Marks Daily Apple
Serving up health and fitness insights (daily, of course) with a side of irreverence.

Archive for May, 2010

22 May

Curried Salmon Salad

salmonsalad1For busy college students like Amy McMillin, easy-to-prepare meals that make the most out of a limited food budget are a necessity. “I like to make salads with fewer ingredients using unique combinations,” Amy told us, which is how she came up with her recipe for Curried Salmon Salad submitted for the Primal Blueprint Reader-Created Cookbook.

Salmon, lettuce, avocado, slivered almonds and green onions mixed with the complexity and bold flavors of an array of ground spices – garam masala, turmeric, coriander, cumin, cinnamon and cayenne – makes this a delicious Primal dish.

21 May

How to Maintain Shoulder Mobility and Scapular Stability

muscularshouldersMore than perhaps any other joint in our bodies, the shoulders demand close and careful attention. We use them on a daily basis and they travel a wide-ranging path; it’s in our best interest to assure that the path is the one of least resistance.

The tricky thing about maintaining good shoulder function is that it doesn’t just require strong deltoids or big traps. Those are important for moving big weight and being strong enough to handle anything life throws at you, but real shoulder function – pain-free, unimpeded shoulder function – depends on certain supporting muscles and joints of which most people are simply unaware. I mean, did you realize just how integral the scapular are? And because the shoulders’ function seems relatively straightforward and because we can work out for years without lending serious thought to how our joints move and work, now’s the time to start thinking about proper joint function before it’s too late.

20 May

The Importance of Shoulder Mobility and Scapular Stability

shoulderIf you’ve been following my series on joint mobility you’ll know that I’ve already covered how to improve and maintain joint mobility for the hips, thoracic spine, and ankles and wrists. Today and tomorrow I’ll be going over the shoulder. The shoulder is a tricky joint because it has to provide adequate stability while maintaining full mobility to prevent injury and maximize function and performance. If you look at yourself in the mirror and wave your arms around, you’ll see what I mean. If that doesn’t work, watch a swimmer, preferably one doing the IM, and watch the incredible range of motion in those shoulders. That’s what the human body is capable of.

Know what you’re looking for and you should be able to count ten different types of shoulder articulations. Ten! Contrast that with the hips (eight), the ankles (two), the wrists (four), or the spine (five), and the shoulder is clearly the most complicated joint with the greatest range of motion. Because “with great power comes great responsibility,” the shoulder is also perhaps the joint most vulnerable to injury. You can do a whole lot with a well-functioning shoulder joint, but you can also really mess yourself up and curtail your activity level for a long time if you get haphazard with its maintenance. Take it from a guy who messed his shoulder up more than once: shoulder health is absolutely required for an active, enriched life. And if you plan on attaining any sort of athletic competency on any level, you need good shoulders.

20 May

The Primal Blueprint Cookbook Now Shipping!

As I announced in yesterday’s newsletter, The Primal Blueprint Cookbook is now shipping.

The Primal Blueprint team is furiously packing to get all pre-orders out the door and into your hands as soon as possible. All pre-orders should be in the mail in the next few business days. Shipped USPS Media Mail the books should begin arriving at your doorsteps in the next week or so.

I’m absolutely thrilled with how it turned out. Take a look at the photos below for a taste of what’s headed your way, and if you haven’t grabbed a copy yet order one today and you’ll still get the free Primal Blueprint Poster and free S&H. (Free S&H for U.S. residents only. Reduced S&H for international orders.)

Stay tuned for today’s regularly scheduled blog post.

ThePrimalBlueprint5
19 May

The Power of Touch

TouchThe largest organ on our body is the skin. Its protective layers guard our muscles, bones, internal organs, and ligaments, while its active function results in the most fundamental of our five senses – that of touch. For all our focus on maintaining optimal organ function through diet, exercise, and lifestyle, could it be that we’re neglecting the organ that figures most prominently in our daily, direct communion with the material world?

I know that it’s awfully easy for me to go several days without real, meaningful physical contact with another human when I’m on the road promoting the book or giving a talk. Oh, sure, there are handshakes and incidental shoulder brushes and maybe even the occasional fist bump, but it’s not the same. I miss my wife and kids. You can’t exactly hug total strangers (nor would you really want to) or even business associates. When I’m away from my family and close friends, I realize just how ubiquitous our self-made, imaginary personal bubbles have become. We all walk around with them. This world is getting more crowded every day, and yet we’re somehow able to maneuver through it without so much as touching a single person unless we’re crammed into a train or city street. And still, even in those situations, people are loathe to make contact with one another, even ocular, and we manage to avoid most of it.

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