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  • PB, SS, CC, neither, all or what?

    1rst-post person here ... I'm a little confused. Firstly, I read about 20 pages worth of threads and it seems like (almost) no one who posts here is actually doing the PB program as outlined in Mark's pdf, which is fine, of course, but it makes it difficult for a beginner to figure out if, in fact, PB is the way to go or not. And then there's simplefit and convict conditioning, and all of a sudden I'm just left scratching my head.

    Anyway, perhaps I could get a little advice. I'm 56 yrs old, weigh 175 lbs, am flabby and skinny with a nicely developed paunch. I did the PB self-assessment test (mostly), with these results: plank, 1 min; squat, 43; pull up, 6 (could have done more but grip gave out); and pushup, 5 (!!!). So, I seem to be weak and imbalanced.

    That being the case, how do you think I might best progress -- i.e., with which program, PB, SS or CC, neither, some variation of all, or what?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    i can think of at least 5-6 people who do practice the PBF. check out the journals if you haven't yet.

    the best program for you is the one that keeps you motivated and sticking to the program, tbh. why not try a few weeks of each of them and see which one you like better? mark never said you HAVE to do PBF as a program to be primal. the rules are:

    1. lots of slow movement [ie walking]
    2. lifting heavy things
    3. the occasional full out sprint.

    how you choose to do these things is up to you.
    sigpic

    HANDS OFF MY BACON :: my primal journal

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    • #3
      i've been following simplefit for months, and i think it's a great program for beginners. it's easy to follow, and can be changed up pretty easily (i.e. switching which days you do which workout, adding exercises, etc.). mark's pbf program covers a little more area since it has the overhead press and plank...so i sort of combine the two. i agree with the advice to try them all out, and see what works best for you.
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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      • #4
        Thanks for replying! I have checked out some of the journals but I haven't had the luck to land on one that is all PBF from the get go. If you know of one in particular, especially one from a beginner like me, perhaps you could link to it.

        Meanwhile, I get the slow movement thing and the all-out sprint thing. It's setting up a doable success-likely program for Lifting Heavy Things that has me a little flummoxed. All things being equal, if you were going to start out with one, which one would you start out on? Or would it make just as much sense to toss a dart at the trio and begin with whichever one it hits?

        Thanks!

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        • #5
          I think the PB ebook is a great place to start. Once you build up a decent strength base, you can decide if you want to continue (adding a weight vest or increaseing leverage) or maybe start working with weights, sandbags, etc.

          They are all just means to an end... no one way of training is "better".

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          • #6
            experiment experiment experiment.

            I've been all over the place. I'm still tweaking, adding, subtracting. All plans are just guidelines, just because you're doing the PBF doesn't mean you can't do something outside of that, inversely, just because you're NOT doing the PBF doesn't mean you can't borrow from it.

            The PBF is a GREAT place not just to start but to get real strong, you will get out of it as much as you put in it. Goes for anything in life.
            I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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            • #7
              I do PBF because it is SIMPLE, requires minimal equipment (pull up bar only), and is all laid out in the e-book. And if you can do the basic moves as outlined, you're in a good place. If PBF doesn't cut it for you - too easy, too boring, not motivating enough - try one of the others suggested.

              I'm in a weird place right now due to a shoulder injury. I had been working on my upper body exclusively, since my legs are already pretty strong; now I can't do that so much so I've been seeing what I can do with my legs. Since I can squat for days I had to branch out & go looking for tougher stuff. Personally I like Al Kavadlo's blog; great attitude, breaks down the moves from super-basic all the way to superman. Working on the pistol squat now!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by flipper View Post
                Thanks for replying! I have checked out some of the journals but I haven't had the luck to land on one that is all PBF from the get go. If you know of one in particular, especially one from a beginner like me, perhaps you could link to it.

                Meanwhile, I get the slow movement thing and the all-out sprint thing. It's setting up a doable success-likely program for Lifting Heavy Things that has me a little flummoxed. All things being equal, if you were going to start out with one, which one would you start out on? Or would it make just as much sense to toss a dart at the trio and begin with whichever one it hits?

                Thanks!
                just the first one off the top of my head: ms. boner does PBF and shovelglove, i believe.

                i've been lifting heavy for over a year now, and i dont think i've done a program for more than 2 months at a stretch. switching it up can be beneficial, too - as long as you dont end up working out the same muscle groups over and over again. but i agree with arthurb, no matter the approach, we're all shooting for the same results. so, yeah, pull out that dart if you feel like it
                sigpic

                HANDS OFF MY BACON :: my primal journal

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                • #9
                  I think that lots of people on here are having success doing various programs, or their own interpretations of them. You didn't mention crossfit or a barbell program, so I'm assuming you are going the bodyweights direction. What I think the variety of succesful programs demonstrates is that there are multiple means to the same ends, and any program will be effective if you commit to it, if it motivates you, etc., That's the first priority.
                  Note: 6 proper pullups, but only 5 pushups? That is extremely unusual. I was doing maybe 25 pushups before I ever got my first proper pullup.
                  If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tfarny View Post
                    Note: 6 proper pullups, but only 5 pushups? That is extremely unusual. I was doing maybe 25 pushups before I ever got my first proper pullup.
                    agreed. that seems odd. my push-up to pull-up ratio has always been at least 4-5 : 1
                    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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                    • #11
                      I do PBF and love it! I've only been Primal for 3.5 weeks, but I've been a personal trainer for 11 years & I think it's a great, balanced workout for a lot of people.

                      Personally, I don't like variety in my workouts. I'm one of those people who used to go to the gym at 5:15 am and wake myself up on the stair-stepper, so I've been drawn to routines that are simple, progressive and easy to remember. I've never had a problem getting or staying fit with a fairly static routine.
                      Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
                      Pregnancy Nutrition Coaching
                      Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, all!

                        I don't get the 6 pull ups / 5 push ups thing either. And I probably could have done one or two more pull ups if my grip hadn't given way. Oh, oops -- I don't mean pull ups, I mean chin ups! But still, the imbalance is weird. It could be because I stand up paddle surf whenever there are waves -- iow, b/ 0 and 5 days a week -- and maybe that movement works out the chin up muscles but not the push up muscles. In any event, all my paddle buddies have put on tons of muscles of various sorts over the three years that we've been doing it -- and I'm the only one to show no gains. I think it's because a/ I drink more than them; b/ I eat somewhat worse than them; and c/ from the looks of things, my genetic potential is much much much worse than theirs. And I'm not being negative, just truthful.

                        So, that's why I'm here, to see if I can't better myself my strength by bodyweight since I haven't been able to do it by paddle surfing.

                        One final thing about push ups -- my right shoulder hates them. I could only do five yesterday and didn't give out because of shoulder pain but only because I couldn't do any more. But today that shoulder aches, and it's not a good ache. Is there a sub for push ups the way there is for chin ups?

                        P.S. Dragonfly: I'm with you. I don't want variety, I just want a good program with a good progression that I can do in a focused way but on autopilot too.

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                        • #13
                          I've been doing PBF and like it for the same reasons as have been enumerated: simple, quick, minimal equipment. I've got a similar imbalance between pull-ups and push-ups, for the self-assessment I managed 10 of the former and 16 of the latter. I hadn't worked out for a while before, but I used to go wall-climbing fairly often a few years ago and had to haul myself up plenty.

                          If you could only do five push-ups it sounds like you should be starting on one of the more basic movements, like the wall push-up. It'll also be easier on your joints (I'm guessing that's what hurts) since they're transferring less force. Over time they should strengthen at a similar rate as your muscular strength.

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