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What constitutes as heavy lifting?

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  • What constitutes as heavy lifting?



    I keep track of my workouts throughout the week by labeling it either an H day (HIIT/sprint), an L.H. day (lifting heavy), or an M.S. day (moving slowly). My general fitness goal is to get STRONGER and FASTER. Weight loss does not really concern me.


    Lately I've been considering an hour of P90x weight lifting routine "lifting heavy" by using 12 lbs dumbbells, and adjusting the exercises accordingly so I get the most out of it with my weights.


    However, sometimes I'm not sure how to categorize my routines. For example, I just completed this workout:

    20 squats with dumbbell

    10 extended push-ups

    20 single arm dumbbell swings (each side)

    20 walking lunges (each leg)

    20 double arm dumbbell swings

    20 mountain climbers

    10 close push-ups

    20 rows (each side)

    Rest for about a minute or so, then repeat 3x. It took me a little less than a half hour.


    I suppose using your own body weight could be considered "heavy lifting." Right? What do you think?


    Oh, and off topic, went to have some coconut milk in my coffee and it sort of smelt..egg-ish. Does this mean it's spoiled? Didn't taste horribly off...Been in the fridge in a thermos since Monday or so I bet...

    On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

  • #2
    1



    This seems more like it would be in the HIIT category, in that it's primarily aerobic. (Which isn't to say that it won't increase your strength.)


    I don't know that there's any definitive answer to "what is heavy lifting". Heck, for a little old lady, a soup can probably seems like heavy lifting!


    For me, if I can do a particular lift more than 10 times, then I don't consider it lifting heavy.

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    • #3
      1



      Concur with dragonmama. If you can do more than 8 to 10 reps, you're not working hard enough.

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      • #4
        1



        Ohh, good point, I like that. Well, I do end up struggling pretty damn hard to get out my last push-ups, and my rows weren't looking too pretty at the end of the last circuit...


        Now I understand why bodyweight exercises don't really apply to heavy lifting too much. But, couldn't more reps balance it out? If you're working super hard to get through your last rep, shouldn't that be enough?

        On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

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        • #5
          1



          for me lifting is 1 rep.


          Here are some lifts from this week.


          Squat 405

          deadlift 405

          bench press 295

          curl 225

          Shrug 325


          This is pperformed at the maximum point of leverage and I only lift about 1-2 inches for 5-10 seconds.


          The logic is that high weight and location of movement triggers low twitch, high twitch type one and high twitch type two muscles. A failure at this point send the meassge more muscle is required and that triggers growth. Strength goes hand in hand with muscle size.


          I've been doing this for seven weeks and I'm very pleased with my progress.

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          • #6
            1



            I'd still keep intensity high and reps low, as that seems to be the healthiest way to get the best results in the least amount of time. You could:


            - Add more weight to your body (ankle weights, weighted vest, etc)


            - Change positions to get less leverage (for pushups, hands more under your chest than your shoulders)


            - Find new and different exercises, especially ones that rely on doing them for a given amount of time rather than a certain number of reps. These gymnastic routines are absolutely, crushingly brutal IMO:


            http://www.gymnasticbodies.com/articles1.html


            I don't expect to ever make it past the first stage planch ("frog squat" -- love the name!) but if I do, y'all will be the first to know

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            • #7
              1



              Not really, because when you do one exercise after another in rapid-fire fashion or add the reps, it becomes an endurance workout. Lifting a 12 lb dumbbell a hundred times will not give you the same result as lifting a 120 lb barbell 10 times.


              Plus, the idea of a lifting workout is progressive resistance; that is, to work your way up to lifting heavier weights.


              Body weight exercises are fantastic for building strength if done properly, however. Anyone who says otherwise has never met a gymnast! But I don't think most people have the ability to train like a gymnast without having a coach.


              Lifting weights also provides you with a definite, quantifiable way to measure your progress.

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              • #8
                1



                It's just that I'm a little nervous to pick up a barbell again, I've performed deadlifts with them before but I had somebody watching my form. I attempted it on my own again last weekend, and my back was a *bad* sore. So, I've been trying to do more *safe* exercises in order to keep my back intact.


                I suppose I might have to go fill my backpack with sand and see what I can do with that. Has anybody tried the do-it-yourself exercise equipment, such as that pipe with the water in it? Looks interesting AND challenging...

                On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

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                • #9
                  1



                  This is a video similiar to how I do my dead lift. I try and hold for 5-10 seconds. It is probably the safest way to lift. My son is a phys ed teacher and rugby player. He is the one who suggested this method of lifting.


                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZpzW...eature=related

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                  • #10
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                    Lifting heave is lifting heavy weight with low reps... failing on rep 5 max. IMO

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                    • #11
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                      A lot of people would do 3 set of 10-12 reps, try reversing it (with heavier weights of course), 10 sets of 3 reps, Vick above is right heavier weight lower reps will engage more of the Type II muscle fibers...use compound/functional lifts, deadlifts, squats, bench press (bar or dumbbell)


                      The key with deadlifts is bringing those shoulder blades together (keep the upper back tight), keep the lower back with slight inward curve, the bar needs to stay close to the shins, better scraped up shins than a herniated disc...your lower back muscles should be sore the next day if you've done it right...make sure you do them in front a mirror, makes it hard to cheat that way

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Why I use 1 rep is to stimulate muscle growth. Failing on the 5th rep doesn't necessarily mean all the muscle fibres triggered sequentially and then told the brain still not enough grow more.


                        Your muscles will only engage what is required. If all you need to move the weight is slow twitch and fast twitch type 1 then that is all that is triggerd to move the weight then it fails with fatigue. Since type 2 were not triggered there is no message to trigger growth.

                        To make this week's 405 lb deadlift relative... on August 4 my dead lift was 295.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          I didn't say failing (lots of folks, Dr DeVany and others Tsatsouline, discourage failure as it sends the wrong message to the CNS) on the fifth rep, use 85% of your 1 rep max; you need to bring in those Type IIA and IIB muscles fibers, Type I's are slow twitch which is great for our Chronic Cardio friends. All depends on your body type too, for me as an ectomorph, what works for most won't give me the results I want

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                          • #14
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                            Sully do you have a link or site for Dr. DeVany? I just googled him and found a ton of them.

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                            • #15
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                              http://www.arthurdevany.com/ his new stuff you need to pay for, but if you dig around you can find his old blog posts and articles, plus there are a few youtube vids of him speaking

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