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Am I a fat burner??

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  • Am I a fat burner??

    I am a type 2 diabetic and recently started a continuous glucose monitoring system. I have been noticing that after I exercise my blood sugar spikes for about 1 1/2 hours after my workout. I understand that when the body is stressed as such during exercise your liver will produce glucagon. Does this inhibit your body from burning fat for fuel? I am currently eating around 50-75 grams of carbohydrates daily (in the form of mostly veggies but some berries as well). My weight loss has stalled although I am slowly losing body % fat. I would like your opinion as to if you think I am a fat burner or sugar burner? Thank you in advance for any information you would have on this subject. Thank you!!

  • #2
    Hi jewelbug and welcome. Mark doesn't always have time to answer all these posts being only human and stuff.

    But this MDA article by Mark can probably answer your questions.

    What Does it Mean to Be Fat-Adapted? | Mark's Daily Apple

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for the information. I would have to say that I am probably a fat burner for the most part. I am just concerned with the elevated glucose levels it would impact my bodies ability to burn fat. On a positive note I have lost a total of 62# and no longer taking any fast acting insulin. PB works!! I have another 20# to go and they are not coming off as fast as I would like them to so I am looking for anything to improve results. Thanks again for the response!!

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm diabetic too and this happens to me too. you might find this interesting

        Blood glucose can rise most commonly if your BG is too high when you start exercising or if you exercise very strenuously. Both of these rises are caused by the same reason, a deficit in necessary insulin to fund the activity.

        BG Too High:
        BG being too high always means that there is not enough insulin available to bring the BG down to where it should be. Whether T1 or T2, insufficient effective insulin can cause highs and exacerbate highs during exercise.
        When you exercise muscles need energy and the quickest form of energy is glucose. Muscles will increase their sensitivity temporarily during exercise so that the same amount of insulin can bring more glucose into muscle cells so that they can work. However, if there is insufficient insulin the muscles will not be able to receive enough glucose from the blood, even if there is more than enough glucose in the blood. As a result, the muscles send a signal that they need more energy, which the body responds to by releasing more glucose. However, since there is still not enough insulin, BG rises and the muscles continue to send the signal for more energy. This is why if your BG is high before exercising, exercise can drive your BG up rather than down, the reason is that there is not enough insulin.

        Exercise Strenuously:
        The same reasons as above are the reasons why very strenuous exercise causes an increase rather than a decrease in BG. During strenuous exercise the muscles send a signal for more energy, which the body responds to by releasing more glucose. Without sufficient insulin, very hard exercise and sometimes even novel exercise will cause a rise in BG.
        At rest, the body uses about 60% of its energy as fat and 40% as glucose. The harder you work, the less fat is used and the more glucose is used until you reach a state of anaerobic activity (weight lifting, fast sprinting) which uses 100% glucose. It is counterintuitive, but the harder you exercise the more insulin your body needs to deal with the increased amount of glucose being released for energy. Often by exercising at a less strenuous pace, can cause BG to decrease with exercise again.

        This isnt the case for non diabetics as they can release ample insulin

        Also the release of adrenaline and cortisol provoked by exercise can counteract the effects of insulin and cause your blood sugar to rise.

        yo'll find a lot of information on this on diabetic forums/websites as its not a rare problem and increased testing highlights it (particularly continuous) and its the opposite of what diabetics expect
        Last edited by CarbDodger; 05-23-2013, 01:18 PM.
        When I'd had enough of the grain and starched based 'diabetic eating for health' diet (eating for health, my ass!) my weight was 242.5 lbs. On starting primal- 18th April 2013 weight : 238.1.
        27th July 2013. weight after 100 days 136.9 weight lost 101.2lb ; that's 105.6lbs since I stopped the 'diabetic eating for health'
        new journal http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...ml#post1264082

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jewelbug28 View Post
          Thank you for the information. I would have to say that I am probably a fat burner for the most part. I am just concerned with the elevated glucose levels it would impact my bodies ability to burn fat. On a positive note I have lost a total of 62# and no longer taking any fast acting insulin. PB works!! I have another 20# to go and they are not coming off as fast as I would like them to so I am looking for anything to improve results. Thanks again for the response!!
          Awesome!
          Yes, it happens to a lot of people that the first pounds come off a lot easier than the last few. You will be fine. It's just a little slower. This is normal.

          ETA: Cross post! interesting info, Carbdodger. Jewelbug, Carbdodger knows her stuff about diabetes. Not my area of expertise.
          Last edited by Paleobird; 05-23-2013, 01:19 PM.

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          • #6
            Everybody have two main fuels that are used at the same time, but also depending on what you are doing; fat and glucose. Glucose is used mostly around the meals and when doing high intensity work. Fat is used primary between meals and when doing low intensity work. Most of the time your body uses BOTH type of fuels, so don't listen to false rumours..
            "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

            - Schopenhauer

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
              Everybody have two main fuels that are used at the same time, but also depending on what you are doing; fat and glucose. Glucose is used mostly around the meals and when doing high intensity work. Fat is used primary between meals and when doing low intensity work. Most of the time your body uses BOTH type of fuels, so don't listen to false rumours..
              Gorbag, if you bothered to read the article I linked by Mark, you would know that this is exactly what he is talking about. Being fat adapted means being metabolically flexible enough to move back and forth between glucose and ketones.

              Not everyone is able to do this however as they have been eating extremely high carb for so long that their systems have "forgotten" how to be flexible. They need to be re-trained and this adjustment often causes the carb flu. The fact that people get carb flu is proof that such lack of flexibility does exist.

              Personally I never had trouble adapting to a flexible metabolism and you may not have either. That doesn't mean that it is only a "rumor".

              Jewelbug, welcome to the wonderful, and sometimes contentious, MDA boards. We gripe at each other sometimes but it is all in good fun. BTW, Gorbag also thinks that Diet Coke is healthy. Consider the source.

              Comment


              • #8
                There's another concept of "fat-burning" out there which is basically a marketing scam by diet gurus, exercise gurus, and manufacturers of would-be "healthy" snack foods to separate desperate dieters from their money.

                "Eat this food product or supplement and burn fat."
                "Do that ab exercise and burn fat."
                "Eat before and after your exercise and burn fat."
                "Stay on the elliptical or treadmill for hours every day and burn fat."

                etc.

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                • #9
                  Thank you soo much!!!!! You explained it so well!! I have been pushing myself a lot harder during my workouts so I would say that it was definately strenuous. My FBS have been running 80-90's and I do not eat prior to working out. I would love to hear your story and even find out what your macronutrient daily % are. All of your information is like a new book......tell me more!! I didn't realize that there is a diabetic forum so I will be checking that out as well!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                    Gorbag, if you bothered to read the article I linked by Mark, you would know that this is exactly what he is talking about. Being fat adapted means being metabolically flexible enough to move back and forth between glucose and ketones.
                    This is completely wrong, the body use as a default free fatty acids and glucose, and when it runs out of glucose it also start to produce ketone bodies as a reserve fuel for the brain. Everybody are already perfectly fat adapted, what you can be adapted to is to handle the stress of less diatary glucose



                    Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                    Not everyone is able to do this however as they have been eating extremely high carb for so long that their systems have "forgotten" how to be flexible. They need to be re-trained and this adjustment often causes the carb flu. The fact that people get carb flu is proof that such lack of flexibility does exist.
                    Again, this is completely wrong, even the most insuline resistant metabolism does not "forget" to burn fat, and the myth of a "carb flu" is completly nonsense. What you can be adapted to, is psycologically and to a lesser degree physiologically; to handle the stress of less dietary glucose...
                    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                    - Schopenhauer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                      This is completely wrong, the body use as a default free fatty acids and glucose, and when it runs out of glucose it also start to produce ketone bodies as a reserve fuel for the brain. Everybody are already perfectly fat adapted, what you can be adapted to is to handle the stress of less diatary glucose
                      [Everybody is naturally fat adapted if they haven't damaged their metabolism by one means or another (obesity, diabetes, thyroid problems, excessive sugar consumption, insulin resistance, leptin resistance, etc.)

                      Go crack open a Diet Coke and read Mark's article again. You will find that it and your position are not disagreeing.]


                      Again, this is completely wrong, even the most insuline resistant metabolism does not "forget" to burn fat, and the myth of a "carb flu" is completly nonsense. What you can be adapted to, is psycologically and to a lesser degree physiologically; to handle the stress of less dietary glucose...
                      [I didn't experience carb flu. Does that mean it doesn't exist? I have never seen a walrus either. Does that make them mythical creatures?]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                        [Everybody is naturally fat adapted if they haven't damaged their metabolism by one means or another (obesity, diabetes, thyroid problems, excessive sugar consumption, insulin resistance, leptin resistance, etc.)


                        Certain people like to talk about the human metabolism like it is some kind of a machine that can be "damaged" or "broken" and need to be fixed which is inaccurate or plain wrong IMO. What do you think an obese insulin resitant person burn for energy then, since max 500 gram of stored glycogen will not take a long time to burn through? The fact is that they burn fat like everybody else for most of the time, execept right after the meal when the body gives priority to carbs, but even then it does not shut down fat burning completely. If ingesting alchohol the body gives priority to burn off alchohol and put carbs and fat on the waiting list.

                        Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                        [I didn't experience carb flu. Does that mean it doesn't exist? I have never seen a walrus either. Does that make them mythical creatures?]
                        "Carb flu" is nothing else than the feeling of stress from not getting enough carbs for their needs. Its a bit like when your spouse leaves you, first you may feel miserable for a while, then you adapt to living without him/her. But "carb flu" has nothing to do with becoming a more "efficient" fat-burner, that's nonsense...
                        "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                        - Schopenhauer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                          Certain people like to talk about the human metabolism like it is some kind of a machine that can be "damaged" or "broken" and need to be fixed which is inaccurate or plain wrong IMO. What do you think an obese insulin resitant person burn for energy then, since max 500 gram of stored glycogen will not take a long time to burn through? The fact is that they burn fat like everybody else for most of the time, execept right after the meal when the body gives priority to carbs, but even then it does not shut down fat burning completely. If ingesting alchohol the body gives priority to burn off alchohol and put carbs and fat on the waiting list.
                          This is why insulin resistant people need to eat every two to three hours or else get the hypoglycemic shakes. The fat is right there but their body doesn't know how to utilize it efficiently. Oxide once referred to it as like having a can of gasoline in the trunk of the car but it won't make the car go unless it gets into the tank. The car doesn't know the gas can is there when the signaling mechanisms of your metabolism are not functioning properly.

                          "Carb flu" is nothing else than the feeling of stress from not getting enough carbs for their needs. Its a bit like when your spouse leaves you, first you may feel miserable for a while, then you adapt to living without him/her. But "carb flu" has nothing to do with becoming a more "efficient" fat-burner, that's nonsense...
                          You're entitled to your opinion. That doesn't make it factual. Do some research. It's real.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                            This is why insulin resistant people need to eat every two to three hours or else get the hypoglycemic shakes. The fat is right there but their body doesn't know how to utilize it efficiently. Oxide once referred to it as like having a can of gasoline in the trunk of the car but it won't make the car go unless it gets into the tank. The car doesn't know the gas can is there when the signaling mechanisms of your metabolism are not functioning properly.
                            Hypoglycemica, shakes due to fall in bloodsugar for diabetic's does not mean that they are shut off from fat burning since they will still burn fatty acids from the blood along with glucose. Nobody complains when sleeping, when the human metabolism run steady state on fat...
                            "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                            - Schopenhauer

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                              Hypoglycemica, shakes due to fall in bloodsugar for diabetic's does not mean that they are shut off from fat burning since they will still burn fatty acids from the blood along with glucose. Nobody complains when sleeping, when the human metabolism run steady state on fat...
                              Hypoglycemia happens in non diabetic people too. Sure they do burn some fat, they just don't burn it efficiently or effectively.

                              Just because you have an undamaged healthy metabolism does not give you reason to generalize your experience to everyone.
                              Personal experience+personal opinion=/=facts about other peoples lives and bodies.

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