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The importance of moving slow.

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  • The importance of moving slow.

    I am a desk jockey, I work from home. Every day I get up, turn the PC on, cook breakfast, and begin work. Two hours later I workout (Heavy Lifting, Sledgehammer & Sprints/HIIT), I like to think this keeps me in nice shape, considering my lifestyle (and diet of course).

    But other than walking the dog, I do not get out much. I never do exercise 5x a week as I don't want to 'overtrain', I used to do Heavy Lifting 3x a week, ontop of HIIT 2x a week, what a bloomin' mad man!

    However, the PB has brought to my attention the importance of moving slowly. So in my fat burning efforts, how could gentle stationary bike cycling (say 30 mins every Tues/Thur/Sat) help my cause? On top of the metabolic effects from my other training, could adding in moving slow really help out, where do I draw the line between chronic cardio, and moving slow.

  • #2
    I'm struggling with the same thing - where does "a lot of moving slow" morph into "chronic cardio"? I read Mark's book back to back and he's really adament to stay between 55% and 75% of MHR for your "moving slowly" and to do that a minimum of 2 hours and would be good to have around 5 hours per week. I already had a Garmin 305 with a chest strap so I wear that during my 3 weekly runs and I walk when my HR>75%MRH. That's my solution.

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    • #3
      I don't think 30 min of stationary cycling can be considered chronic cardio. If you look at the recommendations for "moving slowly", Mark suggests 2-5hrs a week.

      Chronic(defnied as "long-lasting and recurrent ") cardio is more like an hour or more of cardio on a daily basis.

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      • #4
        Maybe I misunderstand, but I thought that if you're staying in a lower heart rate range (closer to 55%) that you basically can't overdo moving slowly.

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        • #5
          i use a stationary bike for my moving slowly. i park it in front of the tv or talk to my wife while using it. i'll usually go for 30-60 minutes a few times a week, depending on whether or not i'm feeling like (i've been bundling up and hitting the trails more lately). my heart rate stays low, my breath stays fairly even...the bike is basically a way for me to replace walking because it's too dark and cold to walk safely where i live
          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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          • #6
            Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
            Maybe I misunderstand, but I thought that if you're staying in a lower heart rate range (closer to 55%) that you basically can't overdo moving slowly.
            This!
            The Primal Holla! Eating fat. Getting lean. Being awesome.

            You were sick, but now you're well, and there's work to do. - Kilgore Trout

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            • #7
              When it comes to low-level activity like walking, more is better. Personally, I feel that Mark's recommendation of 3-5 hours a week is far too low. I can understand that this is a reasonable goal for beginners, but I personally believe that 7-10 hours a week minimum is a more reasonable target. At the lower end, that can average out to an hour a day. I feel that is too small itself, to be honest!

              I have to admit, nothing makes me more feel energised than a long walk with my headphones isolating me from the world. Bliss.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by KG View Post
                When it comes to low-level activity like walking, more is better. Personally, I feel that Mark's recommendation of 3-5 hours a week is far too low. I can understand that this is a reasonable goal for beginners, but I personally believe that 7-10 hours a week minimum is a more reasonable target. At the lower end, that can average out to an hour a day. I feel that is too small itself, to be honest!

                I have to admit, nothing makes me more feel energised than a long walk with my headphones isolating me from the world. Bliss.
                I have a very active job and getting in 40min 3x a day is sometimes just too much. I'd rather eat a couple hundred calories less than spend hours walking.
                If you have the time for it and enjoy it, by all means, do as much walking as you enjoy and can fit into your schedule.

                However, keep in mind that if you are dieting too much cardio CAN be a bad thing.

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                • #9
                  I have to agree with KG here - assuming you are already in decent shape, you really can't walk too much, as long as you are eating enough to support your body's energy needs. It isn't strictly necessary from a weight loss perspective, but humans were never intended to sit at a desk all day. NDF, if you have a very active job, it is entirely possible that you don't need any additional low-level aerobic activity. However, for those of us with sedentary jobs, the more time we can spend moving around, the better off we'll be!
                  The Primal Holla! Eating fat. Getting lean. Being awesome.

                  You were sick, but now you're well, and there's work to do. - Kilgore Trout

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                  • #10
                    Walking is good for your body not because it burns calories, it does, a bit, but because it builds bone, joint and muscle health in general and promotes beneficial hormone release. NOWHERE does mark talk about calorie burning as a reason for choosing one exercise over another. Recently I'm wondering if anyone posting on here has read the book or the archives in the website (?)

                    My favorite move-slow is a brisk walk home from work over the 59th st bridge at dusk - it's about 2.5 miles, with a bit of elevation, great views, and a sea breeze. Bose noise canceling headphones help too. It's fun and is a change from the subway. I don't like to think of it as "exercise time" but rather just a pleasant activity.
                    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tfarny View Post
                      Walking is good for your body not because it burns calories, it does, a bit, but because it builds bone, joint and muscle health in general and promotes beneficial hormone release. NOWHERE does mark talk about calorie burning as a reason for choosing one exercise over another. Recently I'm wondering if anyone posting on here has read the book or the archives in the website (?)

                      My favorite move-slow is a brisk walk home from work over the 59th st bridge at dusk - it's about 2.5 miles, with a bit of elevation, great views, and a sea breeze. Bose noise canceling headphones help too. It's fun and is a change from the subway. I don't like to think of it as "exercise time" but rather just a pleasant activity.
                      Hear, hear! I used to take the bus to get to sixth form (aka college in the UK), but frankly I find the walk there to be much more enjoyable. Listening to my music with my closed-back Sennheisers is just heavenly, even though 99% of the time I listen to some heavy D&B!

                      I do it purely because it makes me feel good, without thinking to myself "I managed to fit in some more exercise, today!". I don't really think anyone should see weight-loss as the primary result of exercise; all the other benefits gained, such as what tfarny listed, are the true advantages to look forward to.

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                      • #12
                        I look at everything I do as normal everyday physical activity, and not exercise. I walk at least 30 mins a day as minimum activity and that is done during my workday. Many days I include activities that are more intense such as lifting heavy things, or sprinting, or VO2 max conditioning. But moving slowly is my daily minimum activity.

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                        • #13
                          I think the key is not moving too quickly while you are moving slowly!! It wasn't until I bought a HRM that I had any idea just what it meant to "run slowly". I even think (although Mark would have to say for sure as I don't want to put words into his mouth) that Mark wouldn't have a problem with lots of running as moving slowly if the effort was low enough. The problem is that someone would need to be really fit to run for an hour on rolling terrain and never (and I mean never) let the HR increase past say 130-135. A lot of people might pass that with a brisk walk - especially on the hills!!

                          I have a hard time with lots of things along these lines. My wife's magazine (the one with Mariska Hargitay on the cover) has an article suggesting an exercise with a cable that requires both balance and strength and a shoulder bridge on a ball with a band. I would guess that most normal people (who aren't terribly fit - the ones most likely to attempt to follow this plan) can't do a standing straight leg deadlift while reaching with no weight and a correctly performed shoulder bridge on the floor with both feet down. If that is the case, those people have no business doing the advanced versions!!!

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