Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Month: May 2009

The Definitive Guide to Feeding Primal Babies

It’s commonly portrayed as the realm of infant formula, rice cereal, applesauce, teething biscuits, Zwieback toast and Cheerios. And in the following months a large pantry selection of strained this or that in tiny glass, commercial jars… Add to this picture more recent concoctions like toddler formula, Elmo crackers, mini juice packs, fruit gummies, and “Graduate” lines. All of this begs the question, exactly when and how did baby/early toddler nutrition become a string of processed convenience foods? The ingredient lists often smack more of Candyland than the “wholesome goodness” claimed on the labels. Was this really what nature intended? Can’t we do better by our baby Groks? What would Grandma Grok have to say about all of this? We’ve taken up the kid question before, but I thought it was time for a definitive focus on the youngest of the seedling set.

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Dear Readers

The response to “Dear Readers” questions has been fantastic. This week I’ve added a poll to make answering fellow readers’ inquiries even easier, so chime in with your opinion and make your voice heard.

Question 1

Hi Mark

Just wondering if you have run across this stuff: Shirataki Miracle Noodle. It’s been mentioned in a few different magazines/websites and the ingredients for the main type (the angel hair pasta) are listed as Water, glucomannan (soluble fiber), calcium additive.

Any ideas if the base (glucomannan) is a primal-type ingredient? A quick look at Wikipedia shows that it usually comes from the root of two plants I’ve never heard of … just wondering if it would fall into the same category as potatoes or more sweet potatoes?

Jedidja

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Weekend Link Love – Edition 51

Tummy tucking and breast augmentation are behind the times. In the world of useless, invasive surgery, the fashionable thing to do is get the fat sucked out of your eye sockets. (Thanks to Dr. Eades for digging up this one)

Are pets good for your health? Read Cranky Fitness to find out. (Warning: Lolcats included)

If you’ve got an hour, this video of Gary Taubes does a great job of summing up his wonderful book, Good Calories, Bad Calories. (thanks for posting this in the forum, Tim!)

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Miracle Fruit

From reading MDA, you might get the idea that we’re a little too focused on health, wellness, nutrition, and fitness for our own good. I can’t say I blame you. We do love our facts, our science, and our experiential evidence (hey, when you’re a vocal proponent of a lifestyle in direct opposition to Conventional Wisdom, you need to back your claims up), but we also stress that the Primal Blueprint is about enjoying life and fulfilling our existence. Our recipes are healthy, but they’re also rich, hearty, and delicious. Our exercise recommendations are intense and effective, but they’re also interesting, varied, and fun. The concept of regular play and social bonding is a huge part of our philosophy, and we fully promote the consumption of reasonable amounts of red wine and good dark chocolate (preferably together). That said, a post on miracle fruit is long overdue, and, to be expected.

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How to Make Pemmican

Vihljamur Stefansson, eminent anthropologist and arctic explorer, went on three expeditions into the Alaskan tundra during the first quarter of the 20th century. His discoveries – including the “blond” Inuit and previously uncharted Arctic lands – brought him renown on the world stage. People were fascinated by his approach to travel and exploration, the way he thrust himself fully into the native Inuit cultures he encountered. Stefansson studied their language, adopted their ways, and ate the same food they ate. In fact, it was the diet of the Inuit – fish, marine mammals, and other animals, with almost no vegetables or carbohydrates – that most intrigued him. He noted that, though their diet would be considered nutritionally bereft by most “experts” (hey, nothing’s changed in a hundred years!), the Inuit seemed to be in excellent health, with strong teeth, bones, and muscles. He was particularly interested in a food called pemmican.

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The “Grok Crawl”

One of the more underappreciated developmental milestones in an infant’s life is the act of crawling. First words, walking, reading – these get all the attention, but it’s crawling that helps kids develop the important upper and lower body strength that will serve as a foundation for later activity and basic movement. Some pull and push with their arms while scooting along with their knees. Others crawl with their elbows like soldiers slogging through a battlefield. Whatever their methods, when compared to kids who skipped crawling and went straight to walking, early crawlers seem to have better motor skills. They understand bilateral coordination (using the arms and legs in reciprocal movements), they have a better sense of depth perception, and all that time spent on their hands gives crawlers better grasping strength.

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