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Let me introduce myself. My name is Mark Sisson. I’m 63 years young. I live and work in Malibu, California. In a past life I was a professional marathoner and triathlete. Now my life goal is to help 100 million people get healthy. I started this blog in 2006 to empower people to take full responsibility for their own health and enjoyment of life by investigating, discussing, and critically rethinking everything we’ve assumed to be true about health and wellness...

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August 28, 2012

20 Ways to Cultivate IE in Your Life

By Mark Sisson
123 Comments

Recently, I caught up with an old friend of mine. He’d just returned home from a trip to the Northern Midwest, where they rented a cabin on one of the Great Lakes with family. He showed me pictures of his kids. Being used to a landlocked existence, his 6-year-old daughter had been wholly enthralled by the vastness of the lake, which she referred to as the ocean throughout the entire trip. One afternoon as their younger child napped, he took his older daughter to a nearby park reserve for a bit of exploration. She was mesmerized by a river gorge and more so by the brave, unruly souls who were hurling themselves off a rock ledge into the borderline hypothermic water hole below. What ultimately drew her in that afternoon, he explained, was a sandy beach cove lined with enough tall jagged boulders to make a dramatic show of the temperamental lake’s waves. She ran along that beach all afternoon, he said, scrambling up rocks, dancing along the shore, teasing the waves to catch her bare feet, and squealing at the cold and sheer exhilaration. In one picture, we stood looking out across the lake with outstretched arms, “commanding the sea,” as her dad described laughingly. When you’re six, after all, that’s entirely within the realm of possibility…. My friend’s eyes reflected a deep, parental sense of awe as he showed me the pictures and told me about that afternoon, his favorite time of the entire trip. He clearly marveled at his daughter’s innocent, wild wonder in the same way she marveled at the “ocean” that day.

Last week I introduced the Primal principle of IE – intermittent euphoria – to re-prioritize the peaks of life – the thrill, wonder, and amazement possible in this existence of ours. Thriving, after all, isn’t about accomplishing an inventory of “healthy” behaviors each day. It’s about living out the full measure of your humanity – in all its depth, vigor, and vitality. Euphoria, of course, isn’t something you can summon at will. It doesn’t lend itself to a handy checklist. In fact, it most often catches us unaware. Nonetheless, we can cultivate a mindset and lifestyle conducive to euphoria – one that seeks adventure, values awe, and relishes discovery.

Euphoria comes when we venture ourselves in some way. We give it space when we let go of our self chatter, inner list making, and task orientation. We open ourselves to it when we release the tendency, as author Paul Pearsall puts it, to be “too self conscious to be fully conscious.” In prioritizing IE, we can pursue experiences with the power to elicit deep feeling (e.g. fear, awe, connection) and simply cultivate a mindset open to wonder. Here you’ll find some modestly proposed ideas to galvanize a good Primal life with some intermittent opportunity. I hope you’ll add your own ideas to the conversation.

  1. Witness the wonder others experience. Seeing your child filled with awe is undoubtedly one of the most rewarding moments of parenting. You can encounter it, however, in your aging parents, close friends, your partner, nieces/nephews, and complete strangers. Seeing that unmistakable look in others’ eyes inevitably unlocks something in ourselves. We can be deeply moved witnessing another person’s awe.
  2. Make your own list of “natural wonders” you want to see. Make #1 your next vacation destination.
  3. Find – and regularly enjoy – music that sends chills running through you. If you can, see it performed live.
  4. Spend an entire day noticing things you know you otherwise overlook in a typical hurried day. Observe puddle reflections. Examine the trees in your neighborhood. Watch your children’s myriad expressions throughout an afternoon hike.
  5. Read books that make you feel you’re living inside the story.
  6. Watch (or attend!) events that evoke a sense of connectedness and wonder. It’s little surprise I’m a fan of the Olympics. To this day, I relish the moment in the opening ceremonies of the Barcelona Summer Games when the archer lit the cauldron with that flaming arrow. How many hundreds of millions – or perhaps billions – of people around the world hung on the arc of that arrow’s trajectory?
  7. Go for a long night walk in the woods, through the fields, along a beach. No flashlights.
  8. Invest in experiences.
  9. Volunteer on the front line of need. You may feel intimidated or maybe awkward. You won’t know the perfect thing to say handing out dinner to a young family in a soup kitchen. You will come away each time, however, having done something meaningful and having been changed in the process.
  10. Take up an “extreme” sport (it’s all relative here, folks) you’ve been pondering (e.g. deep sea diving/snorkeling, mountain climbing/tree climbing, trail running/trail hiking). Take a lesson. Sign up for an outing. If you’re already an extreme enthusiast, find a new destination or variation of your sport to challenge yourself.
  11. Indulge in nostalgia. Reread old letters or watch family videos. Getting wistful over memories can enhance our feeling of connectedness.
  12. Recall past experiences of euphoria. What have been the most thrilling, most meaningful hours of your life? What would’ve inspired you as a kid? Bring that fascination to whatever happens this day.
  13. Spend a day doing a novel kind of exploring. Go caving, map a trail, or set out on a hike with an artistic (e.g. photographic journal) or scientific (e.g. bird cataloging) goal in mind.
  14. Take an adventure vacation – as a personal retreat or a family project. Bike across the state, climb a triad of mountains, run a lighthouse for a week. It will be much more memorable than a hotel pool or standing in line at Orlando.
  15. Do something that scares you. (Anyone?) Revel in the sharp awareness that overtakes you. It’s a poignant dimension of being fully alive.
  16. Take on a creative project unlike anything you’ve committed to before. What do you want your opus to be? Begin it today.
  17. Spend a day in a busy public place (e.g. train station, popular coffee shop) and people watch. See how much you can learn or ascertain about the characters you encounter. Imagine their stories.
  18. Borrow a telescope or visit an area planetarium for their late night star gazing program.
  19. Find a beautiful vista-side or secluded outdoor “sit spot” and see what reveals itself in an afternoon.
  20. Put on a 6-year-old’s mindset for the day. Go out into the world – preferably the natural world. “Command” the waves, conquer the squirrels, orchestrate the clouds, hang from the tree branches, journey an animated path full of risk and marvel.

Thanks for reading today, everyone. Share what moves you to experience IE in life these days. Have a great week!

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123 Comments on "20 Ways to Cultivate IE in Your Life"

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brandon
brandon
4 years 27 days ago

MovNat, in Nature and lose yourself in the movement. Never fails for me.

Tracy
Tracy
4 years 27 days ago

yes!! me, too. It really is a mindful practice and being mindful leads to euphoria.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 27 days ago
Once I climbed a tree with a three other people. Tree climbing is usually something I do alone but I was lucky to be accompanied by people with some shared interests. It was one of my best experiences… a psychedelic one – I don’t want to talk about drugs too often here, it being a health site, but it’s relevant to the experience. Two of us, the two I think were most enthusiastic about climbing the tree up to a platform someone had built, discussed as we were climbing how we felt like the tree was helping us climb and… Read more »
Sharon
Sharon
4 years 27 days ago

I like this story. A zen moment?

Christina
Christina
4 years 27 days ago

I hear you on the psychedelic aspect. What a wonderful experience. Wow.

Joe
Joe
4 years 27 days ago

+ 1 to psychedelics!

Ma Flintstone
Ma Flintstone
4 years 27 days ago
I remember being on something and watching a Mash repeat back in the early nineties. It was the funniest thing I had ever seen in my life- oscillated between giggles and outright hysterics. Then my boyfriend and I went through to bedroom (my parents were away) and my ceiling turned into water and I had an informal chat to my long dead grandfather through the reflection. That was the first time. I didn’t take much thereafter, I only wanted an experience to understand what the deal was, but my friends took a fair bit recreationally and always went wondering in… Read more »
jj
jj
4 years 25 days ago

Can I just suggest that it might be a bad idea to climb trees on psychedelics, particularly if you’re doing any “risky maneuvers”. I have a friend who sustained a substantial head injury that way. A lifetime of anti-seizure meds isn’t particularly primal.

Not that I’m against taking risks or climbing trees or psychedelics… all of which are worthwhile, but can backfire. Combining them however can be a recipe for disaster.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago
I agree but that time I had good coordination (better than normal I think) and was reasonably sure I’d be safe. There are some substances that I feel confident being physically active under the influence of and others I think are best for chilling. That time there were three in my system – two of them I already had extensive experience climbing trees with and the other was basically an upper. I’ve also climbed trees drunk.. and learned not to repeat that. My back still hurts a bit from over two weeks ago when one moment I was walking along… Read more »
Animanarchy
Animanarchy
2 years 2 months ago

http://www.sott.net/article/281051-Tree-hugging-is-good-for-you
I knew it. I even sharpied something on part of a bridge after climbing a tree to get to a ledge beneath it mentioning something like this. It was close to “This spot is so chillin’, but be sure to touch the tree once in a while to use it as a conduit to the earth to resonate closer to its natural frequency, which is also your brain’s: 7.83Hz.”

Mary Taylor
Mary Taylor
4 years 27 days ago
This is a great list and I’m sure many people have their own ways of finding IE but may not even realize it. I would advise AGAINST walking without a flashlight in the woods, unless it’s a really full mooon. There are far too many true predators in the woods west of Denver including bear, mountain lion, and moose. Unless you’re on a very established, well worn path, the other worry is falling over a tree log – something which I have done personally while trying this very thing years ago. Despite a full moon, the contrast is all off… Read more »
Susan
Susan
4 years 27 days ago

I was thinking the same thing. My hubby was walking down our driveway from the road and nearly stepped on a copperhead. I’m less enthusiastic about night walks since then. No, I’m not a snake-phobe either.
Otherwise, great list. Many of the things I have been doing all my life when I thought I was wasting time. 🙂

Jenna
Jenna
4 years 27 days ago

Beware of the walking down the beach barefoot at night with no light, especially if it is an ocean beach with a reasonable population of small children. People seem to enjoy digging enormous holes in the sand on shell quests, and depending on where you are, there are risks of stepping on jellyfish. I used to think barefoot nighttime walks on the beach sounded like heaven, too, until I realized how much dangerous stuff (broken shells, broken glass, fish hooks, fish bones, jellyfish, deep holes, etc.) there was.

Animanarchy
3 years 6 months ago

… and the needles and pieces and broken glass! Not bowl spitting. In Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, my grandparents used to take my siblings and I for walks and I remember seeing needles and broken glass along the shore.
I also remember seeing salmon that had shored themselves after migration. That seemed a bit pointless.

Gift Clumsywarrior
4 years 26 days ago
Haha I was thinking about the same thing here in Arizona. I went hiking the other day and have to hike down at night. I was so scared, the innate fear arise. The whole time I feel like I might die, falling from the mountain any minutes ( well this happen when I hike down steep rocky mountains during the day too). But I was reading a book by this guy, Stuart Wilde, saying that walking in the wood in the dark is one of the thing that really evokes his senses, after a while your peripheral vision is activated,… Read more »
Rick P
Rick P
4 years 26 days ago

Inversions during yoga as a means of scaring you in a positive way. Interesting! I’ll have to Youtube that one.

Grok On Rock
4 years 26 days ago

Seriously? We can’t even get to 10 posts before someone goes fretting about the dangers of doing stuff that humans have been doing for hundreds of thousands of years? Predatory animals have been around as long as we have — it’s something we deal with.
I’ve hiked in the foothills of Colorado (and plenty of other places out west) at all hours, and the risks of running into something that wants to eat you are extremely low. Besides, a little bit of spookiness makes things more exciting.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago
When feeling threatened by wild animals an intimidation response is often a good way to go. Make yourself look bigger and make a lot of noise. You can fill a can with pennies, rocks etc. and shake it like a rattle. Maybe blow a whistle or carry an alarm. When I was younger going for walks in the woods I’d often bring a stick or metal pole with me partially out of fear, partially because it made me feel kind of badass. One night a few years ago I was walking home along a paved country road and saw three… Read more »
Merky
Merky
4 years 27 days ago

I have never felt more alive then when I hit the ground after sky diving my first (and so far only) time. I literally threw my head back and screamed out of pure adrenaline, excitement, and joy. I felt like I had discovered the true meaning to life in that 30 sec free fall. I recommend the experience to anyone healthy enough to partake.

Primal Toad
4 years 27 days ago

Where did you sky dive? I’ll be doing this fairly soon. If not this year then next year! I plan on getting dozens of primal folks together to do this with. Bungee jumping and many more scary activities too.

J. Delancy
4 years 27 days ago

If it helps, I have a post about skydiving, entitled, Skydiving: 4 Things You Won’t Learn From A Movie” it gives some insight into the whole experience. I didn’t find it euphoric but it was life and mind altering.

Every success!

Primal Toad
Primal Toad
4 years 27 days ago

Great post!! This makes me want to officially skydive. Ill be adding it to my bucket list!

Doug D
Doug D
4 years 27 days ago
Sky diving will happen for me this weekend, weather depending. For me, participating in BIG physically demanding events (half marathon, Tough Mudder) make me feel all giddy upon completion. I have Fibromyalgia, and living Primally has all but erradicated the worst symptoms, so these big physical challenges are REALLY big for me. I have come from a very dark, painful, emotionally draining place into this world of light, happiness and good health, so every time I complete an athletic challenge, I am absolutely HIGH on life! (Even though I am usually so physically exhausted that I should be collapsing into… Read more »
Christian
Christian
4 years 27 days ago

Well done for not letting your illness beat you. Too many ‘healthy’ people are forever finding excuses not to do something. You’ve insure me for the day so thank you and all the best.

flenser
4 years 27 days ago

Do something that scares me?

Since I adopted primal eating I’ve sort of developed this fear of eating bagels… does that count?

Primal Toad
4 years 27 days ago

Maybe if you spread a bunch of liver pate on it!

Shay
4 years 27 days ago

Haha, me too! I had a nightmare last night that I ate a mountain of bread and ice cream…I woke up relieved!!

Pilgrim
Pilgrim
4 years 27 days ago

I totally agree with walking in forests in the dark, no flashlight, though I would recommend waiting for a full moon. When I was a boy we did a 20 mile hike at night at scout camp every year. I have some great memories of those hikes. Anyway, it’s all about the mountains for me. Mountains and mountain rivers. Can’t get enough of it.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago
I did something similar one night. My parents revoked my bail, told me, and I freaked out, so while my mom was on the phone describing what I was wearing to the local detachment I was filling a backpack with more clothes and some food and water. I had enough time to hug one of my cats outside the front door and rush across a field across the road from my house before two cruisers pulled in the driveway, went to the door, then hurried back to their cars, one of which had a searchlight on top that they were… Read more »
Primal Toad
4 years 27 days ago

Well this is something I’ll be referencing multiple times over the next decade!!

It seems as if I’ll engage in all of these 20 recommendations while walking across all 50 states of America.

I begin mid to late September…

Chris
4 years 27 days ago

I really need to get back to experiencing nature. I’ve become to distant form it, and accepted it. I’d love to go back to the Rockies and just “be” again.

Sharon
Sharon
4 years 27 days ago
I like to sit by the window when in a commercial airline because often there are perspectives on scenes I have never before seen. Once, while flying through the most incredible canyon of clouds I got really excited. As usual, the rest of the passengers refused to be the least bit interested. I can’t believe any of them had ever seen such and incredible sight before. I don’t know about walking through a forest at night without a light but I do recommend hugging a variety of trees. There is something wonderful about it, although I don’t know what it… Read more »
Meesha
Meesha
4 years 27 days ago

My neck is always sore after a plane flight from looking out the window. 🙂

Alison Golden
4 years 27 days ago

Oof. Watching young kids climb rocks like monkeys at the ocean edge is nightmarish for this mom but I know it was great for them in so many ways and make them *so* happy. I don’t know who was more euphoric when it was over – them or me. 😉

gibson girl
gibson girl
4 years 27 days ago

I know what you’re saying. I found watching strangers’ kids didn’t bring out the same anxiety. Maternal instinct is quite a force!

Peter
4 years 27 days ago

Surf. Its cheap, fun to learn, different every time… the list goes on. Mark knows whats up with the SUP.

mars
mars
4 years 27 days ago

+1

PaleoPoser
PaleoPoser
4 years 27 days ago

I have checked out SUP boards. Not cheap, really. 🙂

Tom B-D
Tom B-D
4 years 27 days ago

When we lived in Venice CA, I had a summer working for myself where I followed high tide all summer, bodysurfing (never got good with the board). Peak experience: sunset, decent waves backlit by the setting sun…then 3 dolphins (porpoise? never got clear on that) shooting through our wave just before we got it…just don’t get that in Chicago!

BillP
BillP
4 years 27 days ago

An idea for an IE (and very primieval) experience: find a comfortable sit-spot outside at night, in a lawn chair under a tree for instance, be still, and just wait for the wildlife to show up. Around here we have opossum, raccoon, bobcat, grey fox, coyote, domestic cats, rabbits & other rodents, owls, skunks. Amazing what is going through the yard at night! And how you will be ignored if you don’t move around too much.

Ma Flintstone
Ma Flintstone
4 years 27 days ago

Sounds like a good place to set up a barbeque.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago
I domesticated some “wild” kittens. Three my family took from a barn-like building when I was young, 7 or 8, and they were really young so they got imprinted on us. Another was an older kitten, which I entrapped mischievously. I was renting a room and a mother and its male kitten were living under the back deck. My landlord’s daughter did most of the work befriending him first and said he let her pet him once and my landlord bought cat food so we’d all been feeding them. As they got more used to us they’d come closer to… Read more »
mars
mars
4 years 27 days ago

Great post!

We’re going camping this weekend and bringing the telescope to see the blue moon this friday! Our 4-year old is very excited as are we…

Sarah
4 years 27 days ago

I love your suggestions. 5 is one of my favourite things to do.

I suggest geocaching – discover great new places near where you live and get away from things for a while. Great fun for kids too.

Lea
Lea
4 years 27 days ago

My son is 3 1/2. I love to just stare at his beautiful face. He catches me quite often and laughs. He’ll say, “Mommy, what’s the matter?” I tell him “nothing is the matter.” He says, “you’re funny mommy.” In those moments, I feel like life cannot possibly get any better.

Resurgent
Resurgent
4 years 27 days ago
@Animanarchy – Here is an excerpt from an eastern mystical book that I was reading earlier today.. Rhymes well with your experience “Have you ever said, “Hello, to a tree? You yourself would think that you are going out of your mind. Have you ever touched a tree with love, the same way you would touch your beloved? Have you ever hugged a tree? You are missing a whole world of sensitivity that surrounds you, that is available. Slowly, slowly, you will start feeling that when you say hello to a tree…of course, it cannot respond in language, but it… Read more »
Paleo Bon Rurgundy
4 years 27 days ago

When I talk to trees they always bark at me.

Doug D
Doug D
4 years 27 days ago

That’s beautiful. What’s the book title? I think I’d like to read that.

Resurgent
Resurgent
4 years 27 days ago

It is an old book – Look for it in a library. The Amazon link is here:
http://www.amazon.com/The-golden-future-Rajneesh/dp/3893380175/

judipurple
judipurple
4 years 27 days ago

oh my goodness…during my 3x week walk/sprint, there are three incredible trees I make a point to greet and at least lay my hands on [no hugging – residential area ;)]- two are tremendous old oaks, and the other (my favorite) is a gnarly, twisted ancient butternut tree. And, yes, there is a certain energy flow; I know I walk with a bit more pep after saying hello. This posting truly spoke to me – thank you.

WildGrok
WildGrok
4 years 27 days ago

Wow this reminds me the episode of the Dinosaurs, when Sinclair switches with a tree

Ma Flintstone
Ma Flintstone
4 years 27 days ago

Resurgent; J.P Farrell has the physics to describe the ‘alive’ rocks- or at least the means for everything to contain consciousness, albeit past experience locked in to it. It’s trippy but followable. He describes the Giza pyramids vibrations… oh man, where to start.
He has the physics at any rate.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago
Awesome. And that last sentence, due to the mention of birds, just reminded me of something I’ve been meaning to post for a while but kept forgetting. In a town I was recently living in I spent a lot of time hanging around in a plaza parking lot with a bunch of “friends” (I didn’t know them well but was accepted into the group because of a mutual friend). One of these people is a good guy but spazzed out a lot at various people or various things, often shouting on the edge of an angry hysteria, pretty much steaming… Read more »
Adrian
4 years 27 days ago

I think intermittent euphoria is the reason Maurice Sendak has maintained such lasting popularity. Every time I read ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ to my son, I am careful to watch his eyes as I turn the page. I can only imagine what a scary, wonderful experience it is for him to see the pictures.

mars
mars
4 years 27 days ago

+1

my favorite book when i was a kid, and now my kid’s favorite book! I have an original 1963 edition!

Groktimus Primal
4 years 27 days ago

Sorry Mark. I can’t achieve IE with my pants on 🙂

Rob
Rob
4 years 27 days ago

Spot on. Perfect reminder in the middle of a hectic time that we still need to be aware of those little IE moments around us that all too often go unnoticed.

I’m in on the surfing!

gibson girl
gibson girl
4 years 27 days ago

Great topic, Mark. I actually get to live on one of the great lakes. It is awesome! Great place to lose the clamoring of SELF and begin to be part of the universe.

No urge to walk through the woods at night around here. Lots of logs and holes, skunks and coyotes and even cougars and black bears! Did i mention mosquitos? 🙂

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago

Death to mosquitoes! A huge one landed on me the other day. It was about three times bigger than a regular mosquito and a darker brown with darker stripes. If I remember right it also had white stripes on its legs.. can’t be sure because I quickly as possible brushed it away after examining it in shock momentarily.

:-P
:-P
4 years 27 days ago
I went to a local reservoir with my family. We landed the boat in this random area and a friend of my brother found a small waterfall caused by late-season rains. It was kind of hard to get up to, and I knew it would be more difficult to get down, but I made the climb anyway. The last time I saw a waterfall was at Yosemite. On a whim, I stood under it and let the cool water flow over me. It was exhilarating! I could feel the energy and pulse of the water (it would flow more for… Read more »
Lauren
4 years 27 days ago

3, 8, and 16 seem like the ones I do a lot. Great ideas, will have to try some of them especially the nature stuff!

Charlayna
4 years 27 days ago

Hiking at night during winter in Alaska is pretty awesome. The snow reflects the moon fairly well, so it’s light enough that you don’t need headlamps.

I always used to do this with my boyfriend when I lived on campus in Anchorage to avoid angry moose! Man… I miss those days.

NA
NA
4 years 27 days ago

What a magical image! Reminds me of Michigan in the winter in my childhood. Thanks for sharing.

Amy P
Amy P
4 years 27 days ago

I found joy this weekend when I kayaked for the first time…hooked for life.

Michelle
Michelle
4 years 27 days ago

I seldom comment on any post, but this touched my heart. Why must we make things so difficult? Simple pleasures trump everything else we percieve to be important. Thank you for the reminder, and better yet, through the lens of a six year old!

:-P
:-P
4 years 27 days ago
Several years ago, I took a 10-day wilderness skills course near the Shasta wilderness. We camped for these ten days and learned about primitive survival techniques. The morning of the sweat felt different from the other days. The sunrise was pink and the air had a closeness and heaviness to it, it made everything seem oddly quiet. As the day went on, it began to cloud up and, later, we would get intermittent thunder claps. By nightfall, the thunderstorm was going in full force. And we went and had the sweat anyway. We didn’t even use the pool to cool… Read more »
:-P
:-P
4 years 27 days ago

Standing out there, I felt as though I was straddling the boundary between life and death. It was conceivable that a lightning bolt could come my way. The idea made me a little uncomfortable, but I wasn’t afraid.

If it was going to happen that night this would be one of the better ways to die.

Elizabeth McInerney
Elizabeth McInerney
4 years 27 days ago

Go Nordic Skiing on a cold winter night with headlamps on, full moon, snow falling.

Stacie
4 years 27 days ago

I’ll definitely be doing that this winter!

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago
I used to occasionally run through a forest I knew well (had a bit of a path developing) in the dark with a headlamp. It was thrilling and surreal. The light illuminating branches and twigs one moment then others at different distances the next as the elevation it shone from changed made everything look a little choppy. It almost seemed that what was illuminated was all that existed, or that what existed beyond the “light radius” was a mysterious ether that could generate anything. I guess it would be what you make of it, but to me it seemed sort… Read more »
J. Delancy
4 years 27 days ago

Watching children fly kites, can be euphoric. Their happiness is infections even if you haven’t flown a kite in 20 years.

Iris
Iris
4 years 27 days ago

Going to primal con 2013. Either way, will be an adventure 😉

Stacie
4 years 27 days ago
I think the last purely nature euphoria I experienced was watching the aurora borealis last winter (aka. Northern Lights). I live in Anchorage and the lights that night were simply amazing. I had friends say they could see them in town, white, purple, green, and some red. But I was up on one of the mountains and it was simply one of the most marvelous things I’ve EVER experienced. It was like looking at a wind chime that was made out of lights, the way they danced and moved across the sky. There were moments when I thought I could… Read more »
Chika
Chika
4 years 27 days ago

“Invest in experiences” … I like this one alot. Simply stated yet full of endless possibilities and potential memories to cherish.

Hiking anyone?

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago

I wonder, is that one a subliminal suggestion to go to Primalcon? 😯

locogirlp
locogirlp
4 years 27 days ago

This might be too “simple” (though I think that’s the point, ha!) but my latest IE moment was choosing to swim in the Brazos River in the pouring rain, with lightning crackling overhead. Watching the raindrops hitting the surface of the water and making bubbles with each hit was amazing. I know I laughed aloud more times than I can count.

Penfold_67
Penfold_67
4 years 27 days ago

Loved this post. There is so much round about us and we just don’t always take the time too see and experience it. I’ve started making better use of my lunchtimes in the city centre. All our museums are free and just this week I’ve marvelled at the beauty of a Salvador Dali painting, been awestruck at the size and history of a locomotive and enjoyed a organ recital.

PracticeBalance
4 years 27 days ago

This post is exactly why this blog stands out from others in the same genre. Thanks so much for the reminders listed here!

Morgan
Morgan
4 years 27 days ago

I’m surprised the euphoria experienced when making a love connection was not addressed here.

Al
Al
4 years 27 days ago

I would second music, but suggest that people look a bit further afield and experiment with music they might not necessarily have heard before. I find a lot of non-English recording artists tend to write songs that are more euphoric, more beautiful, more sonically meaningful than a lot of Western English-language music these days.

Also, dancing is a pretty good way to let everything float away.

WildGrok
WildGrok
4 years 27 days ago

Go to a Zumba class and you will have an out of world experience 🙂

Morgan
Morgan
4 years 27 days ago

Swimming I’m the ocean is one of the few ways I can naturally induce euphoria. Love is the other. Just hugging someone I have that kind of connection with will do it for me. Actually, just thinking about them will. But like mark said, our minds and hearts have to be open; the connection must be allowed to develop and build.

Mark Cruden
Mark Cruden
4 years 27 days ago

Sailing, man.

Kay
Kay
4 years 27 days ago

I think number 7 and 15
Would be the same thing. Eeeeek

Susan Kelly
Susan Kelly
4 years 27 days ago

Barefoot (or minimal sandal) run or walk in snow or cold rain. It’s exhilarating to me to know I can do that and survive.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago

A twist on an old cliché that came to me in the woods today, sorry if it’s not original – Before you insult someone who’s primal, walk a mile barefoot (or in their Vibrams/moccasins/etc. I’ve been wearing boot-slippers as they were free.. they were a bit embarrassing at first but removing the pom pom things and adding half a shoelace to each made a difference.)

Ashley
Ashley
4 years 27 days ago

Raking a pile of leaves (since fall is on its way) and then jumping in.

Taking a nap in the sun.

Singing and dancing around the house.

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 24 days ago

Raking/sweeping/mopping etc. is a great cool down after an arm workout, and can sometimes even be one.
No wonder when my occupation was janitor I looked like a gorilla.

mars
mars
4 years 27 days ago

#18 “Borrow a telescope or visit an area planetarium for their late night star gazing program.”

This Friday is a rare blue moon folks! There won’t be another for 3 more years, so get out there and experience it!

Joy Beer
Joy Beer
4 years 27 days ago

Sometimes I like to go into my back yard at night, down a little bit away from the house, about 20 meters will do, and just look at my little ranch house, with the lights glowing from inside. And then look up at the stars. Then at my little house. “I own that!” and, “I’m part of all this!”

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago

I do that with my campsites / makeshift shelters/ lurking grounds.. then I often think, “Damn, didn’t realize people can probably see me”.
It’s considered uncouth to act like an animal.
Once even doing the monkey bars forwards then backwards as fast as I could got me laughed at by some girls.

Kathy
Kathy
4 years 27 days ago

Caving, yes! But if you’re not a caver, contact the National Speleological Society and find a friend who knows caving, so you and the cave finish the adventure unscathed.

Drewbie
4 years 27 days ago

I have one more to add to the list: Journaling. It’s a great way to destress. It often invokes in me a moment of clarity that gives me more energy to tackle the day.

MissusN
MissusN
4 years 27 days ago
Great article! I’ve experienced euphoria yesterday, when I was walking to the grocery store for the first time in a month. Having been very ill from a deep vein thrombosis in my pelvis, I wasn’t able to move around the last couple of weeks. Now I’m starting to walk again, though heavily sedated, and I feel a renewed thankfulness for my body and it’s ability to move. Looking forward to dancing again, which brings me to my own addition to this list: dance like nobody is looking, enjoy the feeling of freedom and enjoy your body – because being healthy… Read more »
Evolutionarily
4 years 27 days ago

Or do what Hunter Gatherers did and search out natural psychoactive substances!

Animanarchy
Animanarchy
4 years 25 days ago

Yes!
Spent like two hours once picking mushrooms in a cow field. Ate them all. Nothing.
But I’ve gleaned a few green plants and their product here and there.

Julie
Julie
4 years 27 days ago

Great post–inspiring!

Amy
Amy
4 years 27 days ago
Re. #14: Last weekend my husband and I stayed overnight at a lighthouse on a tiny island off the coast of Maine. During the day, we explored the island, watched seals and eagles, and foraged for mushrooms. My euphoric moment was sitting outside at midnight with the Milky Way in full view, hearing the horn sound, and watching the light slowly circle around. It was stunningly beautiful, and made me think of the connection between the sailors out at sea and the lighthouse keepers guiding them safely back to shore. This weekend is a surfing lesson and now I’m thinking… Read more »
chocolatechip69
chocolatechip69
4 years 27 days ago

I just got back from a 3 day trip to Canada. My friend and I wanted to do a road trip without necessarily picking a direction to go to, so we just headed north, and 11 hrs later ended up in beautiful Canada with its million lakes and rivers, bearth-taking landscapes, and all the wonders of nature.
Instead of getting a hotel or motel, we just camped at different camp-sites.

It was so relaxing. Things like that make you appreciate life and remember that there’s so much more to it than your job and daily grind that tends to suck you in.

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