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  • Neanderthal vs Homo Sapien?

    http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/...ion/built1.htm

    http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/...ion/built2.htm

    Wonder if it was even possible, Mark.

  • #2
    They walk amongst us...!

    Heck, I have always considered myself to be part Neanderthal! Broad shoulders, short, barrel chested.

    Comment


    • #3
      I guess so...

      hmmm...interesting to note. For me, I'm not sure what I am.heheheh..

      I think that the article was a great laugh as well mostly because there were Neanderthal statistics that the modern man can definitely shoot for. That's pretty cool even if people think it's too much a romantic act than by scientific fact. I don't really care actually, because those are the joys of myths, legends and people still enjoy them today, so it doesn't really bother me. It's fun to keep searching. Makes life worth it.

      In terms of the Neanderthal, I hope John Berardi does an article that instead of just using vital stats and measuring up spectrum of physical abilities, I wish he could do an article concerning the sex drive of the Neanderthal vs the Homo Sapien (Cro Magnum). Also, i'm interested to know about the size of the Neanderthal men's penis back then, as well as the Homo Sapien. Adding to that, the measuring up as well. heheheh. I guess, i'm gay, don't know really. But, I guess i'm just curious. Wondering if women had a good time back then too because of member sizes or sex drives. Very interesting to find out. heheheheh. If ever they did have large members, do we as very modern man, measure up? (no pun intended). That's a good question, I think. heheh

      Comment


      • #4
        I have no idea about what Neanderthals preferred, but here is something about ancient Greeks from an old post of mine in another thread.

        Here is the 'official' description of the classic ideal of masculine beauty. You especially need to check the last sentance to see how far we have strayed.

        From:
        The Perfect Body
        by Simon Goldhill
        An excerpt from Love, Sex & Tragedy: How the Ancient World Shapes Our Lives



        Classical artists depicted the athlete’s ideal body which Lucian so enthusiastically described. … The body should be, as Lucian insists, lean but well built—bulked up from exercise but not fat or over-muscled like a modern body-builder. The muscles should be well defined (‘etched’) with a six-pack stomach and cut pectorals, and the torso should reveal an iliac crest, the sharp line or fold running above the groin and up over the hip, a physical characteristic that can be revealed only when the muscles are very strongly developed but the body is exceptionally lean—and which Greek sculptures emphasize in a way impossible to achieve in real life. Thighs are powerful, calves sharply articulated, penis small (always), and, since these are beautiful young men, they have no beards yet, but they do have carefully done hair.
        Tayatha om bekandze

        Bekandze maha bekandze

        Randza samu gate soha

        Comment


        • #5
          woooooooooooo...like those descriptions. Though the penis would classically be small due to the great proportioned upper body of classic Greek and Roman sculptures as well as a muscular set of legs. In a way, it is a strong supposition to think that we cannot achieve such heights of physical perfection (the same goes for women: bust and butt, very few have attained it.) but I guess, the most fun part would be to try and give your best in attaining it, of course, with natural means. Thanks for the excerpt. Nice descriptions. I have comments as to accuracy of data by the author, but I don't really care. I have found no such value in criticizing people, but rather, I accept their viewpoints or not, I do not need to tell them they are wrong or whatsoever. I have simply been thankful for their help in molding my spirit. So Phil_SC and Periquin, thank you and I appreciate the help.

          Comment


          • #6
            That post of mine is one man's opinion of what the ancients considered to be perfect. I posted it for humor if nothing else.

            The sculptors depicted ideal bodies, not real bodies. I doubt that all Greeks and Romans looked like those statues.

            Do models---male and female---really represent the general population?
            Tayatha om bekandze

            Bekandze maha bekandze

            Randza samu gate soha

            Comment


            • #7
              Most definitely, no. What I am simply saying is that, it's fun to shoot for that perfect thing once in a while. Most of the time we lead ordinary tasks, we might as well make them extraordinary to give some life within our lives.

              Comment


              • #8
                Neanderthal vs Homo Sapien

                This also would raise questions with the David and Goliath story. Neanderthals by evidence were larger and extremely stronger then those of Homo Sapien ancestry. This could explain Goliaths exaggerated size compared to David.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Interesting idea, but I tend to doubt that Goliath was a Neanderthal.

                  Giants are a reality. They exist today and no doubt existed long ago. A sad thing about giants is the tendency to a lack of nimbleness and dexterity and a shortened life span.

                  Goliath's major value was most likely intimidation, although fighting skill could have been there too.

                  Let's consider David. He was a young man, a shepherd. We read in the account that he was skillful with the sling, having already beaten lions and maybe tigers and bears. Something that many people don't realize is that the sling was a formidable weapon. Phonecians and Sumerians were feared because of their units of slingers.

                  So David was skilled with a very efficient weapon. Now, his faith in God. Had his faith in God been so profound, he would not have needed his sling. " I'll go down there and God will take care of it." No. He probably had faith in God, but in this instance, his faith was in his skill with the sling, and maybe in his knowledge of how slow moving giants were. He figured,"I can hit anything, especially when it doesn't dodge very well."

                  Now, I don't want to disparage David. I hear he was an especially accomplished musician. In fact, to paraphrase one my favorite philosophers and students of human accomplishments,Flip Wlson, "Little Davey was a super fine musician. Could sure play a mean lute."

                  No. David was an all-round good guy, brave and full of vim and vigor to serve his nation and king.

                  He was destined to win because he had superior weaponry as long as he stayed out of Goliath's reach.

                  Goliath, well, he didn't expect what happened. A sling, a stone, Nah. Such a thing never entered his head before. When that little shaver gets down here I'll get my sword from my sword caddy and end it. Well, it started and was over before Goliath was ready to fight. David never called out "En Garde" or anything like that. Just sent the stone sailing without the pre-fight hand shake. Goliath went down.

                  Nice story, but not all that wonderful as people make it.

                  Anyway, no sign of Neanderthal versus Sapien. I am open to reason though.
                  Tayatha om bekandze

                  Bekandze maha bekandze

                  Randza samu gate soha

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    wow, thanks for posting this, it was a good read
                    Starting Weight : 338lbs 6/11/2010
                    Current Weight: 266lbs
                    High-school Weight: 235lbs
                    Goal: ????

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jeeruid View Post
                      h Also, i'm interested to know about the size of the Neanderthal men's penis back then, as well as the Homo Sapien.
                      Gorillas are very muscular but have small testes - don't know about their penises. Chimpanzees on the other hand have large testes.

                      When it comes to cojones it seems size is determined by the animal's behaviour and not its size or muscularity. Gorillas keep harems so don't need to compete with other males. Chimps are in sexual competition with other males, so need to be able to produce more sperm.

                      http://www.anthro.ucdavis.edu/facult...t/stpballs.htm

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by periquin View Post
                        No. David was an all-round good guy, brave and full of vim and vigor to serve his nation and king.
                        David seduced Bathsheba, the wife of one of his soldiers then sent the soldier to the front lines of a city he wanted to take in the hopes that he would be killed. When the soldier was killed in combat, he married Bathsheba. Not the act of an all-round good guy.

                        There were giant skeletons found in different places throughout the world. There are also stories from ancient times (notably in the Bible ) about giants . Native Americans associated the giants with ICE strangely enough, the Norse Myths also had tales of Ice giants.

                        http://www.scribd.com/doc/7494553/Gi...-North-America

                        I hope DNA that DNA tests will be done eventually on those giant skeletons and on the cone shaped heads found in Central America.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I wonder what folks think of the last couple of paragraphs:

                          Eat Like The Ancients?

                          So now that we've discussed our evolution as well as our ancestors' dietary
                          intake, hopefully it's clear that invoking a "paleo" diet in the name of lean
                          bodies, big muscles, and disease prevention is a bit misleading for the
                          following reasons:

                          1. For starters, there was no "paleo" diet. The ancients ate what they could,
                          when they could, where they could. Their (and our) genes were well adapted to a variety of dietary intakes. If there was one common "paleo" feature it was this — they didn't eat processed foods or feed-lot animals.

                          They ate foods in their natural state with little processing and they certainly
                          profited from this lack of "manipulated food." Of course, we'd profit too if
                          we'd stop being so lazy and start taking an interest in what we're feeding our
                          bodies. But come on now, do we really need to examine the evolutionary record to realize that Wonder Bread and McDonalds are bad for us?

                          2. Secondly, there is no single, big muscled, ripped-up, ancient prototype.
                          Bodies in ancient times were almost as diverse as we see them today, outliers like Ronnie Coleman and the 1000lb man removed. Of course, in ancient times, bodies were shifted more toward the lean end of the spectrum as a result of 2 things: first — food scarcity, second — the high energy cost of obtaining food. Eliminate our current food surplus and get us to move around more and obesity would disappear overnight. Again, it doesn't take an evolutionary expert or a hunter-gatherer to teach us that eating less crappy food and exercising more means fewer fatties.

                          3. Finally, the lower incidence of disease in our ancestors was likely due to
                          one or a combination of the following factors. First, they had a high fruit and
                          vegetable intake and there's a correlation between fruit and veggie intake and disease protection.

                          Secondly, hunter-gatherers were much more active than the cubicle-dweller and as activity levels are associated with disease risk, it's easy to understand why our technologically assisted society is suffering at the hands of CVD, obesity, and diabetes.

                          Finally, early moderns simply didn't live as long as we do. Many of our current diseases of aging begin to show up after our 30s. As the average age of our Paleolithic ancestors was 32, perhaps they simply didn't live long enough to manifest the diseases of aging. Modern medicine allows us to live seven to ten decades when our ancestors couldn't.

                          Yes, there were some Paleolithic people who lived well into their 40's and 50's, and yes, there were some Paleolithic people who clearly died of debilitating diseases, but they were not typical.

                          In the end, to attribute some magical, mystical, muscle building, fat reducing, disease preventing powers to the diets of the ancients is an oversimplification at best, and at worst, it is purposefully misleading people in an attempt to fleece them of their money.

                          The ancients lived completely different lives, lives that few of us today would
                          choose if given the option. Therefore, rather than trying to mimic the ancients, we need to find ways to develop healthy lifestyle patterns relevant to today's world. Sometimes there's overlap. Yet there's no need to try to "eat like a caveman" when you can eat like a healthy modern man instead.
                          Apathy is tyranny's greatest ally.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Acteon View Post
                            David seduced Bathsheba, the wife of one of his soldiers then sent the soldier to the front lines of a city he wanted to take in the hopes that he would be killed. When the soldier was killed in combat, he married Bathsheba. Not the act of an all-round good guy.

                            There were giant skeletons found in different places throughout the world. There are also stories from ancient times (notably in the Bible ) about giants . Native Americans associated the giants with ICE strangely enough, the Norse Myths also had tales of Ice giants.

                            http://www.scribd.com/doc/7494553/Gi...-North-America

                            I hope DNA that DNA tests will be done eventually on those giant skeletons and on the cone shaped heads found in Central America.
                            I saw something about this on TV a while back. There's strong evidence that the belief of "giants" comes from incomplete fossils that locals may have unearthed: namely mammoths. The large opening from the trunk strongly resembles a single large eye in the center of the forehead (think "The Odessey") with two small holes low and on the sides of the skull that resemble ears. Given the Ice Ages and prevalence of mammoths throughout the world you can see why most cultures would have these legends.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jason VT View Post
                              I saw something about this on TV a while back. There's strong evidence that the belief of "giants" comes from incomplete fossils that locals may have unearthed: namely mammoths. The large opening from the trunk strongly resembles a single large eye in the center of the forehead (think "The Odessey") with two small holes low and on the sides of the skull that resemble ears. Given the Ice Ages and prevalence of mammoths throughout the world you can see why most cultures would have these legends.
                              I've always wondered whether or not giants were just really big people (possibly tribes of them) and the tales became exaggerated over generations. Before modern communication most people went through their lives without encountering, first hand, someone who was not average. So meeting a person a head taller than everybody else would make them a giant to you.
                              A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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