Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Flexibility and nutrition? Other causes for LACK of flexibility

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Flexibility and nutrition? Other causes for LACK of flexibility

    I have NEVER been flexible. I have worked HARD at gettign flexible, and never, EVER got it. Even in high school, when I had 6 years of dance, and four years of track, weight ligting and cheer behind me, with plenty of time and motivation to GET flexible. I never got to a full split, in any form, was never able to drop down and put my hands on the floor. My hamstrings and hips especially are tremendously tight, regardless of how much I work at it.

    Are there any possible nutritional deficiencies that could be the missing key? I can't imagine why it is that after much work-and I'm not talking about 10 minutes here or there, I'm talking serious effort.

    I spent WAY more time working stretches-hips, hams, etc-than anyone else on my various teams, and got far less results.

    Any brilliant ideas as to why? I can't accept that 'some people just can't do it' as a good answer.
    Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

    ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

  • #2
    even though it is advised against in PB the best martial artists got to the point of being able to kick straight up (a standing split) by stretching everyday. also light stretching will do you better than really trying to force it. what do you do for stretches??
    my photo stream
    The Enlightened Warrior

    Comment


    • #3
      Are you drinking enough water?? I did yoga for several years than started loosing flexibility because I was so dehydrated. I'm really bad about drinking fluids. Also dont push yourself into your stretch breathe into it. You will get much more flexible if your not forcing yourself and focus on breathing into the stretch. Hold your stretches for a few minutes. Also we hold a lot of emotional stuff in our hips so if you have a lot going on they might be really tight.

      Comment


      • #4
        I do typical ballet stretching-splits, side, forward, everything you learn in dance class, plus a little martial arts here and there-pretty much everything encompassed here and here.

        I always hold until the 'tension'-for lack of a better word-releases, warm up lightly prior to initial stretching, and I do stretch after work as well.

        No bounce, just light tension. Never to the point of pain, and I'm never truly 'sore' after stretching-just loose. But, there seems to be point at which no matter what I do, I can't get beyond it.

        I was told by various instructors that some people 'just can't', but I'm calling BS. Thoughts?

        Edit to add: MizzH-I have always been pretty good about staying hydrated, and as far as emotional crap...I have my fair share, but I don't know if it's more/less than the so-called 'average bear'....?
        Last edited by Eklecktika; 03-07-2011, 11:26 AM.
        Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

        ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

        Comment


        • #5
          Do you wear high heels often? I wear them daily (I have since high school) and in addition to having a desk job and sitting a lot, I find that my hams are always rediculously tight. I can get some improvement after a moderate stretching session, but I've also never been very "open" and I think that heels are a large part of why.
          5'6" 27 y/o female, Primal 6 months and counting.

          CW: 160 -- in single-digit dress sizes for the first time in 12 years!

          GW: 150 -- for swimsuit season

          Comment


          • #6
            Only on very special occasions-and then I throw caution to the wind and rock my 4"+ KMOAFM shoes. My riding boots don't even qualify as they are quite lowheeled-3/8"-just enough to qualify, and keep the 'tradition police' at bay.

            Most of the time I run around barefoot-even at work/school (I was forever getting 'jacked up' for not having shoes on in school) or in flat huaraches-style shoes-even before they were 'cool'. My oldest pair of sandals are exactly like hauraches. I've limped them along for over 15 years and still wear them.

            One thing I have noticed is that from years and years of reining and WCH, I have a horrible habit of 'rolling my pelvis' under-as if you're trying to hide your pockets. I've only consciously started UNDOing that within the last month or so. Surely that couldn't be the whole problem, could it?
            Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

            ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

            Comment


            • #7
              Try maintaining the tension, instead of the position. Increase the intensity of the stretch as you can without it hurting too much (a little pain is ok). You might be sore the next day -- this is ok, just rest and don't do the stretches (or do them with less intensity).

              As far as nutrition, I hear sulfur is good (think garlic and onion), as are the minerals and aminos in animal joints. Make chicken soup with a whole chicken -- simmer the chicken for a half-hour to an hour, then take it out, let it cool, and shred the meat off the bones. Return the bones to the pot and simmer another four hours or so. Make sure the liquid has some sort of acid -- vinegar, tamarind, tomato, etc -- to better extract the good stuff. Remove the bones, put the meat back in, add any veg you want in there and simmer a final 30 minutes or until the chicken is heated through and the veg cooked. Canned salmon or sardines with skin and bones are also good -- eat the bones, they're soft enough. When you're eating steak, eat the gristle. If making chicken stock, get some feet or heads (ask your butcher) to put in the pot. If making beef stock, ask for gelatinous bones.

              Comment


              • #8
                What kind of weight lifting are you doing? I often notice poor flexibility issues as a result of either poor exercise choice or reduced ROM during said exercises. You mention hips and hams - how is your spinal mobility, shoulder flexibility?
                Sandbag Training For MMA & Combat Sports
                Sandbag Training Guide on Kindle
                The Complete Guide To Sandbag Training
                Brute Force Sandbags
                www.facebook.com/sandbagfitness
                http://fitedia.com/ - Health and Fitness eBooks, video, audio and workshops

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Coach Palfrey View Post
                  What kind of weight lifting are you doing? I often notice poor flexibility issues as a result of either poor exercise choice or reduced ROM during said exercises. You mention hips and hams - how is your spinal mobility, shoulder flexibility?
                  Good, I think...? I don't really know how to test spinal mobility, for example, but I don't have any trouble/pain anywhere, nor do I have rounded shoulders (think lift shoulders, rotate backwards, drop down). I just (as in, end of last week) ditched my office chair in favor of standing. I can lean against the wall, rotate my scaps through a full ROM, and maintain contact-thats the only real test of mobility that I know of for the spine. And, I can do broomsticks at shoulder width plus one hand width on each side-backwards is not a big deal, but back to front is less comfortable-never has been, hasn't worked out yet, I assume for the same reason(?).

                  IOW, I don't have the foggiest if that is good, bad, or 'average'.

                  Re H&H, I do full ATG squats with no problem, and make a regular habit of the socalled indigenous squat -again, no idea whether that is an indicator of anything other than "doing ATG squats with no problem."

                  The large majority of lifting I do is

                  bowflex-based (It was free, and I'm cheap/poor)
                  LHT (haybales (55-60 lbs, deadlift, carry, snatch and throw-extra points for more than two 'layers' overhead) but only once a week
                  saddles (doesn't really count but...50# carried for a hundred yards to and fro adds up),
                  grain (80lb sacks),

                  or homemade/scavenged stuff-tires, poles, etc. Squats are done w/ kettlebells,

                  I do a lot of bodyweight stuff for lack of free weights.



                  Thoughts?
                  Last edited by Eklecktika; 03-07-2011, 01:44 PM.
                  Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

                  ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What specifically do you need more flexibility for?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Because I want to BE more flexible. Function, and injury prevention. I view flexibility as one of those things that 'typically' declines with age, and I've never before been satisfied with 'typical'.

                      When I get to be 60, I don't want to be unable to get on my horse. And by horse, I mean HORSE-warmblood. 5'8 - 5'10" at the shoulder.
                      I don't want to be stuck riding ponies because I can't get on. Or off.

                      I ski, I ride, and I do a fair amount of random $h!t. Being flexible certainly won't hurt.

                      If there IS a particular nutrient deficiency contributing to it, that I'm as of yet unaware of, I'd like to correct it before it causes other imbalances. KWIM?
                      Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

                      ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Are you really strong? I've been told that you are either flexible or strong, but you can't be both....I've always been fairly flexible (double jointed, prone to injury as a result), but kinda whimpy. Maybe you can't have it both ways???.....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sufficent Vitamin D & Omega 3 has made a difference for me. Hydration and good electrolyte balance as well.

                          I used to teach stretching classes and would have my students breathe out and relax into the stretch. Funny how so many of us (accidentally) tense up when we stretch, thus defeating the purpose.

                          And yes, emotional stuff can be huge for many--and you don't have to have a horrible childhood or a huge amount of stress to carry tension in the body. Often we learn habits like sucking in our belly or tucking in our pelvis and it can take some practice to learn new habits.

                          Working with a Feldenkrais practitioner may be helpful here.
                          Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
                          Pregnancy Nutrition Coaching
                          Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by lizpederson View Post
                            Are you really strong? I've been told that you are either flexible or strong, but you can't be both....I've always been fairly flexible (double jointed, prone to injury as a result), but kinda whimpy. Maybe you can't have it both ways???.....
                            That's a common belief, but incorrect. As Coach Palfrey alluded, plenty of weight-bearing exercises require (and develop) a full range of motion to do properly. Check out videos of people doing the Olympic lifts like the snatch, clean and jerk, etc. Also take a look at gymnasts, who have plenty of strength and flexibility.

                            If you're double-jointed and prone to injury it would be a good idea to strengthen the muscles and connective tissue surrounding the joint(s) by working them. Bodyweight exercises like detailed in the PBF e-book are a good place to start, or something like simplefit. Aside from that you'll also need good nutrition, which you'll read a lot about in these forums and on Mark's blog.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lizpederson View Post
                              Are you really strong? I've been told that you are either flexible or strong, but you can't be both....I've always been fairly flexible (double jointed, prone to injury as a result), but kinda whimpy. Maybe you can't have it both ways???.....
                              Ido Portal would like to have a word with you =)

                              YouTube - portaldo's Channel

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X