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Calories - do they really count?

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  • Calories - do they really count?



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-rnO8OqrRU&feature=related


    This guys says a lot of things that go along with what Mark says, and like other people, he says stuff that doesn't agree with what Mark says. The one thing I am interested in is what he says about calories. He says that they don't matter because the way we figure out calories is by burning them which is way more simple than how our body processes food. If you want to watch the whole thing, it's about an hour long. What do you guys think? And Mark, I would love to hear what you have to say too.


  • #2
    1



    I second this question.

    Comment


    • #3
      1



      He does say calories don't matter in the context of calories being a misused term for measuring energy from food. He then goes on to say "eat appropriate levels of fats and protien".


      This is not the same as saying eat low carb and calories won't matter so eat all the fat and protein you want.

      Don't be a paleotard...

      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

      http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

      Comment


      • #4
        1



        Sorry chima, calories count every single time. Read Lyle McDonald.

        Comment


        • #5
          1



          I have read 90% of Lyle's stuff.


          I never said anything about calories not counting.


          I was replying to the question on the article.


          If you actually read and understood Lyle then you would realize it is all about context.

          Don't be a paleotard...

          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

          Comment


          • #6
            1



            Perhaps my response should have read:


            This is not the same as saying "eat low carb and calories won't matter so eat all the fat and protein you want".


            Get it?

            Don't be a paleotard...

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

            http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

            Comment


            • #7
              1



              What I want to know is why exactly calories count if the way that they're measured is way different than how our body actually processes them.


              I've always gone on the idea that one should eat when hungry and not eat when not hungry. It's all about listening to your body IMO.

              Comment


              • #8
                1



                In my opinion a lot of people who need a lifestyle change such as the PB have forgotten what the difference between "not hungry" and "full" is and also eat out of habit rather than hunger.


                When he says "eat appropriate levels of fats and protein" this to me is the same as saying calories matter.


                Some people can get away with not counting calories and intuitively making the right choices. Other people have problems with overeating even on a low carb diet.

                Don't be a paleotard...

                http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

                http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

                http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

                http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  1



                  a strange question indeed: suppose what would happen if they didn't...

                  even if you eat a strict 100 percent paleo diet but stuff yourself up (for whatever reason) you're gonna get fat - i know it on my personal experience

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    1



                    Eating a low-carb diet tends to decrease peoples appetite substantially so they automatically consume fewer calories.


                    I believe low-carb dieting has big metabolic/hormonal advantages, but at the end of the day calories do count.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      1



                      I think krisssi is right that low-carb tends to decrease appetite...but in my experience, that switch took nearly 6 months. I think part of it was learning to trust my body not to go into screaming-hunger mode if I didn't eat as much/often as I used to before discovering the PB.

                      Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

                      Latest post: Stop Being Stupid

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1

                        [quote]

                        The amount of food energy in a particular food could be measured by completely burning the dried food in a bomb calorimeter, a method known as direct calorimetry. However, the values given on food labels are not determined this way, because it overestimates the amount of energy that the human digestive system can extract, by also burning dietary fiber. Moreover, not all food energy eaten is actually resorbed by the body (fecal and urinal losses). Instead, standardized chemical tests or an analysis of the recipe using reference tables for common ingredients are used to estimate the product's digestible constituents (protein, carbohydrate, fat, etc.). These results are then converted into an equivalent energy value based on a standardized table of energy densities.
                        </blockquote>


                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_energy


                        It&#39;s all a bit furry and a lot of guesswork, as no two people process the same food the same way. You can use the calories as a rough guide, but I wouldn&#39;t rely on calculating anything very accurately.


                        At the end of the day you need to find out what works for you. You can&#39;t get an accurate BMR number from any chart.


                        To lose weight you need to either consume less calories or change the way you handle calories (raise your BMR).


                        Some people are happy to punish themselves and cut calories (and possibly add in a lot of cardio). Most people just can&#39;t sustain it (esp. as they get older). You also lose muscle this way as your body is effectively in starvation mode.


                        Others have great results raising fat intake and lowering carbs to change BMR. You can also IF or lift weights to enhance this (and build muscle). You then rely on satiety to control calorie intake. Again this requires willpower to cut carbs very low and lots of people can&#39;t manage it.

                        The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                        Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                        Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                        Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          1



                          Tell me, Tarlach, how does our BMR change as we raise fat and cut carb intake?


                          And where can I read a reliable source that says there can be a substantial difference in the caloric value of food between different people?


                          I&#39;d be very interested to read about this.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            1

                            [quote]

                            Reduction in carbohydrate intake rather than total calorie deprivation appears to be the determinant factor. These alterations in thyroid function are believed to reduce the catabolic activity of the organism and thus to conserve energy in the face of decreased calorie intake.
                            </blockquote>


                            http://www.thyroidmanager.org/Chapter5/5a-frame.htm


                            What you eat, how much and when all affects hormone levels.

                            The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                            Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                            Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                            Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1



                              krissi, have you read Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes? I can&#39;t imagine a better resource. Right now I&#39;m just finishing chapter 17, which discusses the differences in BMR between lean and obese people. The book is packed with information about carbs, fats, protein, the studies that have led to CW, the controversies... it is a fascinating, though dense read. I highly recommend it.

                              Comment

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