Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Exercise Induced Asthma

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Exercise Induced Asthma

    I 'think' I have exercise induced asthma, I have not been tested at a docs office, but here is what happens.

    I start to jog or run, and within 30 seconds to 5 mins I can start to feel my chest get heavy and congested. If I keep pushing through it, I get more congested, my throat feels narrowed down, I get nauseous, sometimes I get a copper taste in the back of my throat when it is really bad. The effects are different then burning lungs and stitches in the side.

    I consider myself 'active', but I have never really pursued cardio for any long period (namely because I get frustrated). I never have any breathing issues outside of when I try to jog/run.

    I have been really really trying to get in better fitness shape in the last 6 months. I warm up well, start walking or fast walking before jogging, I practice deep diaphragm breathing (I meditate and do yoga as well). The best luck I have had is slowing down to a walk as soon as it comes on, and then jogging in intervals. Sometimes it doesn't get worse, sometimes it gets worse and worse until I am just walking only. Usually it never passes, I just manage not making it worse in that session. Its frustrating.

    I am NOT a runner nor do I really want to be. At most I am trying to get up to running about 2-3 miles on some of the local trails, I love dashing down a wooded trail. On a good day I can run about 1.5 miles before I have to walk the rest of the way. I am not looking for chronic cardio, I just want to have a bit of endurance for some of my other interests.

    My exercise for the last few months has consisted of a fast paced hike 1-2x week and a short trail run attempt 1x week. I also do indoor climbing 1x week. About 3 weeks ago I took up crossfit 3x week. So most of my exercise is lifting heavy things and walking.

    Here is the thing I don't understand.......I can row at full effort, I can crank through a crossfit workout and have NO problems, normal burning lungs and heavy breathing, but no congestion/constriction. The ONLY time that happens is when I start jogging. This morning we did hill sprints in crossfit, only 40m into an 80m sprint I could already feel the constriction starting. I did 8 sprints total over the course of a 20 minute workout, and 2 hrs later I still feel congested and slightly tight in the chest if I take a deep breath.

    Any advice or techniques I can do to improve this?? I am willing to go to my doc, but since I am trying to avoid meds hoping to try out breathing/exercise tips first.

    Thanks!!
    Erin
    Daily Vlogs
    Primal Pets Blog

  • #2
    i jsut read an article in mens health (uk) that says cold liver oil (O3) can improve exercise induced asthma by 64% or something.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm exactly the same way! I can bike, hike, swim, lift weights, use the elliptical, etc with normal lung function, but I can't jog or run at all. My lungs seize up almost instantly. I used to use advair and albuterol, but I don't take anything anymore. I have celiac disease and it has gotten better since going gluten-free, but I'm still not a good runner at all. Basically, I just avoid running and I'm fine. Weird.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sounds to me like there may be something environmental that is setting you off since other exercise doesn't bother you. The best advice that any of us here could give you is to see a physician familiar with similar issues. Get tested for environmental allergies. There may be something out there that only bothers you mildly in normal times, but which gets worse when you suck more of it in while running.

        You might be able to increase fitness by using sprints which would minimize the time spent huffing and puffing. Or you might huff and puff worse and make the symptoms worse and croak. Hence my suggestion to see a physician rather than relying on us geeks.

        Comment


        • #5
          Go see a doctor. Full stop. Find an allergist or pulmonologist. If this is exercise induced asthma (which I have) albuterol will clear it up easily. No need to suffer.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hrmmm, since I wrote this I have been thinking about a few things. I think I might give up dairy for a trial. I have done it before and I do not eat a TON now, but I think it would be a good trial on several fronts. I am still considering the doc visit, which I may do as well. I have been gluten free for several years, but it does make me think about allergens more.

            Thanks everyone for your thoughts!
            Erin
            Daily Vlogs
            Primal Pets Blog

            Comment


            • #7
              I have exercise/allergen induced asthma, and to be honest the symptoms you're describing don't sound quite like asthma to me.

              The "tightness" in true asthma comes from deep in your chest and it feels like you can't fill your lungs; there's not really much effect on your throat. I've also not really heard of congestion increasing during an attack.

              Get it checked out, then you'll know for sure. The good news is that if you do have it, then its very, very treatable. I just did a triathlon with it (yes I know, chronic cardio, blah blah blah).

              Comment


              • #8
                I have suffered exercise induced asthma for decades ! Used the inhalers to recover. Just a brisk walk would bring on my asthma.

                TA DAH - I've finally found a simple solution after all of these years ! In my case asthma was caused by acidosis. An acidic urine as measured by inexpensive pH test strips. My urine tested at a VERY sickly 5.0 which is 100 times more acidic than normal.
                These 12 steps cured my Acidosis:
                Top 12 Ways to Make your Body More Alkaline | Icon Performance Online v3

                and I now have a normal pH of 7.2. I was not expecting this, but I can now do my 3 to 4 mile brisk walk without ANY asthma attacks for the 1st time in Decades!

                More here:
                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ml#post1284556
                It turns out that Acidosis is the breeding ground for a pandoras box of disease, and is so easily corrected.

                YAY!
                Grizz
                Last edited by Grizz; 08-17-2013, 01:27 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have been gluten free for several years, but it does make me think about allergens more.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Get your D3 level checked. I have completely eliminated my asthma, including exercise-induced by getting my D3 level up to 80 ng/ml, via supplementation.
                    Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
                    Pregnancy Nutrition Coaching
                    Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've read that vitamin C helps with exercise-induced asthma, but I don't know if it's true or if it really works.

                      Have you ever tried sprinting or running indoors on a treadmill? Just curious if you would experience the same thing. If you're able to run indoors without symptoms, then it could very well be environmental.

                      Edited to add: I was diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma once (I diagnosed myself, then went to the doc and got the doc to agree with me--that's how it usually goes down, heh). I start coughing when I do sprints (or any other form of high intensity cardio). If I run outside when it's cold (has to be pretty cold, like in the 40s), I start wheezing a little sometimes (it doesn't happen every time). The doc prescribed me albuterol, but it did absolutely nothing. So I still start coughing when I do high intensity stuff, but it doesn't bother me that much so I just ignore it.
                      Last edited by diene; 08-19-2013, 08:52 AM.

                      My journal

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Meadow View Post
                        I 'think' I have exercise induced asthma, I have not been tested at a docs office, but here is what happens.

                        I start to jog or run, and within 30 seconds to 5 mins I can start to feel my chest get heavy and congested. If I keep pushing through it, I get more congested, my throat feels narrowed down, I get nauseous, sometimes I get a copper taste in the back of my throat when it is really bad. The effects are different then burning lungs and stitches in the side.

                        I consider myself 'active', but I have never really pursued cardio for any long period (namely because I get frustrated). I never have any breathing issues outside of when I try to jog/run.

                        I have been really really trying to get in better fitness shape in the last 6 months. I warm up well, start walking or fast walking before jogging, I practice deep diaphragm breathing (I meditate and do yoga as well). The best luck I have had is slowing down to a walk as soon as it comes on, and then jogging in intervals. Sometimes it doesn't get worse, sometimes it gets worse and worse until I am just walking only. Usually it never passes, I just manage not making it worse in that session. Its frustrating.

                        I am NOT a runner nor do I really want to be. At most I am trying to get up to running about 2-3 miles on some of the local trails, I love dashing down a wooded trail. On a good day I can run about 1.5 miles before I have to walk the rest of the way. I am not looking for chronic cardio, I just want to have a bit of endurance for some of my other interests.

                        My exercise for the last few months has consisted of a fast paced hike 1-2x week and a short trail run attempt 1x week. I also do indoor climbing 1x week. About 3 weeks ago I took up crossfit 3x week. So most of my exercise is lifting heavy things and walking.

                        Here is the thing I don't understand.......I can row at full effort, I can crank through a crossfit workout and have NO problems, normal burning lungs and heavy breathing, but no congestion/constriction. The ONLY time that happens is when I start jogging. This morning we did hill sprints in crossfit, only 40m into an 80m sprint I could already feel the constriction starting. I did 8 sprints total over the course of a 20 minute workout, and 2 hrs later I still feel congested and slightly tight in the chest if I take a deep breath.

                        Any advice or techniques I can do to improve this?? I am willing to go to my doc, but since I am trying to avoid meds hoping to try out breathing/exercise tips first.

                        Thanks!!
                        Treated mine that I had for 24 years with:

                        Vitamin C Ester C 4,000 mg Daily - Lowers Inflammation in the lungs.

                        Magnesium Glycinate 800 Mg at Bedtime - Possible Cause of Developing Asthma is a Magnesium Deficiency, Relaxes Airways

                        Life Extension Optimized Quercetin - Inhibits Mast Cells like Allegra, too many mast cells in the lungs increase histamine causing a allergic reaction.

                        Local Honey - Build up Immunity to Local Pollen

                        Fish Oil Supplementation - Lowers Inflammation in the lungs.

                        Stay Hydrated By Drinking Pure Water

                        Do you have any digestion issues, poor digestion and low stomach acid has been linked to Asthma. Exercise induced asthma has been directly linked with lower stomach acid levels and lower amounts of hydration. Exercise causes the LES to relax which can cause GERD in the form of Asthmatic like symptoms. Acid doesn't even have to come into contact with the lungs, if it gets in your esophagus it can misfire a lot of nerves (heart palpation, constrict airways like breathing in cold air) that can cause symptoms.
                        My book Fix Your Gut is available on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Fix-Your-Gut-D...s=fix+your+gut. The book price is $7.99.

                        I also offer coaching: http://fixyourgut.com/fixyourgut-coaching/.

                        www.fixyourgut.com
                        Twitter: @fixyourgutjb

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have Asthma. Asthma is not congestion, but rather your airways constricting. Exercise causes it for some asthmatics, airborne allergens cause it for most asthmatics. Congestion is something else, though can also be caused by airborne allergens. That said, if you do have asthma, the congestion will certainly make it worse.
                          Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

                          Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
                          Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
                          Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
                          F/23/5'9"

                          26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had exercise induced asthma as a child. It sucked so bad. I'm talking nights spent with a nebulizer strapped to my mouth. My dad's cure? Baseball, soccer, football and basketball. He had asthma too and this is what his dad did for him. It was all closely supervised with medication and inhalers.

                            Now i'm active an rarely need my inhaler. For some people, exercise is the best way to get over it. See a doctor, get diagnosed, because if you do have asthma a puff on an inhaler can get you through a workout.

                            Ironically, the only thing now that sets my asthma off to the point where i need an inhaler is when i laugh really hard...ain't that a bitch.
                            Last edited by skotcharu; 08-19-2013, 04:52 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              i have exercise induced asthma. i have found that corn triggers it. i try to avoid all corn products. It is hard because most gluten-free packaged stuff contains some sort of corn. The upside is that i don't buy that stuff very often anyway. I also know that within 30 mins of eating a corn product (fresh, organic non-GMO corn on the cob seems OK) my lungs will tighten up. I also use an inhaler before i go running, but i've forgotten a few times and had no issues. (i could probably stop the inhaler...)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X