Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Month: March 2013

Extrinsic and Intrinsic Rewards, or What Really Motivates You to Be Healthy

When you look back and think about your health journey (or your life in general), what have been the motivations that got you where you are today? Has it been a competitive spirit? An incessant curiosity? An individual sense of purpose? An ambitious drive? Inherent in these questions are the broader trends of initiative. Do you tend to seek out external challenges, validations, feedback to push yourself, or are you more often buoyed by personal inspiration? What impels you the most: the outcome or the pursuit? For many people, it’s a combination of both, and their answers depend on the activities in question. Nonetheless, knowing what most effectively motivates us in a particular endeavor can change the game in substantial ways.

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9 More Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

A few years back, I wrote an article explaining 17 possible reasons why you’re not losing weight. It was a troubleshooting guide of sorts, aimed at helping people identify some of things they may be doing (or not doing) that’s causing their stalled fat loss. The etiology of obesity and weight gain is multifactorial, and can be complex. Additionally, we’re all unique human beings. So it can be difficult to pin down one simple cause – or even seventeen simple causes. While unwanted fat loss comes effortlessly to most people that eat according to the Primal eating strategy – as the success stories and hundreds of thousands of positive user experiences indicate – sometimes we inadvertently sabotage our best efforts, stray from best practices, or don’t fully grok what we need to do to become efficient fat-burners. So let’s take a look at nine more possible reasons, shall we?

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Floor Living: Do You Spend Enough Time on the Ground?

Several weeks ago, I asked readers how much floor living they did and linked to an interesting blog post from Chris Highcock discussing the “archetypal postures” of ground-based sitting, squatting, and kneeling. My interest persisted, and I thought a full-on post about the potential benefits and logistics of spending more time on the floor would be fun and helpful.

I’ve found that there aren’t very many studies examining the effects of floor sitting/kneeling/squatting on health, posture, or pain. You’ve got the “stability ball literature” (long story short: sitting on a stability ball tends to “increase the level of discomfort”), but sitting on an inflated unstable sphere is more physiologically novel than a regular chair. I’m not sure there’s much benefit and it looks pretty silly. (But if it works for you…) There’s also a brief study that showed sitting in a backless chair improved levels of consciousness in patients with prolonged consciousness disturbance. For the most part, though, it’s a pretty barren landscape of research.

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Dear Mark: Obesogens, Tots Who Hate Veggies, and Pregnancy Recovery

For today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’ve got three topics for you. First are the obesogens, those endocrine-disrupting chemicals that permeate our environment, our foods, our consumer products, and even our bodies. They sound scary and terrible, but how much should we be worrying about them? Next up is the tot who hates his veggies, as classic a trope as any other. Should we be force feeding these kids broccoli, collard greens, and butternut squash at all costs? Or should we take a more laissez faire approach and let them develop their tastes on their own? Finally, I discuss the importance of proper pregnancy recovery, especially in regards to lifting heavy (and not so heavy but extremely wiggly) things.

Let’s go…

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Weekend Link Love – Edition 232

An important article from the Caltons on the deception of food science and what we can do about it.

Research of the Week

A week’s worth of bad sleep switches off hundreds of genes vital to protecting us from cancer, obesity, heart disease, and other degenerative diseases.

When you do switch to barefoot running, make sure you make the transition extremely carefully; a new study found that runners who switched over to Vibrams without changing anything about their routine were at a greater risk for foot injuries.

Interesting Blog Posts

Your brain on potato chips.

The synthetic diet revolution (the “perfectly balanced” drink is called, of course, soylent).

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Meat and Vegetable Skewers in Basil Marinade

When the whole family helps prepare a meal, cooking dinner feels less like a job and more like a party. Skewers are especially fun to cook because they allow kids to create and personalize their own meal rather than be handed food that someone else chose for them.

The more meat, seafood and vegetable options you provide, the better. It gives both kids (and adults) a chance to be creative and adventurous. Don’t exclude proteins or veggies that you think your family won’t eat – you might be surprised by the colorful and healthy skewers they put together.

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