Meet Mark

Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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Month: February 2008

Dear Mark: Weightlifting Weary

After last week’s great discussion about chronic cardio, we wanted to highlight a related question we received recently.

Dear Mark,

I workout 5-6 days a week and do a lot of weightlifting in my routine. I’ve made good progress in the last several months, but I notice myself feeling more run down lately. Got any advice?

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The Best of Mark’s Daily Apple: January 2008

While most of the country was freezing this January we were having a HOT month at Mark’s Daily Apple. Thanks to you, our readers, we were all able to engage in a heated and lively debate on everything from Big Pharma to protein. Here are some of the best posts of January put together in a nice little condensed batch for your perusal. Enjoy!

Orthorexia Nervosa and Dietary Obsession – Jan. 1

Top 10 Vegetables for the Winter Season – Jan. 8

5 Meats to Avoid – Jan. 14

Dear Mark: Pondering Protein – Jan. 14

Flame Thrower: Top 10 Natural Ways to Reduce Inflammation – Jan. 15

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Nature Tops Nurture? Scientists Wrong Again…

They just don’t get it. Maybe they never will.

Reader Karen was outraged enough to send us a link to a news story on MSNBC that states “Nature tops nurture for heavy kids, study says. Research on twins finds that weight is 77 percent attributable to genes.” Thanks, Karen.

Read the abstract here.

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Friday Link Love

Conditioning Research reports a score for low-carb and paleo diets.

Eating Fabulous considers a few benefits of the oft-vilified cholesterol.

zenhabits offers 17 Fitness Truths to Get You in Shape.

The Consumerist keeps an always critical eye on those sneaky fast food marketers.

Interactive Health posts video tips on how to increase the mobility of tense shoulders.

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Diet Soda Might Increase Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

A study in the Jan. 22 edition of Circulation suggests that drinking diet soda may increase your chance of developing metabolic syndrome.

To evaluate the link between nutrition and metabolic syndrome, researchers from the University of Minnesota analyzed the daily diets of more than 9,514 men and women between the ages of 45 and 64 enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

After following the health of these individuals for nine years, there were 3,782 reports of metabolic syndrome, a condition diagnosed by physicians based on the presence of several risk factors thought to increase an individual’s risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke such as abdominal adiposity, elevated blood pressure, high blood triglyceride levels, unhealthy cholesterol levels and elevated blood sugar.

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High Blood Pressure and Follow-up Care

High blood pressure is a major public health threat and one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. An analysis of hospitalization and follow-up care for individuals with severe hypertension, however, shows gaping holes in the maintenance of care.

Granger and colleagues at nearly two dozen institutions around the country created a special registry to find out what happens to patients with acute, severe hypertension – those with blood pressure readings above 160/110 – when they come to an emergency department or critical care setting for treatment. They found that although 90 percent of them already had a diagnosis of high blood pressure, about a quarter of them were not taking the medicines they were supposed to. The researchers also found that extremely high blood pressure was related to high complication and death rates. Many of the patients already had major organ damage and over six percent of them died in the hospital. Upon discharge, most of the patients were given prescriptions for at least two medicines, but 41 percent had to be readmitted within three months.

via Medical News Today

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