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  • #31
    1



    Born to Run by Christopher McDougall. Great read! I'm ready to just start running in my VFFs and never stop.

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    • #32
      1



      Awesome book, danid14. Though I must say as a recovering "cardioholic" marathoner it made me long to relapse. Sigh.


      You can find instructions (and materials if you care to pay) for constructing Tarahumara-style sandals (Huaraches) on Barefoot Ted's website


      http://barefootted.com/shop/

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      • #33
        1



        Trying to find:


        Diabetes, coronary thrombosis and the saccharine disease by Cleave


        Pure white and deadly - Yudkin


        without paying the silly prices being quoted by Amazon.

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        • #34
          1



          THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

          (The Evidence for Evolution)


          By Richard Dawkins

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          • #35
            1



            Geoff--maybe I'll make them AFTER winter up here in Boston :-)

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            • #36
              1



              Finished GCBC earlier this week, then just finished Michael Pollan's In Defense of Food late last night. Before that it was The Omnivore's Dilemma. I think I need to take a break from food books!


              Let's see...what to read next?? I have Russell Brand's memoir waiting to be read, and I've been meaning to reread The Mists of Avalon. But first, a trip to the library to see if there are any gems on the new book shelf.

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              • #37
                1



                1. An Incomplete education-3,684 things you should have learned but probably didn't


                2.Anne Morrow Lindbergh : her life


                Great idea!

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                • #38
                  1



                  "@OnTheBayou: Thom Hartmann, great writer. Have you read The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight?


                  I'm currently reading Dumbing Us Down by John Taylor Gatto and The Culture of Make Believe by Derrick Jensen. Just finished Affluenza by by John de Graaf, David Wann and Thomas Naylor."


                  Sounds like we have a similar political bent, piper. I've read three or four of Thom's books, although not Ancient Sunlight. He's one of my favorite thinkers. (And for all you conservatives, I also read things like Pat Buchanan from time to time. See how even handed I am?)


                  "Born to Run." No, we weren't. Overlooking the Primal aspects of running long distances, it is bad for our health. There is no way around that fact. We are not horses. I used to jog for health and I never found it fun, just useful. Maybe I never got that runner's high, but drugs would be more direct w/o the body damage.


                  Here's to Jim Fixx, dead at 42. (??)

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                  • #39
                    1



                    Also a Thom Hartmann fan here. He "gets it".

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                    • #40
                      1



                      I have bookmarks in the following right now:

                      Primal Blueprint, Ki in Daily Life, Ki: A Road That Anyone Can Walk, Ki:A Practical Guide For Westerners, Mindfulness in Plain English, The Genie in Your Genes, The Biology of Belief. I want to pick up, The Open Focus Brain.

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                      • #41
                        1



                        GCBC - although I admit to skipping the political bit at the beginning

                        Also a copy of the Origin of Species (Darwin) plus his diaries from the Beagle voyage. Writing of that era is very long winded though!

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                        • #42
                          1



                          Light reading, eh?

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                          • #43
                            1



                            OtB - I hear you on "Born to Run" (Why is it everyone always likes the Springsteen version more? HAH!) McDougall spends some time in his book addressing persistence hunting as evidence of humans' alleged evolutionary history as long distance runners, but I thought it was one of its weakest aspects - both scientifically and as literature.


                            From my perspective as a recovering marathoner and trail runner, though, I can tell you that McDougall's writing captured the essence of what makes endurance athletics so compelling to so many. This is not to say distance running is healthy or even benign. McDougall just did a great job getting to the core of it on an emotional level. If running's never brought you joy (something completely understandable), then the book probably won't resonate with you. Me? I found it to be chronic cardio's literary response to The Velvet Underground's "Heroin."


                            And since we're on the topic of "Heroin".... Looking back on my cardio days with the perspective of PB, I now sense that a traditional "runner's high" is something to be avoided. If your body's producing opiates that make you feel good, chances are those opiates are intended to mask the stress and associated discomfort to which you're subjecting yourself. Of course I'm talking about the "traditional" runner's high here, not the sense of calm, collected, peaceful, well being that comes from moving in the "move slowly" zone or the rush of accomplishment you feel after a good, hard (and short) sprint session.


                            O.K. last part, I promise (damn, I'm thread jacking myself). Jim Fixx's death gets brought out again and again by anti-running forces. Taken in the proper context I think there's an important lesson to be learned from his death (and others), but I think context is important to a complete understanding. So if you'll indulge me (and stop me if you've heard this one before)...


                            In assessing Fixx's untimely death at 52 it's important to note that he ate like a pig up until the day he died. CW and PB would recoil at some of the stuff he ate (though for entirely different reasons, of course). Before taking up running at 35 he was significantly overweight and smoked 2 packs a day. His father suffered his first heart attack at 35 and a second fatal one at 42. So, to me, Fixx's death is emblematic that running and jogging can't overcome decades of unhealthy living, nor can it necessarily change our genes' expression to overcome a so-called "family history" of heart disease.


                            People die every year in marathons, but substantially all of those deaths are later explained either by pre-existing (if latent) heart defects/disease (like Fixx and, more recently, Ryan Shay), other significant risk factors (like Fixx - bad diet, past smoker, overweight, etc.), or inadequate training.


                            None of this is to say chronic cardio is healthy. I can't defend as healthy an activity that involves an inescapable risk of death, and, as Mark has written, there are consequences of it to our health that, though short of death, can be debiliating. For instance studies show conclusively that cardiac muscles sustain damage akin to a heart attack in nearly all marathon finsihers (though the extent to which it is transient damage remains subject to further research).


                            Still, if risk of premature death is the standard by which we're going to judge fitness activities, then let's ask whether Stafton Johnson's recent injury should cause us to reconsider whether lifting heavy free weights is a good idea. Working out with weights with a trainer in a gym is statistically much safer than running, but Johnson was apparently healthy and well trained, and was working out in a busy weight room under the supervision of coaches and a spotter when his accident happened. It's a miracle he survived, and his pre-existing fitness and the presence of others is probably the main reason why. If something like that happened to me while working out alone at home I'd probably be dead.


                            Geesh, that was a long post. Sorry for my rambling. No offense intended, and, I hope, none taken.

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                            • #44
                              1



                              No, Geoff, not too long. One hundred percent on all accounts.


                              Unlike so many runners who think they are doing something really healthy, you understand the negatives. For anyone likewise, then fine, go run.


                              Good point about the opiates. I never thought of that, but like so many things, "Hidden in plain sight."


                              Jim's (unfortunate) death is just such an easy snark I can't resist.

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                              • #45
                                1



                                OTB - nothing feels like stretching your brain muscles!

                                However I've not got more than a few pages in since...um... April maybe??

                                GCBC is certainly worth the effort though - just wish my fellow nerds would be interested.

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