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Floor Living: Do You Spend Enough Time on the Ground?

Posted By Mark Sisson On March 5, 2013 @ 8:00 am In Health | 130 Comments

Several weeks ago, I asked readers how much floor living [7] they did and linked to an interesting blog post from Chris Highcock discussing the “archetypal postures” [8] of ground-based sitting, squatting [9], and kneeling. My interest persisted, and I thought a full-on post about the potential benefits and logistics of spending more time on the floor would be fun and helpful.

I’ve found that there aren’t very many studies examining the effects of floor sitting/kneeling/squatting on health, posture [10], or pain. You’ve got the “stability ball literature” (long story short: sitting on a stability ball [11] tends to “increase the level of discomfort”), but sitting on an inflated unstable sphere is more physiologically novel than a regular chair. I’m not sure there’s much benefit and it looks pretty silly. (But if it works for you… [12]) There’s also a brief study [13] that showed sitting in a backless chair improved levels of consciousness in patients with prolonged consciousness disturbance. For the most part, though, it’s a pretty barren landscape of research.

I think that’s okay. I’m not entirely convinced we always need research to confirm what we already (should) implicitly know.

Sometimes hard data isn’t really needed, especially when you consider two unassailable facts about our relationship with the floor. First, individually, we all start out on the floor. As babies, we lie there, essentially kicking things off as eating, pooping sacks of wiggling, basically immobile flesh. Then, we graduate to flipping over onto our stomachs, lolling our heads around (once we develop sufficient neck strength), crawling toward vacant electrical sockets, hesitantly standing, and finally walking. It’s on the floor that we learn to move. We may not be doing terribly complex or impressive stuff down there, but that first year or two is incredibly formative for the rest of our movement lives. We’re building a foundation made primarily of contralateral crawling and “tummy time.” Graduating beyond the floor to full on bipedalism doesn’t mean we should totally ignore where we came from.

Second, chairs are a recent invention. Folks as early as the ancient Egyptians had them, but they were a luxury item reserved for the upper classes. Your average Neolithic human sat on chests or benches until chairs became a mass-produced staple that everyone could afford. Earlier than that, for most of human history, formal-sitting furniture simply didn’t exist. Paleolithic posteriors surely rested upon rocks and logs and stumps when the opportunity arose, but those aren’t the same as having permanent fixtures that allow you to take a load off whenever you want. Human bodies were not designed with chairs in mind. We did do a lot of lounging around – I’m not arguing we never stopped moving or anything – but we did so on the ground, rather than on a bunch of folding chairs.

Sitting down in a chair does funny things to our bodies. It stretches out our glutes, making them inactive, loose, and weak. People by and large no longer know how to activate their butt muscles due to excessive amounts of chair sitting. Sitting in a chair also keeps the hip flexors in a short, tight, contracted position for extended amounts of time, which can inhibit full hip extension and lead to that hunched over position you often see older folks shuffling around with. And that’s not even mentioning the extensive (and growing) literature showing how sitting for too long increases mortality and degenerative disease, which I’ve covered in plenty of posts and Weekend Link Loves [14]. This post isn’t really about that, anyway.

What might be most important, though, is what sitting in a chair doesn’t do. It doesn’t allow us to rest in the full squat position [15], an ability we’re born with but quickly forget how to do. It doesn’t let us do much of anything. Sitting becomes a totally passive act, where we’re slumped over, shoulders rounded, feet twisted up and resting on the chair legs, totally dependent on the structure of the chair to support our weight – rather than using our musculature and arranging our skeletal system in such a way that we support ourselves. Doesn’t it seem inconceivable that an animal – any animal – would evolve to require furniture in order to rest comfortably without incurring a disability?

That’s partly why it makes some sense to hang out on the floor more. We need the “stress” of supporting our own body weight and making sure our structures are in alignment. Here are a few positions to try out:

The squat – The default resting position of humans. Kids can do this easily, but once they start going to school and sitting in a chair for six hours a day, they lose it. The goal here is to get your heels on the ground. Resting on the balls of your feet is easier, but it’s harder on your knees and thighs. The heels-down squat [16], which requires more flexibility but distributes the pressure across your hips, is far more sustainable. Check out the ease with which these Hadza Bushmen are able to rest in the full squat [17], as well as their ability to move in every direction from that position. If you’re having trouble, here are some nice tips from Todd Hargrove [18].

Seiza – The formal way to sit in Japan [19], resting on the lower legs, butt on heels. Placing a small pillow or rolled up towel under your knees can make the transition easier, especially if you have a bad knee or two.

Half kneel – Like seiza, except one of your feet is on the ground, heel down, in front of you in a squat position. Like these guys [20].

Crossed legs – For many people, this is the most comfortable, natural way to sit on the floor. You can place your feet flat against each other, cross at the ankles, or place your calves against each other. You can even go full lotus. There are many variations, but here’s the most basic way [21].

Crossed leg variation – This is one my favorite ways to sit. From the basic crossed leg position, place one hand flat on the floor and lean on it. Bring the opposite leg up and place the foot flat on the floor. Your opposite leg will be in a squat position. Switch hands and legs if it gets uncomfortable. It looks like this [22] (except without the creepy eyes) or this [23]. Or this [24] (even better).

Make up your own – Human limbs are funny, bendy things. We can contort ourselves into lots of positions, and as long as you’re on the floor, supporting your own weight and feel comfortable doing it, it’s difficult to hurt yourself. Our bodies are good at giving feedback before things go really wrong. If your arm starts to go numb or your toes get tingly, switch it up! Try coming up with some of your own variations for sitting on the ground and report back.

CrawlContralateral crawling [25] is one of the most fundamental ways to move. It’s a strong developer of shoulder and hip mobility and strength, and it’s simply a fun way to see and experience the world.

Now that you have some idea of what to do when you’re on the ground, I’d like you to spend the next week doing as much floor living as possible. I don’t expect you to ditch the office chair and roll around the ground while at work, but I do expect you to get in some quality floor time when you’re at home.

Watch TV on the floor. There’s nothing inherently wrong with TV. Sure, it can be taken to the extreme and crowd out active living [26], but it’s arguably a golden age of television as far as quality goes. The couch sitting, though, is what gets you.

Eat dinner on the floor. This isn’t something I created out of thin air; plenty of cultures eat dinner on the ground.

Try different positions. You’ll probably find that floor living is a constantly shifting existence, where instead of remaining in the same position for hours at a time, you’re moving around all the time without even trying. You’re switching from the right arm to the left arm to the right elbow to the full lotus position to the half kneel to the full kneel to the full squat just in the first two hours.

Practice moving between positions. Go from standing to a half kneel to a kneel to a seiza to a kneel to a half kneel to standing.

Practice standing up. We can’t live on the floor all the time. Sometimes, we need to stand up and get on with our lives. A smooth transition between floor living and standing is key to health and mobility [27]. For an example transition, check out one of my buddy Erwan’s (of MovNat) methods [28].

Spend at least an hour a day sitting on the ground and another fifteen minutes practicing different ways to move between positions and another fifteen practicing how to stand up and sit back down. Shoot for ten minutes of crawling, too. You can do most of these things while doing other things, like watching TV or reading or talking, so it’s not like you’re wasting time. My guess is that you’ll take to this like a fish to water.

Why is this so important? The way we sit, and where we do it, changes the function of our bodies. It even alters the length of musculature [29]. In countries where squatting and other forms of floor living are seamlessly weaved into everyday life, people still retain the mobility to do all that stuff into old age. I’ve got a buddy from Thailand who moved over to Hollywood as a teenager in the late sixties and still retains the ability to sit in a full squat, painlessly and effortlessly. This guy is an avid user of chairs and everything Western; not a gymgoer at all, and he’s never even heard of a foam roller or Mobility WOD, but because he got the right floor living experience during the formative years, he can still squat and move around on the floor. Unfortunately, for many of us in Western countries who stopped floor living right around age four or five, we may never quite get there – but we can certainly do a lot better than we are now.

Let’s hear from you guys. How do you handle yourselves on the floor? What’s your favorite go-to position?


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[7] I asked readers how much floor living: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/weekend-link-love-225/#axzz2LWaUTRlO

[8] interesting blog post from Chris Highcock discussing the “archetypal postures”: http://conditioningresearch.blogspot.com/2013/01/floor-living.html

[9] squatting: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-proper-squat-technique/

[10] posture: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/improve-posture/

[11] sitting on a stability ball: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16696264

[12] But if it works for you…: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-self-experimentation-matters/

[13] study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21796026

[14] I’ve covered in plenty of posts and Weekend Link Loves: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/sitting-unhealthy/

[15] full squat position: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-squat-properly/

[16] heels-down squat: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/squatting-advice-high-crp-glutathione/

[17] Hadza Bushmen are able to rest in the full squat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y619h01VUDE&list=UUu2PZY56Iire8YYJgfHB6Bg&index=10

[18] here are some nice tips from Todd Hargrove: http://www.bettermovement.org/2011/free-audio-lesson-squat-fundamentals-volume-1/

[19] formal way to sit in Japan: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_IChGNdWYIi4/Sy0iwohw5mI/AAAAAAAAATo/C9jPIwI8WVw/s400/Seiza_01.gif

[20] Like these guys: http://phillipbeach.com/images/archetypal_postures/bushmen-sepia.jpg

[21] most basic way: http://www3.artflakes.com/artwork/products/298767/poster/483bed60c203dd118ba8c7187ec3e72a.jpg

[22] looks like this: http://www.suzannakempner.co.uk/images/CD-Cover-sitting-on-floor-w.jpg

[23] this: http://static6.depositphotos.com/1000816/549/i/950/depositphotos_5499600-Handsome-businessman-sitting-on-the-floor-.-Isolated-over-white-background.jpg

[24] this: http://phillipbeach.com/images/archetypal_postures/bonobo-colour-2.jpg

[25] Contralateral crawling: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-grok-crawl/#axzz2MbjqMRnk

[26] crowd out active living: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/are-you-living-an-active-or-passive-life/

[27] smooth transition between floor living and standing is key to health and mobility: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57559095/sitting-and-standing-test-may-predict-mortality/

[28] Erwan’s (of MovNat) methods: http://www.movnat.com/movement-highlight-lateral-four-sitting-to-tall-split-kneeling-to-tall-half-kneeling/

[29] alters the length of musculature: http://www.pnas.org/content/110/4/1237.abstract

[30] Find Out How>>: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/get-help/?utm_source=mda&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=mda_footer_get_help

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