, particularly after an upper-body lift, to stop the shaking!
          I work out 5-6 days a week and if I lift really heavy or do a lot of pull-ups it takes me a long time to calm my breathing as well and the muscles used feel shaky throughout the days. The hardest recovery for me is full court basketball at night time, after two hours of playing it takes me my whole drive home to get relaxed. But even after that it tends to change my digestion as well as my sleeping pattern for that night.
          "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

          People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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          • #6
            If it was a good session, I'm wrecked for the rest of the day.

            Gordo

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            • #7
              On a good session it takes 3-5 minutes before I can move. When I do the leg press... I can't get out of the chair for that long.

              I won't go back to the leg press for a minimum of 21 days.

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              • #8
                I usually don't feel "normal" till I get some carb in me and a shower, I guess half an hour? Though for the next couple weeks I'll be riding a bicycle 20 minutes home from the gym, we'll see if that helps or causes a crash....
                If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                • #9
                  I am surprised by the experiences - I suppose it depends a lot at which stage you are. Generally recovery will be the more difficult the stronger you are (assuming you are talking a low-rep / high-weight session; high-rep / low-weight dynamics are very different).

                  I tend to do 5x5 as my basic pattern, mainly on the big compound lifts, and I generally go for a straight-set 5x5 PR on every lifting day. I never go to failure, but I know that when I squat 5x5@120kg, that I would not be able to do full 5x5@122.5. I tend to rest 2-3min in between sets, sometimes 4min, but this is plenty to get heartrate down. Whilst it is a strenous effort, it does not consume that much oxygen - after all it is only 25 lifts.

                  Now full "recovery" is obviously a different thing: whilst I might feel pretty fine within 15min after a workout, this does not mean I would be ready to attempt the same even on the day after....

                  Can you give some more specifics of how you are training - as I said, I am really surprised about the heartrate (or rather: the length it takes to come down) if the lift is really heavy / low-reps)?
                  http://thorfalk.wordpress.com

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                  • #10
                    Thor....sounds to me like JenCat is relatively new to lifting (yes/no-JenCat?). If so, I think she is finding out, as most people do after starting, what a cardiovascular workout an intense weight training session can be!

                    JenCat...I would take it slow and allow your body to get in good cardio shape first. That is going to be your limiting factor in determining how much weight you move and how often you move it for the short term. Get acclimated to working with weights around 60% of your one rep max for now. Do sets of ~10 reps and give yourself at least a minute between sets(longer if needed). Work at this pace until you are comfortable following the workout with your breathing and your heart rate. Most importantly, you dont want to be gasping for breath when you start your next set. Do this for a while until you feel like the weights are light and you are ready to go after 1 minute between sets. Once there...its time to up the intensity by starting to move heavier weights (~80% of 1 rep max) for less reps (~6-8 per set) with less rest in between sets (target 30 seconds). When you can do that....you will be in very good shape physically and your body will show it!
                    If you can just get your....mind together....then come on across to me.....
                    James Marshall (Jimi)Hendrix

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                    • #11
                      Actually, I did P90X, P90X+, and other lifting programs for nearly 2 years. I, unfortunately fell into the "women should do lighter weights/higher reps." trap, until fairly recently. I was doing 15 reps for most exercises, but more for push-ups and pull-ups. I am working my way through The New Rules of Lifting. Currently, I'm doing 3 sets of 6 with 105 seconds between sets. Yesterday's workout (for example): squat/one-arm snatch, alternating sets - one-leg Romanian deadlift and bent-over rows, alternating sets - weighted squats (one arm overhead) and incline press, alternating sets: plank (90 seconds) and woodchoppers. I'm using 60lbs for my deadlifts and rows; may not be considered "heavy" as it is only 50% of my body weight, but I'm working on it! I'm just surprised sometimes by the fact that I'm breathing hard during and after lifting. I don't think it's a problem. Just interesting that there's a cardio component to it.

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                      • #12
                        OK...JenCat...thanks for the additional info. With that in mind....I dont think you suffer from what I described in my last post. Well, not exactly. Anyone who has done P90X is not a beginner in fitness AT ALL (I did one 12 week round of it too back in the beginning 2010)!

                        So, from your last post it sounds as though you are hitting it pretty darn hard. Thats awesome!

                        But you are also doing it fairly quickly. 105 seconds isnt a tremendous amount of time between sets. And you have increased the weights from what you were doing previously (i.e. 15 reps per set). So, you are lifting more weight with less time in between your sets than what your body is used to doing. In other words, you are training with a higher intensity now. So your cardio is getting a workout trying to keep up with your new regimen. Thats actually fantastic news. You are getting both an anaerobic workout from the lifting and an aerobic workout with doing it quickly: two birds with one stone.
                        And best of all you are "shocking" your body by changing things up and making it get used to something new (i.e. switching from 15 reps per set with light weight to 6 reps per set with heavier weights).

                        Bottom line is this will probably kick your ass for a while. But the human body is a remarkable machine and I'd expect sooner rather than later your body will get used to even this new routine you are doing. And then you will have to change it up again....but the good news there is you will have a new physique with new muscles to work with for the next change!

                        Sounds like you are on your way. Keep it up and post your progress!
                        If you can just get your....mind together....then come on across to me.....
                        James Marshall (Jimi)Hendrix

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                        • #13
                          Thanks, Nacho! It does feel good, and this program mixes it up, as well. This month it's 3 sets, 6 reps. Next month it's 2-3 sets, 10 reps. w/ 90 second (?) rests between sets. P90X was a really good starting point. Got me doing pull-ups, though I've "lost" them and will have to work back up to them. Someday maybe I'll post pics of the gun show!

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                          • #14
                            Alright, I guess both Nacho and I were a bit on the wrong track here - I guess when you said weightlifting we thought you'd do it powerlifting style rather than CrossFit metcon style. Clearly, anyone doing a weight circuit with controlled breaks will be huffing and puffing like a steam-engine at the end of it :-).

                            What I'd say though is that you could probably benefit from some "real" weightlifting days, either the slow powerlifting style (squat, dead, press) or the fast Olympic style lifts (clean, jerk, snatch) given that you already snatch anyway. On those days you do it with maximal weights and tune the metcon component a bit back.

                            This is the consistent eg with CrossFit programming, and the metcons and lifts are complimentary. You might find it difficult to progress on the lifts if you always pack them into superset metcons and - worse - you might develop some bad form which could lead to injury down the road.
                            http://thorfalk.wordpress.com

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                            • #15
                              Thor, I'll have to do some more research on all this. I have a workout room in my basement, but only have DBs up to 50lbs. (I have other equipment, but no barbells or racks.) I'm thinking that that makes the big lifts next to impossible. I do squats, deadlifts, presses, just not in this stage of the workouts. I'm in Phase 3. There are two sets of workouts that you do 4 times each. So I'll do the exercises listed in the above post, along with those in the second set, for the month, then move on. I try to move slowly on most exercises (not the snatch, obviously).

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