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A Reader Rants

Posted By Mark Sisson On November 28, 2006 @ 10:04 pm In Big Agra,Health,Hype,Nutrition,Sisson Said What? | No Comments

Junior Apple Sarah writes:

“I just saw something on the news for an e. coli antidote and how it will revolutionize not only the food industry but also healthcare. What ever happened to just making sure that the food and facilities are clean? It’s my understanding that e. coli comes from fecal matter. Is it too much to ask to keep poop off my food? Why do we have to put another chemical in something / everything we eat?”

A recent article [7] in the New York Times entitled “The Vegetable-Industrial Complex” deals with this issue at length. Writer Michael Pollan explores how modern food production yields more than bumper crops – it also yields very high potential for significant public health hazards. It’s the law of unintended consequences put to play on the dinner table.

I really recommend that you check out the article. In a nutshell:

- Modern food production has created two problems out of what was once a single solution. Animals fertilized crops, and crops fed animals. Pull them apart, mass produce them in factories and feedlots, and you have two problems:

1) As it collects in feedlots, manure becomes pollution, full of antibiotics, chemicals and e. coli, leading to the second problem:

2) Crops are now at risk for contamination, which invariably means crops get fertilized artificially. Great for the chemical industry, not so great for small farms, public health, economic efficiency, animals, or the earth.

- Calling for local, organic, small-time food production isn’t about being a dread-locked tree-hugger. It’s actually far more logical and economically viable to return to the way we used to do things. Small-scale food production is healthier. It’s easier to trace if something goes wrong, and fewer people are likely to be affected. Small-scale food production benefits small businesses instead of huge single food conglomerates. That means a freer market, more competition, better choice.

Everyone wins: small-scale farming is better for the environment and creates a solution whereas now we have two big problems.

- Small-scale farming also avoids the current obvious threat of terrorism. The article points out that our meat comes from but a few slaughterhouses. All the bagged spinach in the country passes through just four locations. How easy would it be for a terrorist to contaminate our food? That’s what Homeland Security is wondering.

Unfortunately, industrial food production looks to short-term, engineered fixes. When e. coli was found in the beef supply during the whole Jack in the Stomach fiasco of the 90s, producers just blasted the meat. (Pollan writes: Rather than clean up the kill floor and the feedlot diet, some meat processors simply started nuking the meat — sterilizing the manure, in other words, rather than removing it from our food.)

Why bother cleaning up the waste? It’s only our health on the line. I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if our government starts requiring that our entire food supply be irradiated.

- Finally, well-meaning though it may be, calling for even more regulation and inspection of our food actually makes things worse. What small-time farmer can afford the safety requirements when he’s only got 10 cows to milk? Lucerne, Darigold, et al, can afford the hassle of regulation. And the lobbyists. And the chemicals.

Short-term solutions = long-term disaster. You’d think we would learn by now to think about those unintended consequences.

Technorati Tags: Vegetable Industrial Complex [8], New York Times [9], fecal matter [10], poop [11], Lucerne [12], Darigold [13], dairy [14], spinach [15], terrorism threat [16], food supply [17], regulation [18], lobbyists [19], Michael Pollan [20]


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[8] Vegetable Industrial Complex: http://technorati.com/tag/Vegetable+Industrial+Complex

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[10] fecal matter: http://technorati.com/tag/fecal+matter

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[13] Darigold: http://technorati.com/tag/Darigold

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[15] spinach: http://technorati.com/tag/spinach

[16] terrorism threat: http://technorati.com/tag/terrorism+threat

[17] food supply: http://technorati.com/tag/food+supply

[18] regulation: http://technorati.com/tag/regulation

[19] lobbyists: http://technorati.com/tag/lobbyists

[20] Michael Pollan : http://technorati.com/tag/Michael+Pollan

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