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are peas and green beans okay?

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  • #46
    1



    So, Alan, have a source for mastodon meat??????


    We've been all over the potato issue just last week. Since no human ate them before maybe 10K years ago, technically not paleo. But humans were surely eating tubers of one kind or another pre-Bering Straits Bridge days.

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    • #47
      1



      Here in the UK we have wild versions of numerous food crops, and interestingly many of them are maritime species - sea kale, sea beet etc. We also have wild carrots and parsnips and I don't recommend you eat them, the roots are horrendously fibrous, as are the leaves of the former. Kinda makes you realise how starving people must have been to turn to such food sources.


      Personally you will have to prise the green beans out of my cold dead lifeless hands, and I'm fond of peas and mangetouts occasionally.


      I wonder if since they are not yet mature like the hard beans, they haven't had time to build up a full complement of lectins?


      IMNSHO Grok must have evolved the ability to deal with small acute doses of toxins, and in fact other species also have evolved to use some plants' defence chemicals as drugs and medications. Where it goes pear shaped is with long term chronic exposures, such as to Healthy Whole Grains with every meal. There are benefits as well as costs to many food sources.

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      • #48
        1



        What the hell is a mangetoot? Why don't you people learn to speak English???

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        • #49
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          OTB, "mangetout", another name for snap peas, comes from French but seems perfectly regular in English too. For example, Wikipedia tells us:


          Snap peas (also known as sugarsnap peas or mangetout) are a cultivar group of edible-podded peas that differ from snow peas in that their pods are round as opposed to flat. Snap peas like all other peas are pod fruits.


          As a person for whom English is only his third language, I find that your reaction is a little bit harsh...


          Hasta la vista! ;-)


          Murat

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          • #50
            1



            @murat, did you not see the smiey face after I dissed the UK speakers of English? Not harsh, an attempt at humor. Or, using a famous quote. "America and Britain. Two nations separated by a common language."


            I assure you "mangetout" is not in regular usage on this side of the Atlantic. Despite being pretty well educated, having been an intensive gardener with a landscaping business once, and of course, an eater of foods, I've never heard of "mangetout."


            So, a reasonable question.

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            • #51
              1



              You are wright, I have only seen it after having pushed the "Send Post" button, and it is completely my fault, since I have effectively found your reply strange, especially coming from you. I should have looked even more carefully then :-) Also, not taking part in the old US/GB "friendship", I was not sensitive to this dimension. The Wikipedia post is quite strange then, because I have always thought that, Wikipedia.org posts were mainly US based... Another error, probably.

              I have checked in the French-English Harrap's, it proposes string peas for the US translation of mange-tout.


              Best regards,


              Murat

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              • #52
                1



                No problem at all, Murat. It takes a good person to admit their errors.


                I would bet that most Wikipedia entries in the English language do come from the US. By sheer population and numbers on line early on. I find a fair amount of errors on assorted topics. Still, a great resource.

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                • #53
                  1



                  well, whatever you call 'em, I loves me some pea pods & green beans! (& asparagus) & I always munch on all of them raw on the way home. I'm not paleo, so I'm gonna keep eating them. Raw, added to salads, pickled (green beans), sauted in evoo with garlic...


                  What I want to know is, how come I never got picked for a random UA (where I used to work) when I had me a good batch of asparagus pee brewing? I always wanted to give them a "special" specimen :-)

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                  • #54
                    1



                    Peggy you could always take some alpha lipoic acid to simulate the asparagus pee, its pretty much the same, and cheaper than trying to keep a bunch of said around 'just in case'.


                    why didnt Grok eat emu? the emu is part of the australian aboriginal 'creation myth', and they are hunter gatherers. emu, kangaroo, snake, witchety grubs, wombats, koalas all fair game.

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                    • #55
                      1



                      "I assure you "mangetout" is not in regular usage on this side of the Atlantic. Despite being pretty well educated, having been an intensive gardener with a landscaping business once, and of course, an eater of foods, I've never heard of "mangetout.""


                      (grins) it takes a lot to offend me. Strange I hadn't realised that. Actually that's what we call the little flat pea pods with the tiny peas embedded, the rounder sugar snap ones we call sugar snap. Go figure . . .


                      The history of food names in the UK used to have the Anglo Saxon words for the animal and the French word for the finished products (cow/beef, swine/pork etc.) but in recent years we are bombarded with trendy names from many parts of the world. When I was young we had cos lettuce, rocket and lucerne, now we have romaine, arugula and alfalfa. What you call rutabaga we still call Swedes.


                      Two diets divided by a common language . . .

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                      • #56
                        1



                        same goes for courgette (zucchini) and aubergine (egg plant)

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                        • #57
                          1



                          what about string beans? are they toxic?

                          I will be normal. I will be NORMAL again
                          Yeah!

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                          • #58
                            1



                            "Toxic" is bandied about here like there is a LD100 rate of two beans. (Lethal Dose, 100% death rate in a population.)


                            All beans start out with a fleshy shell. Very edible and I can not understand why some think it bad. Yes, there are some tiny beans within, but as a percentage they are next to nothing.


                            As best as I can figure out beans are on the you-know-what list because of the lectins within. They can cause all kinds of protein allergies, either directly or indirectly. I was reading a vegetarian body building page the other day and this guy came to the realization that he can't eat beans. Bloating, gas, and just feeling like crap. He decided that he's lectin intolerant.


                            OTOH, literally billions of people depend on beans for adequate protein. For them, I would guess whatever lectins MIGHT do comes second to what starvation definitely does.


                            Man, I do so miss my black beans, pintos, and of course, baked. Hardest part of going paleo/primal.

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                            • #59
                              1



                              Sorry to resurrect a somewhat old post, but green beans were just mentioned on Robb Wolf's podcast "the Paleolithic Solution" and i thought it was worth sharing:


                              http://robbwolf.com/2010/01/26/the-paleolithic-solution-episode-12/


                              He points out that the reason most legumes are off negative is the large amounts of lectin and green beans don't have that. he calls them "benign" and says he eats them all the time.


                              i think where paleo gets a bad wrap is when it sounds silly when the only reason people know they don't eat something is because "it didn't exist 12,000 years ago"when in actuality there is a real reason related to how that food interacts with your body as to why you shouldn't eat it.


                              on the same hand, if a legume is lacking the negative lectins and carb load... it is just fine.

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                              • #60
                                1



                                I would say they are in the grey area like milk...

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