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IF for Hypoglycemia?

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  • IF for Hypoglycemia?



    Is IF safe for non-diabetic hypoglycemia? I'm talking about hypoglycemics who have low blood sugar as a result of insulin resistance/hyperinsulinism, not hypoglycemia as a result of being a diabetic who injected too much insulin. It would seem logical to me that IF would help the IR in the long-term, but may be harmful in practice.


  • #2
    1



    This is kind of tough to answer, mostly because I don't want to get sued ... It really depends on the degree of hypoglycemia and whether it is because of an underlying disease (does not have to be diabetes related) or just because thats the way you are. The best way to make this judgment, besides a doctors advice, is trial or observation.


    Really, everyone "fasts" for some part of the day: sleep. During the 8 hours of sleep (your doing that right? haha) you don't eat anything and probably drink very little. So how do you feel in the mornings after you wake up? If you get the symptoms right away-sweating, dizziness, headache-then I might do a protein-sparing-fast instead. If you feel fine after that, then maybe try it out, preferably on a day when your not going to be doing anything potentially dangerous (driving), at-least until you get an idea of how you react.


    Hope that helps.

    sigpic
    In Pursuit of Healthiness, Only to Achieve Happiness!: www.livingnotsurviving.com

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    • #3
      1



      Madame P,


      I'd tread carefully ... I have non-diabetic hypo, and I seem to have a limit of about 16 hours (including sleep.)


      Now, I'm new to PBlueprint, but even trying zero carbs has sent me into fainting ...


      I've heard others here have had success fasting that have hypo, but it seems to depend on how long you've been on low carb - - if you've been on it a long time your fasting serum insulin levels *should* be lower.

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      • #4
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        • #5
          1



          Thank you both for your input. Don't worry, I won't sue anyone! Not even my doctor, who firmly believes that I should be eating every 3 hours, which would only fuel the underlying issue (Insulin Resistance).


          I have actually completed a number of 16-hour fasts with no hypoglycemic spells and no discomfort. I have been fasting for 3 months, about 3 times a week. There is a marked improvement in my IR. I feel pretty good, however, I have been getting dizzy spells when getting out bed in the morning or shortly after a workout -- nothing major, but worrisome all the same. And I can find nothing written about hypoglycemia and fasting. Everything is about lowering blood sugar.

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          • #6
            1



            Madame - I'm certainly no expert by all means, but I do have WAY too much experience I never wanted in hypoglycemia.


            Anyway - the thing I can see is probably your serum insulin levels are lowering. I think the only true danger is for someone who has high insulin due to other factors, like glycogen storage diseases, insulin secreting tumors, etc.


            Yes, the doc's told me "Eat every 3 hours, have a piece of candy, pasta ..." that led me to almost 600 lbs ... doesn't work does it?


            I am JEALOUS you've had no hypo symptoms! It's a GREAT sign ... do you have a meter to test your glucose levels when you have the "spells."


            Sometimes the low levels are hard to "catch" on the meters, due to the fact that by the time your shaking hand has got a drop of blood onto the meter, the adrenaline has done its job already.


            I'd say you're doing awesome - look into measuring the glucose BEFORE you get out of bed in the morning with a meter? GRIFF said the glucose sticks are on Amazon - - see if your fasting levels are low?


            Other things it could be ... maybe your blood pressure has moved to healthier levels now on PB? Getting out of bed would cause orthostatic hypotension, as your body adjusts from resting state!


            After a workout, that COULD be hypo, or a myriad of other things too ... are you getting enough fluids/potassium, etc ...


            All in all I'm struggling to just GET to where you are now ... all I know is I'm amazed that a low glycemic HIGH Fat meal can last me as much as 6 hours, the B.S. the doc's fed us on eating every 3 hours is absurd. It was killing me.


            Also, watch the CAFFEINE and Ibuprofen - I had that one my first day trying <20 carbs and paid for it by fainting ... both lower glucose (caffeine first raises it, then crashes it)


            Things I take to avoid the hypo are


            Cystine, B-1, C, niacin (USP regular niacin that gives the burn), and Time release pantothentic acid.


            Good luck, I know the suffering of hypo ALL TOO WELL!


            If Hypo was my wife, I&#39;d file for divorce!

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            • #7
              1



              My cousin is one of my &#39;PB converts&#39; and just texted me that after eating this way for 3 weeks, she just got really sick (she&#39;s hypo) and asked if I thought she should take some Grade B Organic Maple Syrup with her proteins. Mr. Meso, I passed along some of the info you shared here, thank you.


              Anything else to pass on to her?

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              • #8
                1



                Hi Sassa -


                When you say she got "sick" - what exactly were her symptoms? Is she reactive hypoglycemic, or does she have another disorder that causes chronic insulin secretion?


                I&#39;m *relatively* confident my hypo is reactive, but never had the complete test to ensure there is no insulin secreting tumors, or glycogen storage diseases ...


                I would NOT use the maple syrup, unless for a total hypo emergency (I&#39;ve been to the point where my sugar was so low, I&#39;ve chugged Maple Syrup)


                Mrs. Butterworth&#39;s Brought Me Back a couple times. LOL -





                If she does have carbs, I&#39;d eat them LAST in the meal, and have the meal be high fat, high fiber!


                If you can tell me more what her "sick" symptoms were, maybe I can throw some other tips to her to help?


                A word of caution - Type II Diabetics CANNOT take the large amounts of B1/Cystine/C like that, as it will reduce their insulin, hence raise their sugars!


                I&#39;m using the mixture to try and "cheat" into ketosis, but reducing by lowering my serum insulin faster... *HOPEFULLY*


                Here&#39;s the details if it helps!


                ---------------------------------------

                Preventing Hypoglycemia


                Anti-Aging News, January 1982 Vo.2, No. 1 pg 6-7


                Cysteine is a strong reducing agent (it can prevent oxidation of some other substances). In fact, it has been found that too much cysteine in a cell culture medium can inactivate the hormone insulin contained in the medium. The insulin molecule contains three disulfide bonds, at least one of which can be reduced by cysteine. When this happens, the insulin molecule can no longer maintain the proper shape to function normally in stimulating the metabolism of sugar.


                In hypoglycemia attacks, there is too much insulin and too little sugar in the blood stream. Cysteine can inactivate insulin, thereby allowing the sugar level to begin to rise again. We and others have used the combination of vitamins B1, C, and cysteine to successfully abort severe attacks of hypoglycemia. A reasonable dose for a healthy adult is 5 grams of C, 1 gram of B1, and 1 gram cysteine. Although cysteine is a nutrient, it s use on a long-term basis should be considered experimental. Start with a low dose (250 milligrams per day) and work your way up. Always use at least three times as much vitamin C as cysteine. Be sure to consult with your physician and have regular clinical tests of basic body functions, especially liver and kidney. Diabetics should not use cysteine supplements due to its anti-insulin effects.


                :-)

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                • #9
                  1



                  She said she&#39;s not diabetic, but the opposite.


                  I emailed her your response.


                  I sure hope to help her. She&#39;s had a myriad of issues and not only can&#39;t seem to lose weight, but she&#39;s put more weight on than I was ready to handle seeing on her when she showed up to the family reunion! Poor thing. Especially since we were similar weights at one time and I had dropped a bunch, whereas she increased significantly :-(


                  I, over a year ago, complained to her about my weight-loss woes and she was nice enough to give me a pair of her old size 16 jeans because I didn&#39;t fit any of my smaller jeans at the time.


                  Now, I&#39;m climbing out of a size 8, due to the Primal Blueprint and she&#39;s somewhere in the size 24+ range. I was ecstatic that she actually tried the PB way (I guess her seeing my results spurred it on) and she told me that she did lose weight, so I&#39;m glad she&#39;s not deterred, but this &#39;hypoglycemic&#39; thing sounds like an unwelcomed bump in the road.


                  Anyway, I&#39;ll report back when I hear from her again.


                  Thank you!

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                  • #10
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                    Yea, let me know :-)

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                    • #11
                      1



                      She said her fasting levels have been between 60 - 80, at the highest, with the exception of 101 after eating ice-cream the night before.


                      As far as feeling sick, she was &#39;lethargic, heavy legs and extremely tired, sometimes shaky. When she ate some carbs, her symptoms went away within 10 minutes.

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Mesolithic... My hypoglycemia was never severe enough that I started testing at home. I never had full-blown attacks. I had tiredness, dizziness, some fainting, irritability, and insane carb craving (although that could have been the IR). I was diagnosed in the doctor&#39;s office -- my level was 55.


                        I&#39;ve been strictly eating according to the Paleo diet for awhile now and it&#39;s really, really made a difference. I would love to fully embrace the lifestyle and do more fasting, but the dizziness... worrisome.


                        My blood pressure did go from 90/60 to 110/70 in 3 months, so you&#39;re right, maybe I&#39;m adjusting.


                        Wish I shut up the little doctor in my head telling me "Every 3 hours... every 3 hours..."


                        Good luck to you too ;-)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mr Mesolithic View Post
                          Preventing Hypoglycemia


                          Anti-Aging News, January 1982 Vo.2, No. 1 pg 6-7


                          Cysteine is a strong reducing agent (it can prevent oxidation of some other substances). In fact, it has been found that too much cysteine in a cell culture medium can inactivate the hormone insulin contained in the medium. The insulin molecule contains three disulfide bonds, at least one of which can be reduced by cysteine. When this happens, the insulin molecule can no longer maintain the proper shape to function normally in stimulating the metabolism of sugar.


                          In hypoglycemia attacks, there is too much insulin and too little sugar in the blood stream. Cysteine can inactivate insulin, thereby allowing the sugar level to begin to rise again. We and others have used the combination of vitamins B1, C, and cysteine to successfully abort severe attacks of hypoglycemia. A reasonable dose for a healthy adult is 5 grams of C, 1 gram of B1, and 1 gram cysteine. Although cysteine is a nutrient, it s use on a long-term basis should be considered experimental. Start with a low dose (250 milligrams per day) and work your way up. Always use at least three times as much vitamin C as cysteine. Be sure to consult with your physician and have regular clinical tests of basic body functions, especially liver and kidney. Diabetics should not use cysteine supplements due to its anti-insulin effects.


                          :-)
                          Thank you very much for this - just done a bit more searching and this study shows that (N-acely-)cycteine improves insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (which I have, and I expect Sassa's cousin also has). The subjects took 1.8g or 3g per day if they were very obese. Why on earth have we not heard of this before?!?! My guess is that pharmaceutical companies can't make money from cysteine like they can metformin, so Doctor's aren't encouraged to prescribe it and probably don't even know abou it. It sickens me to think that it could help people but it's hidden in aid of pharmas profits.

                          Elsevier

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                          • #14
                            OMG... I am joining this thread... I'm a severe reactive hypo.... this is the one thing that is driving me nuts with PB. I've been rather primal since Feb. Love eating this way and will continue to do so.... but my hypo is driving me insane as far as what it does to my energy levels. I force myself to push through it but I'd love to learn from other hypos on how you manage it to see if I'm missing some tricks.

                            So far I've learned that I must keep the carbs at about 70-75. If I get low BS symtoms I can use cheese or sunflower seeds to fix it. Can't use boiled eggs. I think I can use avacado but I'll have to test with it again.

                            I can use IF if I choose to from say.... 10pm the night before until 2-3pm the next day but I have to be CAREFUL on what meal I eat when I do... BAS works if I put some feta in with whatever meat.

                            Plus....I know it makes it NOT an IF session but if I eat say 1 serving of sunflower seeds in the morning I can just eat that until dinner and not have the reaction post dinner at all.

                            I should note: not hungry at all, only warning is the fuzzy feeling and runny nose that comes before the ears sort of buzz and the shakes etc start...then the exhaustion... god awful bone melting exhaustion.

                            But I'd love to hear what others are doing or suggest....

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                            • #15
                              Hi Nuance,

                              The hypo is driving me mad too, I've had it virtually all my life and being primal for 3 months hasn't helped. I like eating this way but sometimes the brain fog, irritability and anxiety can get too much. It helped to eat 4 new potatoes yesterday, together with some fatty lamb. I tried eating some butternut squash today (all very small amounts) but it just made me feel worse. Half an hour after eating *just* chicken wings I felt better, so I'm wondering if the extra carbs are a good idea or not. Hypos are caused by an excess of insulin, so it is that which we have to address. Having just done some more research (reading scientific journals) I'm considering taking metformin along with the cysteine in order to improve my insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin levels. Do you have PCOS?

                              I used to find that cheese really helped me too, but I've cut out dairy since going primal in an attempt to lose weight.

                              I've tried going longer without food but I feel so terrible that it can't be right. I think its best to get the hormones and hypoglycemia under control before trying to IF.

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