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What's the furthest you've hiked in VFFs?

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  • What's the furthest you've hiked in VFFs?

    After seeing it mentioned in another thread, I have a sudden whim to add the UK Coast to Coast walk to my bucket list. It's 190 miles, spread over 11-15 days. Won't be something I'll achieve in the next year or two, since I've no plans to head "home" any time soon. (And I'm not going to substitute the US Coast to Coast walk!

    What's the furthest you've hiked in VFFs? Did you build up to it? I've walked about 4 miles in mine, several times now, and I walk about 1.5 miles in them almost every day. They're pretty darned comfortable. But day after day long mileage--do they still feel good?

    ps. I found mention of this walk using a new entertainment...I stick random search terms into the Search box and visit random threads from long before I started this. I figure there's a lot of wisdom buried in this forum!
    Liz.

    Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
    Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

  • #2
    I have done about 4 miles myself. They are comfortable, but I have developed some blisters. It has been hot here in Texas this summer, so when the feet are sweatier, they tend to blister more.

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    • #3
      i'll routinely do a 3-5 mile walk in my vffs, but the longest was probably a hike that turned out to be about 12 miles up one of the northeast's biggest mountains. held up great.
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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      • #4
        Originally posted by john_e_turner_ii View Post
        I have done about 4 miles myself. They are comfortable, but I have developed some blisters. It has been hot here in Texas this summer, so when the feet are sweatier, they tend to blister more.
        I use them almost daily to work out in and have done several 10ks in them, the distance is really controlled more by what your feet are accustomed to. The heat/humidity will cause more sweating and can cause some blisters like John mentioned. I have had a few this summer here in VA with our excellent humidity. You might want to get a pair or two of injinji socks just in case your feet get worn down. I also suggest building up your hiking distances and frequency to feel out any potential endurance issues. Sounds like a fun challenge.

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        • #5
          I went on a hike with a bunch of Paleo folks, I didn't have VFFs but I think four people did. It was 8+ miles, plenty of rocks, easy -> moderate trail (Harriman State Park in the Hudson River Valley). Nobody had any complaints the whole time.
          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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          • #6
            I did some adirondak high peaks in my vibrams. 5-10 miles plus lots of elevation. After a few days of that I did some true barefoot.

            Walking on asphalt/concrete can make my feet alittle sore if Im not careful of foot placement.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              In July DH and I hiked up Wheeler Peak (highest peak in NM, USA) starting at about 9,500 ft and climbing to about 13,800. Both of us had 'broken in' our VFFs and are used to barefoot. The hike took about 9 hours and our VFFs were awesome. Only problems were due to very rocky ground, not blisters or anything.
              loose gravel = great (b/c it can absorb your weight and shift a little...spread it out)
              big rocks and boulders = great (you can really feel/wrap your foot around the rocks and have great balance)
              small rocks embedded in solid earth = painful over time (rock and ground can't give so foot has to)

              A lot of our hike involved the latter and our feet soles ended up sore and battered. Thankfully, we could walk right into snow banks and mountain streams which felt awesome and was a big benefit of the VFFs.

              HTH!

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              • #8
                I've gone on a couple 20 milers, and a 3 day 50 miler with no problems at all. By the time my feet were just beginning to feel sore, we were done hiking for the day and got plenty of rest. Those were all on fairly easy inclines/declines and mostly dirt/boulder trails though.

                On the steeper, rockier, higher elevation hikes I have no problem at all on the climb, but on the decline is where I run into problems. Going down steep declines cause alot more impact on your feet which can cause blisters if they aren't completely used to it. I like to run down the mountain because its just so fun, and one time that caused me to get some pretty nasty blisters on my heels (roughly silver dollar sized). After that I started using the socks for that kind of hike and have had no issues whatsoever.

                All in all, my feet get a bit more sore than when I wear shoes, but I have no body fatigue at all when I wear my vffs and my feet are good as new after a good nights rest. Pretty good tradeoff imo.

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                • #9
                  Whatever the distance up and down Diamondhead is.

                  But I wear them all day routinely...so probably accumulated more total mileage elsewhere.
                  iHerb.com 1st time buyer $5 discount code: GIS836

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                  • #10
                    I've done 18 miles in a day in my KSO's. They held up great but by the end my feet were pretty sore. I've been barefoot/ minimalist for around 16 months now, just as a reference. I'd say I could pretty easily hike 10-12 miles without any soreness and I can run around 6-9 miles barefoot without my feet getting too tender.

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                    • #11
                      The longest I have ever gone is about 4 miles of steep, rocky hiking. My feet hurt so bad near the end that I wanted to be carried and barley made it to he car. My feet were fine walking around the next day and I have never gotten a blister wearing them but I think the rocks and rough gravel was what made it unbearable. I really want to be able to backpack in them but if, after having them for almost a year now, I can only do 4 miles than that must mean either A) I am a wimp (I haven't built enough tolerance/strength) or B) the VFF's I have don't fit me right. I think the problem might be related to both A and B. After starting yoga, my feet feel wider.

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                      • #12
                        Once I've got my recent VFF-triggered heel pain resolved, I'm going to steadily build up to being able to walk 12 miles in them--about the pace of walking across England in 15 days. Should be able to do that nice and slowly since it's years till I'll do the actual coast to coast.

                        Does sound like on a multi-day hike, it would be worth having a spare pair of regular hiking boots just in case feet get sore. Luckily, there's a sherpa van service that drives baggage from one overnight accommodation to the next (no, I'll NEVER be primal enough to hike and then sleep in a tent )
                        Liz.

                        Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
                        Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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                        • #13
                          It's well worn route, and it goes through some fantastic places. But I would definently get upping the mileage for this hike. Even if you 'cheat' and sherpa van your pack you'll still need a day pack, plus you are getting up day after day. I would recommend the Flow Trek model, the north of England is a wet place, and these are the best I have found for hiking over here in the UK. Plus they have a slightly thicker insole, that combined with neoprene helping keep your feet warmer and the trek sole imo make them the best suited for our wilder places.

                          I've hiked in excess of 20 miles in mine, but it does take time to build up to be a barefoot hiker.
                          Give them nothing! But, take from them everything!

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                          • #14
                            Three miles in wet and dry weather - pavement and trail. No discomfort experienced. I can't wear them with the mountain bike though; raised-edge pedals are too bumpy and I don't want to risk my toes getting caught.
                            If you want to be somebody else, If you're tired of fighting battles with yourself
                            If you want to be somebody else, Change your mind...~Sister Hazel~

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