Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Archive for the ‘ Research Analysis ’ Category

20 Jun

Have You Decided to Be Healthy?

For some people, it’s a New Year’s resolution. For others, the scare of a close friend’s or relative’s illness. Maybe it’s a scary diagnosis of their own. Oftentimes, it’s a long pondered goal. Yet even when it’s more of a “spur of the moment” pledge, the decision to be healthy usually comes after good thought […]

19 Jun

Cold Water Therapy

You’re in the middle of a nice, hot shower, feeling your muscles relax, the day’s tension (or night’s sleepiness) melt away. As you bask in the quiet moment of repose, suddenly your body gets a startling jolt. After a second of disoriented shock, you realize something has happened to the hot water. Did someone start […]

15 Jun

Save a Few Bucks, Gain a Few Pounds

The stories are everywhere on news broadcasts, mornings shows, and magazines. Bulk shopping, particularly as it’s defined by stock images of Sam’s Club and Costco, is the key to the current economic crunch, the newscasters tell us. Footage clip after clip show the enormous carts filled to the brim with essentials like toilet paper, diapers, […]

13 Jun

The Importance of Blood Sugar Level

Think this is a post about diabetes? Nope. (Although you wouldn’t be alone in that assumption…) In this country, if you don’t have diabetes, you’re supposedly in the clear. Not so fast, we say! Research from New Zealand offers “the largest study to date of [hemoglobin] A1C levels and subsequent mortality risk” in men and […]

6 Jun

Some Very Intense News

A study (abstract here) published online in the American Journal of Physiology, Regulatory, Integrative & Comparative Physiology suggests that short but intense bouts of exercise can confer the same health benefits for the heart as longer, less-intense activities. For the study, researchers from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada recruited 20 healthy but untrained individuals and […]

5 Jun

Primal Lifestyle Good for Your Heart?

Following a primal eating plan rich in meat, vegetables, berries and nuts may reduce the risk of heart disease, according to a small study published this month in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. For the study, researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden recruited 14 healthy volunteers to ditch their normal diet in favor […]

3 Jun

Plants Preserve Muscle Mass

We’ve always been dear friends, staunch allies, and devoted advocates for our edible friends in the plant kingdom. Whatever craziness descends upon our lives and our society, there’s sanity, indeed healthful respite in a bountiful, brimming, vibrant dinner plate of vegetables. And now there’s even more reason for veggie veneration. Research from Tufts University funded […]

31 May

Vitamin D and RDA for Children

It’s probably of little surprise that we take issue with some of the Recommended Daily Allowance values and how they’re often determined. Case in point: New research published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism suggests that the current children’s RDA for Vitamin D (200 IUs) does not sufficiently support the “bone growth and […]

30 May

The Power of the Placebo

A number of months ago we reported that some 45% of Chicago internists (among those who responded to a survey) said they offered placebos to their patients from time to time. The report got people around the country talking – and maybe even wondering about their own prescription history. Clearly, physicians recognize the impact of […]

25 May

Not Enough B-6?

Researchers from Tufts University have found that people may not be getting enough vitamin B-6 with the current Recommended Daily Allowance of 2 milligrams. And that goes double for certain groups. Vitamin B-6 plays an integral role in the formation of red blood cells, regulation of blood glucose, digestion of protein, and the function of […]

24 May

Fasting May Stave Off Jet Lag

If you’ve ever taken an intercontinental flight – or heck, jetted from coast to coast – chances are you’re probably no stranger to jet lag. Now, new research from Harvard University suggests that simply changing your meal times can help speed your adjustment to a new time zone. When we discuss jet lag, what we’re […]

20 May

Epigenetics and Depression

We just can’t help it. This epigenetics stuff really floats our boat. The last few weeks we’ve brought you a Dear Mark primer on gene expression as well as news on recent studies examining the role of lifestyle/environment on genetic expression. Diabetes, heart disease, even lung function are impacted by external factors like nutrition, exercise, […]

10 May

Metabolic Fingerprinting

Yes, it’s oh-so-middle-school, but we called it! Following the first ever metabolome-wide association study conducted across four countries, researchers are affirming the promise of metabolic fingerprinting in studying the links diet and other lifestyle factors have with specific disease risk. Once again, the focus is on gene expression, the resulting phenotype rather than our initial […]

3 May

Hormones and Heart Disease

We aren’t talking estrogen here, but this latest news does concern the ladies of the community. In the recent “Hunt Study” conducted by researchers at the Norwegian University of Science, women with thyroid function in the less active part of the “normal” clinical reference range showed an increased risk for fatal coronary heart disease relative […]

30 Apr

The Heparin Controversy

This morning’s New York Times reports that the FDA is now echoing what many scientists and industry experts have been saying for weeks: the contaminated stores of heparin that have been associated with 81 deaths and 785 severe allergic reactions in the U.S. was likely adulterated on purpose. In March, the FDA issued a major […]

29 Apr

News on the Seedling Front

A report out this week offered some of the latest news on children’s health in the United States. Researchers from Duke University and the Foundation for Child Development studied trends in the health of children up to eleven years of age. We always want the good news first, right? Researchers found some (very) positive trends, […]

27 Apr

Urban Areas Becoming Supermarket “Deserts”

A study published in the International Journal of Health Geographics suggests that as more and more supermarkets leave cities to set up shop (literally!) in the suburbs, urban areas are increasingly at risk of becoming “food deserts.” For the study, researchers at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, used geographic mapping techniques to […]

24 Apr

Gene Expression: Location, Location, Location

Geneticists at North Carolina State University have revealed an interesting lesson in gene expression: where you live can have significant impact on how your genes are expressed. The scientists focused on a sample of 46 Moroccan Amazighs, a relatively homogenous group genetically-speaking. The subjects included desert nomads, mountain agrarians and coastal urban residents. The researchers […]

20 Apr

Irradiated Food

Oh, the food supply, the food supply. It’s impossible to miss the media stories on the risks of food-borne illnesses like salmonella and E. coli. Meats, eggs, fruits and vegetables always seem to be the most insidious culprits. (But that Little Debbie snack cake, you’ll be relieved to know, is on the safe list.) We’ve […]

19 Apr

Move Your Body for Your Brain

A study presented Wednesday at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting suggests that regular physical exercise may offer a protective benefit against mild cognitive impairment. How cognitively impaired are we talking here? Think forgetting where you left your keys, remembering events, appointments, or to check Mark’s Daily Apple every day (as if you could […]

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