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  • Polyphasic Sleep



    I have heard of polyphasic sleep before, but I never really paid any attention to it. Recently one of my friends started following this sleep pattern.


    I don't really care all that much, because I love myself some good long sleep (and the occasional lucid dreaming that Mark mentioned in a past weekend links is always welcomed)


    but he started a blog and is telling all my other friends and acquaintances how amazing and beneficial it is for you, but it seems off to me.


    I certainly won't ever sleep like this, but it is like talking nutrition with someone, there are plenty of resources on the internet to support his stance as there are mine.


    Any thoughts?


  • #2
    1



    BigBeck,


    I Googled this and found this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphasic_sleep


    Fascinating. I know a lot of cops and Security professionals (myself included) end up sleeping this way from time to time. Don't really think it's an ideal to strive for... but it works.

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    • #3
      1



      OMG, I must be really tired. First time I read the title of the thread, I read it as "polyplastic sheep"


      o.O


      My mom sleeps like this. I just don't get it. She'll sleep for 4 hours, get up and tinker around the house, take a nap for a couple hours, go to work, come home and tinker, then nap, wake up... you get the idea. I couldn't do that.

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      • #4
        1



        I've thought this through a lot and (my personal opinion here) I think the natural reason for this sort of sleep is due to the biological need to take care of infants. A newborn is supposed to sleep no more than four hours at most and generally they only go for two. The one friend I had who was already on a polyphasic schedule BEFORE having a kid adapted to the nighttime regimen his newborn required with no problem whatsoever. Those "hellish first three months" everyone else goes through he claimed flew right by and he had no loss of productivity or sour spells. His wife loved him for it because she'd pump during the day and he'd end up feeding their son at night. She got an entire night of rest every other night, he got to nap whenever he needed to, and they didn't have any issues bonding as a family due to lack of sleep.

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        • #5
          1



          Sounds like hell on a stick to me, BUT, my OH is self-employed and deals with people all over the world. That kind of sleeping behaviour is natural to her. And she seems to survive quite well on it. Never knew it had a name, though!

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          • #6
            1



            when i was working shifts i some days just had to do it, but not by choice.

            i enjoy long dreams and yes, lucid dreming is a fave hobby so not for me

            challenge yourself
            i blog here http://theprimalwoman.blogspot.com/

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            • #7
              1



              Mens health did a great article on this with one of their writers; he intermittent fasting and sleeping; said he functioned great. He stopped though with the reasoning that he had too much time. He would finish his work and end up watching T.V. for hours.


              It's rumored that Einstein and some other great (non school educated) people of our time did this.


              Im pretty sure I already do this on the weekends accidently and I don't know if it's the best idea haha...

              sigpic
              In Pursuit of Healthiness, Only to Achieve Happiness!: www.livingnotsurviving.com

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              • #8
                1



                From what I've read even the 20 minute naps allow for lucid dreaming.

                It's not a question of how long you are in bed.

                Once you learn that you create your own reality and that you are fully responsible for your life, you can begin to see the world as it is and then you realize the limitless possibilities.

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                • #9
                  1



                  I've slept this way from time to time (weeks during exam time). It certainly is an appealling concept- sleep less, live more. But other sites note that although a person who is 'behind on sleep' does enter REM faster, sleeping this way puts people in a constant state of sleep deprivation, and they're less able to fully use their mental capabilities for creativity, etc.


                  Yet, it seems to work for some people, and itll have to work for me come final exams. I've read that we're made to sleep in a biphasic manner-one long 'night sleep' and a nap in the afternoon when hormones levels change and energy levels drop.

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