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are peas and green beans okay?

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  • #16
    1



    green beans,for me personally,digest like a green vegetable and not a starchy legume.


    Peas on the other hand...not so much

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    • #17
      1



      bad link above

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulse_(legume)


      I don't know if that one will work either though

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      • #18
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        No, it won't, legume is getting cut off.


        Oh wait.. maybe wikipedia means green beans aren't pulses. Oh well. I like them-- green beans, that is.

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        • #19
          1



          thanks for all the great replies. and i totally agree that we all need to choose what is right for us. but one thing i was hoping for was an idea of why these items might be less harmful than other legumes. i don't notice mark providing recipes with lentils or kidney beans so my reasoning was that if he includes peas and green beans in his diet [whether often or seldom] then is it because they have more value than other legumes? do they not have the same levels of antinutrients? or are they just lower carb? knowing why [scientifically] they might be a decent exception helps me to decide if, and how often, i may want to include them. i really like both and have always considered them veggies [esp green beans].


          does that make sense?

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          • #20
            1



            Legume or not, green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) is a domesticated plant, so technically it's not paleo.


            To what extent are they bad if prepared properly, I don't know. But there's some research about it:

            http://tinyurl.com/qvdld4

            “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
            "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
            "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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            • #21
              1



              So does that mean that anything grown in a pod is considered non-paleo?


              Also, domesticated plant? So you're saying that a paleo person can't eat anything that is grown on a farm? Or are you saying domesticated because it's been grown/bred to be that way?

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              • #22
                1



                I know that all legumes have pods, but I am not sure about the opposite.


                Basically, paleo food was found in pre-agrarian times, is palatable and can be eaten raw. Domesticated plants are, by definition, not paleo.


                Picture Grok wandering a fertile land while hungry before agriculture had been discovered. What would he eat? Thats paleo food.

                “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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                • #23
                  1



                  Okay, I'm still confused about what a domesticated plant is.

                  But by the definition of the food being found pre-agrarian times you could argue that any plant could have been found in the wild and eaten. So why are certain plants not aloud?

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                  • #24
                    1



                    In my own words, a domesticated plant is the result of a "wild" plant being artificially selected so that it acquires one or more desired characteristics.


                    I believe we evolved a preference for certain tastes in order to discriminate the good from the bad things to eat, hence my mention of "palatable" as a condition for a food to be primal. If it grew around us, and we evolved to like it, it's probably good for us.

                    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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                    • #25
                      1



                      Green beans are the unripe fruit of a variety of bean types. See here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_beans

                      That includes the common bean, which includes black, kidney, pinto, white, etc. beans.

                      I think the reason they're classified as "vegetables" and not as "pulses" is probably due to a couple reasons. It's green and is typically eaten like a vegetable, e.g. meat, mashed potatoes, and green beans (in lieu of broccoli, etc.). Also, it benefits the agricultural industry because now they're more able to sell green beans into school lunch programs, etc., and people will buy them thinking they're getting a spinach-equivalent green vegetable. For that reason things like ketchup and mashed potatoes are also sometimes considered vegetables.


                      Green peas are quite sugary -- a cup of green peas has 21g carbs, 14g minus fiber, and 8g of that 14g is simple sugar.

                      I'm not sure of the lectin/phytic acid content of either green beans or peas, but they're technically not vegetables, and they've got a fair bit of sugar in them. I personally avoid them just because I'm minimizing carbohydrates. Obviously, whether to eat them is an individual decision, though.

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                      • #26
                        1



                        Ok, nix green beans.

                        How about asparagus?

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                        • #27
                          1



                          Asparagus is definitely a vegetable, and grows wild around Europe. Carb-wise, I put it in the same category as broccoli (more than leafy greens, but less than root vegetables like carrots), which is more something to be aware of if you're really trying to get into ketosis.

                          Incidentally, nightshades are good for something here: a tomato plant in your garden can help repel the asparagus beetle.

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                          • #28
                            1



                            Well, that's good.


                            I love asparagus and I love the resulting asparagus pee! haha.. it's so fun.

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                            • #29
                              1



                              Just be glad you don't ever have to have asparagus pee at a urinal. Ugh.

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                              • #30
                                1



                                It's good for marking territory

                                “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                                "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                                "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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